University of Utah
Physics
PHYS Course Descriptions
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University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2012
Posted Mar 02, 2012

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2012, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1010  Elementary Physics: The Way Things Work (3) Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Conceptual Physics course which satisfies a General Education requirement for majors outside the science and engineering disciplines. The primary objective is to provide a solid foundation in physics principles, focusing on fundamental concepts and logical rather than numerical problem solving. Connections between abstract concepts and familiar objects or phenomena help students develop their physical intuition and demonstrate that the universe is predictable rather than magical.

1050  The Solar System (3) Cross listed as ASTR 1050. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Astronomy--from ancient to modern times. Central theme will be the attempt to understand the nature and origin of our solar system starting with early ideas of the cosmos, proceeding through investigations that led to the scientific revolution of the 17th century and culminating with the observations and discoveries made by the 20th-century space program. Topics will include apparent motions of the sun, moon, planets, and stars; seasons and eclipses; principles of light and telescopes. Current films of the planets and their moons, demos and other multimedia activities will enhance the course. The latest Hubble, Spitzer, Chandra and other modern satellite images will supplement the course. Discovery of more than 400 planets orbiting other stars will be discussed and related to the creation of our own solar system.

1060  The Universe (3) Cross listed as ASTR 1060. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Modern astronomy--central theme will be modern science's attempt to understand the nature and origin of the universe at large, including the matter and radiation that make it up. Specific topics include stars, exotic stellar objects (white dwarfs, red giants, neutron stars and black holes), supernova explosions, the origin of atomic elements, galaxies, giant radio sources, quasars, clusters of galaxies, the fabric of space and time, and Big Bang cosmology.

1080  Does Extraterrestrial Intelligence Exist? (3) Cross listed as ASTR 1080. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Most arguments for the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) rest on the Principle of Mediocrity, which asserts that on the cosmic scale there is nothing special about either the earth or the human beings who inhabit it- so intelligent extraterrestrials ought to exist. We will discuss the possibility of finding them by radio searches currently in progress, or by direct contact via future space exploration. If we're nothing special, then ETIs should have developed millions of solar systems long before ours did and the presence should already be known to us. Yet, we've never seen a single shred of evidence to support the existence of ETI, so where are they? This seemingly innocuous question represents a paradox whose scientific and philosophical implications will be fully explored. We will make reasonable estimates of the number of ETIs that co-inhabit our galaxy based upon our current understanding of cosmology, stellar and planetary evolution, anthropology, the nature of life, and evolutionary processes that have produced the human species, the probable sociology and philosophy of intelligent civilizations, and the possible evolution of noncarbon-based ETI. If we conclude that the number of ETIs is small then we must explain the uniqueness of our existence, given the Principle of Mediocrity. But, if we conclude that the number is large, then we must ask the question, so where are they? Either conclusion has profound consequences for the continued existence of the human species. All speculation is based on sound scientific principles and current theories and facts drawn from a highly diverse set of scientific principles.

1090  Introduction to the Tools of Scientific Computing (2)
   Introduction to scientific computing on the Physics Department UNIX workstations: spreadsheets, text editing, computer algebra, elementary programming, scientific report writing, and Internet resources.

1330  Physics of Audio and Video (Analog to Digital) (3) Fulfills Applied Science.
   Principles of physics are illustrated through application to hi-fidelity sound reproduction systems. Concepts are presented with demonstrations rather than mathematical analysis. Topics include waves and interference, resonant frequencies, sound quality and intensity, wow and flutter, electricity and magnetism, and harmonic analysis. Laboratory demonstrations include loudspeakers, sound amplifiers, and tuners.

1500  Prep for College or University Physics (3)
   A one-semester preparation for one of the introductory physics sequences starting with 2010, 2110, 2210. Covers mechanics; electricity and magnetism, wave motion; and light. The course emphasized problem-solving techniques and a particular format for working and presenting problems. No formal prerequisites, but basic knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required.

1809  Elementary General Physics Laboratory (1) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2210. Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2220.
   Teaches basic laboratory skills needed by engineers. Measurement, data analysis, computer graphics display, experimental design and report writing, experimental procedures and results. Experiments in mechanics and electricity and magnetism. Laboratory designed to accompany the PHYS 2210 and PHYS 2220 sequence.

1905  Einstein's Legacy: physics in the 20th century...and beyond (3) Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Consideration of Einstein's life and thought allows us to address some of humanity's most persistent and profound concerns: the nature of space and time, the structure and evolution of the Universe, war and peace, the role of the individual in society. We will discuss Einstein's great contributions to modern physics, as well as his role as a citizen-scientist on the world stage. We will conclude by examining the exciting implication of Einstein's ideas for 21st century science, including black holes, gravitational wave astronomy, dark energy, and the origin of the Universe itself.

1970  Undergraduate Seminar I (1 to 3)

1980  Undergraduate Seminar II (1 to 3)

2010  General Physics I (4) Prerequisite: MATH 1050 and 1060. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   For students of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, humanities, and behavioral and social sciences. Three lectures and two recitations weekly. Mechanics and heat. Those wishing to take this course as a lecture-laboratory course should register concurrently for PHYS 2019.

2015  General Physics Laboratory I (1) Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2010 or 2110.
   Laboratory experiences in mechanics and thermal physics to accompany PHYS 2010 or 2110.

2020  General Physics II (4) Prerequisite: MATH 1050 and 1060. Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Second semester of physics for students of health occupations, humanities, and behavioral and social sciences. Three lectures and two recitations weekly. Heat, electricity, and magnetism; waves, sound, light, and modern physics. Those wishing to take this course as a lecture-laboratory course should register concurrently for PHYS 2025.

2025  General Physics Laboratory II (1) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2010 or 2110 and 2019.
   Continuation of PHYS 2015. Electric circuits, electronic instrumentation, computer interfacing, and optics.

2060  Popular Observational Astronomy (3) Cross listed as ASTR 2060. Prerequisites: Elementary Algebra, PHYS 1060 or 1070.
   This course will serve as an introduction to the tools and techniques used in optical and radio astronomy. Using the facilities at the University of Utah Observatory, we will explore the cosmos and study the Sun, planets, asteroids, stars and galaxies. Measurements of basic properties of astronomical objects will be performed. Quantitative analysis of these measurements will enable us to determine such things as the mass of jupiter as well as the ages of stars.

2110  General Physics with Calculus I (4) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 1210.
   For students planning to attend professional schools requiring college physics preparation and who want to learn physics in greater depth than is possible in a non-calculus physics sequence. Three lectures and two recitations weekly. Students may be required to have use of a high-powered hand calculator.

2120  General Physics with Calculus II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2110.
   Second semester of physics for students planning to attend professional schools requiring college physics preparation and who want to learn physics in greater depth than is possible in a non-calculus physics sequence. Three lectures and two recitations weekly. Students may be required to have use of a high-powered hand calculator.

2210  Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (4) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 1210.
   Three lectures and two recitations weekly. Designed to give science and engineering students a thorough understanding of the basic physical laws and their consequences. Classic mechanics will be introduced, including methods of energy, momentum, angular momentum, and Newtonian gravity. Applications will include mechanical oscillations, sound, and wave motion. Those engineering students who have not had calculus before (high school or college-level course), need to see an engineering advisor.

2215  Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers I (1) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210.
   Teaches laboratory skills needed by scientists and engineers. Measurement, data analysis, computer graphics display, experimental design and report writing, experimental procedures and results. Experiments in mechanics and waves. Laboratory designed to accompany PHYS 2210.

2220  Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (4) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 and MATH 1220.
   Three lectures and two recitations weekly. The continuation of PHYS 2210. Electrostatics, electric fields, and potential. Magnetic fields and Faraday's law. Current flow, resistance, capacitance and inductance. Electric circuits and electromagnetic oscillations. Electromagnetic waves, geometric and physical optics.

2225  Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers II (1) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 and 2219. Recommended Co-requisite: PHYS 2220.
   Continuation of PHYS 2215. Standing waves, sounds, electric circuits, electronic instrumentation, and optics. Some modern physics.

2500  Foundations of Astronomy (3) Cross listed as ASTR 2500. Prerequisite: MATH 1250 or equivalent; PHYS 2110/2210/3210 or equivalent.
   This Foundations course provides an introduction to the breadth of Astronomy through the use of astronomical examples to reinforce physical concepts such as distance scales, magnitudes, mass, velocity, temperature, pressure and angular momentum. Topics include the celestial sphere, coordinate systems, Kepler's Laws, orbits, eclipses, tides, emission and absorption spectra, astronomical detection of light, telescopes, the Sun, properties of stars, our Galaxy, and galaxies.

2790  Science on Stage (3)
   In this course, we bring together the human experience of the scientist with its public perception as embodied in theatre. After all, what is more dramatic than the excitement (and terror) of discovery, that moment when the earth seems to shift beneath one's feet and everything appears changes? Playwrights have seen an explosion of new plays about science and scientists. science on Stage explores the range of science plays now available, with a particular interest in understanding how they reflect the public understanding of science, as well as understanding the science and theatre history that informs the play' content and form. Students will read plays on a variety of scientific, cultural, and theatrical terms. Throughout the semester, students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams to discuss and synthesize course material in the conception of an original live performance event about science.

3060  Intro to Astrophysics (3) Cross listed as ASTR 3060. Prerequisite: PHYS 2500 or ASTR 2500.
   An introductory course in astrophysics including observational astronomy (celestial coordinates, astronomical instruments, stellar magnitudes and spectra) and stellar astrophysics (radiation and energy transport, stellar evolution, star formation). Discusses novae and supernovae, white dwarves, neutron stars, and black holes. The course will introduce concepts of statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, special relativity and general relativity as needed to help explore the course topics.

3110  Physics of the Human Body (3) Recommended Prerequisite: Either both PHYS 2010 and 2020 or both PHYS 2110 and 2120 or both 2210 and 2220. Fulfills Applied Science.
   This interesting course combines physics with anatomy and physiology to tell the story of how the body operates. We cover food and energy metabolism, how trauma occurs in the body. We discuss the meaning of blood pressure how the heart and lungs operate. We cover how we hear, how we see and how x-rays and MRI scans work. There will be lectures on cancer treatment as well as how a person is injured skiing and riding mountain bikes. With each subject we discuss common diseases and treatments.

3111  Physics of the Body II (4) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220, PHYS 3110, CHEM 2320, BIOL 2020
   A comprehensive capstone survey of science governing systems of the human body, particularly suited for students preparing for the medical profession, integrating material drawn from undergraduate courses in physics, biology, and chemistry. Problem solving strategies in medical applications are emphasized.

3150  Energy and Sustainability: A Global Perspective (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2010 or 2020 or 2110 or 2120, and MATH 1210. Fulfills International Requirement.
   An introduction to the global issues of environment and sustainability for students in science and engineering. This course addresses the relationship between energy use and the environment through the fundamental laws of physics. This quantitative course is meant to provide a scientific foundation for understanding the energetic and environmental issues facing our country and world so that students can make informed contributions to the ever-evolving debate surrounding this important global issue.

3160  Renewable Energy in Costa Rica (3)
   This course will be offered as part of a study abroad program in Costa Rica. (The program also includes a course in Anthropology.) PHYS 3160 cannot be applied toward a major or minor in Physics. The course will provide a general overview of current technologies, status, and prospects for five specific renewable energy sources in Costa Rica: hydro-energy, geothermal, biomass, wind and solar. More information provided in course syllabus.

3210  Physics for Scientists I (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 1210.
   Introductory physics for students planning graduate studies in physics or related field. Mechanics, sound, and wave motion. Preprofessional program.

3220  Physics for Scientists II (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3210 and MATH 1220.
   Second semester of introductory physics for students planning graduate studies in physics or related field. Electromagnetism and optics. Preprofessional program.

3330  Digital Audio and Video (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2010 and 2020 or equivalent 2-semester physics series.
   A course which covers the physics phenomena used in digital audio and video recording and playback. Recent advances in this area have opened the international scene, as to communications and exchange of cultural aspects, and they invite a study of the science involved.

3375  Women in Physics and Their Scientific Contributions (3) Prerequisite: MATH 1210, HONOR 2201 or equivalent (Calculus). Fulfills Diversity & Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   Meets with HONOR 3375. This course will make a survey of the lives and works of important women physicists of the past. We will start with the first woman faculty member in a European university: Laura Bassi (University of Bologna, 1732). Others to be included are Curie, Meitner, Franklin, Wu. The course will attempt to teach, mostly at a conceptual level, the basic physics topics associated with the achievements of these women, and to seek to place their contributions in the larger context of the advent of Modern science and Technology.

3410  Modern Optics I & II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2220.
   Wave optics and application of lasers, and modern optical instrumentation and techniques.

3411  Modern Optics I (2) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2220.
   Essentials of geometric optics.

3610  Electronics for Scientific Instrumentation (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2229 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 6610. Basic components and introductory integrated-circuit electronics. Noise and noise reduction. Transmission lines.

3620  Data Acquisition for Scientific Instrumentation (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2229 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 6620. Use of PCs in data collection and analysis, and in process control; interfacing to real-world equipment; sophisticated 32-bit processors used; hardware and software treated.

3680  Scientific Writing & Speaking (3)
   Students will learn writing and speaking skills appropriate for careers in technical fields. The course will emphasize general skills that are important for scientific writing and speaking. Students will also learn skills that are specific to future careers in physics and related professions.

3719  Undergraduate Laboratory (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3740 . Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Transformative experiments in the development of the modern era in physics, including measurement of some fundamental constants of the universe, will be used as vehicles to test models of physical behavior. Students will be introduced to the craft of experimental design with a focus on optimizing data-taking and analysis to understand the sources and significance of errors. Critical thinking skills will be honed through qualitative and quantitative justification of results.

3729  Physics Undergraduate Laboratory (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3740.
   Meets with PHYS 3719. Individual experiments in classical and modern physics. This is the honors version of PHYS 3719. Completion of additional material and/or assignments will be required for credit. Transformative experiments in the development of the modern era in physics, including measurement of some fundamental constants of the universe, will be used as vehicles to test models of physical behavior. Students will be introduced to the craft of experimental design with a focus on optimizing data-taking and analysis to understand the sources and significance of errors. Critical thinking skills will be honed through qualitative and quantitative justification of results.

3730  Introduction to Computing in Physics (4)
   Meets with PHYS 6720. Brief introduction to computing tools for science and engineering work on modern workstations. Topics include Unix (file structures, commands, scripts, etc.), editing (especially with emacs), spreadsheets, technical document preparation (LaTeX, Postcript), symbolic manipulation (Maple), use of library routines (LAPACK), Programming in C++, and organizing large codes with makefiles. These tools will be illustrated by applying them to scientific and engineering problems.

3740  Introduction to Quantum Theory and Relativity (3) Cross listed as ECE 3740. Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 and MATH 2250. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Introduction to Special Relativity: time dilation, length contraction, Lorentz transforms. Introduction to classical and quantum statistics. Maxwell-Beltzman, Fermi-Diraz, Bose-Einstein, Pauli principle with emphasis on relativistic energy and momentum. The quantization of light: Planck black body radiation, the photoelectric effect and x-rays, and Bragg diffraction. Basic quantum ideas: wave-particle duality, uncertainty relations, and wave packets. Introduction to quantum mechanics: Schrodinger equation in one, two, and three dimensions. Squarewells barriers, harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom. Quantum properties of spin and angular momentum: Zeeman effect, Stern-Gerlach experiment, atomic and molecular structure, and covalent bonding. Multi-electron atoms and the Periodic Table. Applications to solid-state physics, particle physics, and nuclear physics per instructor and time permitting.

3760  Principles of Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 and MATH 2250.
   Principles of thermodynamics, including laws of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, entropy,TdS equations, phase transitions, Clapeyron's equation, electric and nuclear magnetism, adiabatic demagnetization, and negative temperatures. Introduction to classical statistical mechanics, basic ideas, simple applications, and the relation of microscopic dynamics to thermodynamics

3910  Basic Applied Electricity and Magnetism (3) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   In this course topics in advanced undergraduate electricity and magnetism (cf.PHYS 4420) are covered with an emphasis on the connection to technology. The course is taught with an innovative approach in which lectures, laboratories, and computation are integrated.

3920  Basic Applied Modern Physics (3) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   In this course topics in undergraduate quantum mechanics, solid state physics, and thermal physics are covered with an emphasis on the connection to technology. The course is taught with an innovative approach in which lectures, laboratories, and computation are integrated.

3949  Special Laboratory Topics in Physics (1 to 4)

3970  Special Reading Topics in Physics (1 to 4)

4060  Observational Astronomy for Scientists (3) Cross listed as ASTR 4060. Prerequisites: Familiarity with computers, PHYS 1060 or PHYS 1070, and PHYS 2220.
   This course will serve as an introduction to the tools and techniques used in optical and radio astronomy. Using the facilities at the University of Utah Observatory, we will explore the cosmos and study the Sun, planets, asteroids, stars and galaxies. Measurements of basic properties of astronomical objects will be performed. Quantitative analysis of these measurements will enable us to determine such things as the mass of jupiter as well as the ages of stars.

4080  Introduction to Cosmology (3) Cross listed as ASTR 4080. Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 or equiv, PHYS 3760, 4420, 3740 or equivalent.
   An introductory course which explores modern cosmological concepts. Discusses formation of galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, the expansion and the age of the Universe. Topics include the existence and properties of the cosmic microwave background, the origin of the light elements, cosmological inflation, and the role of dark matter and dark energy in the formation and expansion of the Universe. The course will introduce concepts of statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, special and general relativity as needed to explore the course topics.

4210  Optics in Biology (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 6210. The use of optics in biology has evolved from the simple light microscope used by Darwin to the complex cryo-electron and live cell high resolution microscopes used today. With all these advances it can now be argued that we stand at the dawn of quantitative biology and optics provides an essential tool in this pursuit. This course is designed to give students a good understanding of physics involved in advanced optics while focusing their attention on the biological problems amenable to these techniques. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry or physics are equally encouraged however knowing algebra is a requirement for taking this course. Each section of the course would deal specifically with a special kind of microscopy followed with a case study in a biological problem that is most amenable to the use of the techniques discussed.

4230  Properties and Functions of Processive Molecular Motors (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 or consent of instructor.
   Meets with PHYS 6230 and 6231. This course will provide an overview of microtubule and actin-based motors: their structure, their function (including topics of motor regulation,) and the quantitative approaches used to study and model motor activity. Students with back grounds in biology or physics are equally encouraged. The class will outline the biological context of motoractivity, discuss motor families and details of their mechano-chemical activity, and further cover measurement and modeling techniques as well as related advanced topics.

4310  Physics in Biology (1) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 4310. This course is designed to give students a good understanding of Physics involved in biological processes. The goal is to equip students with analytical tools that would enable them to tackle biological problems in new ways. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry and physics are equally encouraged however knowing basic calculus is a requirement for taking this course.

4410  Classical Physics I (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3220 and MATH 2250. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Advanced undergraduate mechanics, relativity, preprofessional program.

4420  Classical Physics II (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 4410. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Advanced undergraduate electricity and magnetism, preprofessional program.

4800  Undergraduate Research (Honors) (1 to 6)
   This course is for undergraduate physics majors who are doing faculty directed research. Since variable credit is assigned to the course, students must meet with the faculty research supervisor of the project to establish credit hours before registering for the class. This course does not substitute for required primary curricula.

4910  Technical Communication & Scientific Judgement (Honors) (4) Prerequisite: Department consent required. Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   Skills needed for approaching and communicating technical problems. Technical writing, oral presentation, statistical analysis, preparation of proposals, collaborative work, etc.

4999  Senior Honors Project (1 to 3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

5010  Theoretical Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 or 3220 and MATH 3150. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Applied program: advanced undergraduate mechanics, electrostatics, and magnetostatics.

5015  Observational Methods and Data Analysis (3) Cross listed as ASTR 5015. Prerequisite: Computer programming; ASTR/PHYS 3060 or ASTR/PHYS graduate standing.
   This course provides an introduction to professional observational astronomy skills: instrumentation in optical astronomy, analysis of data and image processing, and observational techniques. Using real data, the student will develop the ability to plan observations and produce a final scientific result. The course will emphasize the capabilities and limitations of optical observations, and provide insight into current research.

5020  Theoretical Electricity and Magnetism and Statistical Physics (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 5010 and 3740. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Applied program: advanced undergraduate electrodynamics and elementary quantum mechanics.

5070  Physics Teaching Methods (3)
   Discussion, development, performance, and evaluation of science teaching activities with emphasis on physical concepts and ideas. Intense student participation involving simple experimental materials and classroom simulations.

5110  Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3740 or equivalent. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Intended for scientists, engineers, and students completing a Physics minor. An introduction to nuclear physics, including issues related to energy production and radiation safety and to elementary particle physics with emphasis on key discoveries and outstanding questions.

5150  Energy & sustainability-A Global Perspective (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2010 or 2020 or 2110 or 2120, and MATH 1210.
   This course will be offered as a graduate section addition to PHYS 3150. It will be part of the Environmental Science Track of the Professional Masters Program . The course will provide a general overview of the global issues of environment and sustainability for students in science and engineering. Current technologies, status, and prospects of energy production, distribution, and consumption will be discussed. The graduate section will include an additional scientific article and a 45 minute seminar to be completed by each graduate student.

5285  Biological Microscopy Laboratory (1 to 3) Cross listed as BIOL 5285.
   Individual student project that applies microscopy techniques covered in BIOL 5280 to a problem in biology.

5410  Physics Core of Modern Technology and Life Science (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 3740.
   This course will teach students how to apply the laws of classicla physical disciplines to understand properties of real objects, devices, and structures. Students will strengthen their competency in physics by going through examples in technology and life science that are important and appealing but at the same time can be reduced to physical models tractable at the undergraduate level. Some of the topics include lasers, nuclear magnetic resonance, and optical tweezers.

5450  Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 4420 and MATH 2250 and 3150 and 3160.
   Basic ideas and techniques of quantum mechanics, Preprofessional program.

5460  Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics (Honors) (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 5450.
   Continuation of topics in Quantum Mechanics and an introduction to classical and quantum statistical mechanics. Preprofessional program.

5510  Solid-State Physics I (Honors) (3) Prerequisite: CHEM 3060 and PHYS 3740 or equivalent.
   Introductory survey of solid-state physics for senior and first- and second-year graduate students in science and engineering.

5520  Solid-State Physics II (Honors) (3)
   Continuation of PHYS 5510.

5530  Introduction to Disordered Solids (Honors) (3) Recommended Prerequisite: Physics 5510 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
   This course is designed to follow a one semester 5000 level introduction to solid state physics. The course should be of interest to a wide range of students studying disordered solids, including those in Materials Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Bioengineering, and Chemistry. It will cover general material properties and calculational methods that transcend individual material systems.

5570  Galactic Astronomy and Stellar Populations (3) Cross listed as ASTR 5570. Prerequisite: PHYS 3740/CHEM 3060; ASTR/PHYS 3060 or PHYS/ASTR graduate standing.
   A core Astronomy course. Comprehensive survey of the components of the Milky Way, how astronomers have employed observations to infer its structure and extent, and how observations and analysis of stellar population have led to some of the most exciting astronomical discoveries made in the last century (and continue to be made today). Topics include an overview of the Milky Way as a galaxy (size, shape, age); astronomical measurements (positions, distances, magnitudes, colors); mapping the Milky Way (structures, kinematics, interstellar medium); stellar populations; formation and evolution of the Milky Way (stellar dynamics, chemical evolution); origin and distribution of the elements.

5580  Cosmology (3) Cross listed as ASTR 5580. Prerequisite: PHYS 3740, 3760, 4410, 4420 and MATH 2250 or equivalent.
   A core course intended for graduate students of astronomy and physics. The course explores the theory and observational evidence of modern cosmology. The course is self-contained and includes brief reviews of general relativity and other background physics and mathematics required to understand cosmology. The course will talk about basic equations describing the universe, the expansion and age of the universe, dark matter and dark energy, the thermal history of the universe, the origin of the light elements, and the blackbody spectra of the cosmic microwave background. The course will also cover topics about the origin of structures in the universe, including cosmological density field, growth of density perturbation, inflation, anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, galaxy formation, and comic reionization. Finally contemporary observational techniques to constrain cosmological parameters will be discussed.

5590  Stellar Astrophysics and Compact Objects (Honors) (3) Cross listed as ASTR 5590. Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3760, 4420, 3740, or equivalent.
   A core course which develops a physical methodology to understand the origin and evolution of stars. Discusses formation of stars, stellar evolution, star clusters, novae and supernovae, white dwarves, neutron stars, and black holes. Topics include Cepheid variables, Wolf-Rayet Stars, binary stellar systems and accretion disks.

5719  Fundamental Lab Techniques (2 to 3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 or consent of instructor.
   Lab safety, etiquette, chemical practices, wiring, compressed gases, cryogenic liquids, principles and practice of vacuum systems, thermodynamics of chemistry and material science, temperature measurement and control. Numerous demonstrations will illuminate concepts. Experiments will give students hands-on experience with concepts and techniques.

5739  Scanning Electron Microscopy (3 to 4) Cross listed as MET E 5739. Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 & CHEM 1210 or consent of instructor.
   The SEM: capabilities, advantages and limitations. Electron sources, electron optics and detectors. Components of the electron microscope, their principles of operation and failure modes. Image quality, optimization and interpretation. Decision tree and analytical strategies for microscopy. Review of atomic physics and characteristic x-ray emission. Principles and operation of instrumentation for elemental analysis by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, discussion of pitfalls and strategies. Low vacuum, ESEM and Focused Ion Beam. Lectures are based on lab exercises.

5810  Nanoscience: Where Biology, Chemistry and Physics Intersect (3) Cross listed as BIOL 5810, CHEM 5810, CH EN 5810.
   An introduction to the emerging fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Concepts from biology, chemistry and physics will be used to explore the special features of phenomena at the nanometer scale, and current developments in the design and construction of nanoscale devices will be discussed. Course requirements include a research paper.

6071  Science Teaching Methods (Elem) (2)
   One week workshop intended for practicing elementary teachers. This course will focus on the physical science elements of the Utah State Core Curriculum in elementary grades. The course is designed as an intensive one-week summer workshop. In particular, the targeted areas addressed will be those specific items in physical science taught in Utah's public schools as required by the core curriculum document. In addition, emphasis will also be placed on the prefatory document in the core curriculum entitled "Intended Learning Outcomes" in terms of the development of course materials and how they are to be used by the participants in the course in their own classrooms. An additional focus of the course will be creative problem solving in which course participants will learn how to couch numerous science lessons as problem solving opportunities for their students. Course structure is essentially lab oriented occasionally punctuated with short lectures, participant presentations, problem-solving sessions, computer-related opportunities, and interactive exchange sessions.

6072  Science Teaching Methods (Elem) (3)
   Two week workshop intended for practicing elementary teachers. This course will focus on the physical science elements of the Utah State Core Curriculum in elementary grades. The course is designed as an intensive one-week summer workshop. In particular, the targeted areas addressed will be those specific items in physical science taught in Utah's public schools as required by the core curriculum document. In addition, emphasis will also be placed on the prefatory document in the core curriculum entitled "Intended Learning Outcomes" in terms of the development of course materials and how they are to be used by the participants in the course in their own classrooms. An additional focus of the course will be creative problem solving in which course participants will learn how to couch numerous science lessons as problem solving opportunities for their students. Course structure is essentially lab oriented occasionally punctuated with short lectures, participant presentations, problem-solving sessions, computer-related opportunities, and interactive exchange sessions.

6073  Science Teaching Methods (Sec) (2)
   One week workshop intended for practicing secondary teachers. This course will focus on the physical science elements of the Utah State Core Curriculum as they pertain to the physical sciences in the secondary grades. The course is designed as an intensive one-week summer workshop. In particular, the targeted areas addressed will be those specific items in physical science taught in Utah's public schools as required by the core curriculum document for those grades. In addition, emphasis will also be placed on the prefatory document in the core curriculum entitled "Intended Learning Outcomes" in terms of the development of course materials and how they are to be used by the participants in the course in their own classrooms. An additional focus of the course will be creative problem solving in which course participants will learn how to couch numerous science lessons as problem solving opportunities for their students. Course structure is essentially lab oriented occasionally punctuated with short lectures, participant presentations, problem-solving sessions, computer-related opportunities, and interactive exchange sessions.

6074  Science Teaching Methods (Sec) (3)
   Two week workshop intended for practicing secondary teachers. This course will focus on the physical science elements of the Utah State Core Curriculum as they pertain to the physical sciences in the secondary grades. The course is designed as an intensive one-week summer workshop. In particular, the targeted areas addressed will be those specific items in physical science taught in Utah's public schools as required by the core curriculum document for those grades. In addition, emphasis will also be placed on the prefatory document in the core curriculum entitled "Intended Learning Outcomes" in terms of the development of course materials and how they are to be used by the participants in the course in their own classrooms. An additional focus of the course will be creative problem solving in which course participants will learn how to couch numerous science lessons as problem solving opportunities for their students. Course structure is essentially lab oriented occasionally punctuated with short lectures, participant presentations, problem-solving sessions, computer-related opportunities, and interactive exchange sessions.

6110  Theoretical Mechanics (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 4410 and 4420.
   Advance theoretical mechanics.

6210  Optics in Biology (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 4210. The use of optics in biology has evolved from the simple light microscope used by Darwin to the complex cryo-electron and live cell high resolution microscopes used today. With all these advances it can now be argued that we stand at the dawn of quantitative biology and optics provides an essential tool in this pursuit. This course is designed to give students a good understanding of physics involved in advanced optics while focusing their attention on the biological problems amenable to these techniques. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry or physics are equally encouraged however knowing algebra is a requirement for taking this course. Each section of the course would deal specifically with a special kind of microscopy followed with a case study in a biological problem that is most amenable to the use of the techniques discussed.

6211  Optics in Biology (2) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 and permission of instructor. Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 4910.
   Meets with PHYS 4210 and 6210. This is a half-semester course (2-credits). This course is designed to give students a good understanding of physics involved in advanced optics while focusing their attention on the biological problems amenable to these techniques. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry or physics are equally encouraged.

6230  Properties and Functions of Processive Molecular Motors (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2220 or consent of instructor.
   Meets with PHYS 4230 and 6231. This course will provide an overview of microtubule and actin-based motors: their structure, their function (including topics of motor regulation,) and the quantitative approaches used to study and model motor activity. Students with back grounds in biology or physics are equally encouraged. The class will outline the biological context of motoractivity, discuss motor families and details of their mechano-chemical activity, and further cover measurement and modeling techniques as well as related advanced topics.

6231  Biology of Processive Molecular Motors (2)
   Meets with PHYS 4230 and 6230. This course will provide an overview of the structure and biological function of microtubule and actin-based motors (including topics of motor regulation,). Students with back grounds in biology or physics are equally encouraged. The class will outline the biological context of motor activity, discuss motor families and details of their mechano-chemical activity as well as related advanced topics.

6310  Physics in Biology (1) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210 & 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 4310. This course is designed to give students a good understanding of Physics involved in biological processes. The goal is to equip students with analytical tools that would enable them to tackle biological problems in new ways. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry and physics are equally encouraged however knowing basic calculus is a requirement for taking this course.

6510  Physics of Semiconductors I (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 5460 and 5520.
   Semiconductor theory and recent developments.

6520  Physics of Semiconductors II (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 6510.
   Continuation of PHYS 6510.

6610  Electronics for Scientific Instrumentation (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2229 and 2220.
   Meets with PHYS 3610. Basic components and introductory integrated circuit electronics. Noise and noise reduction. Transmission lines.

6620  Data Acquisition for Scientific Instrumentation (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2229 and 2220 and 5610.
   Meets with PHYS 3620. Use of PCs in data collection and analysis, and in process control; interfacing to real-world equipment; sophisticated 32-bit processors used; hardware and software treated.

6710  Technical Communication and Scientific Judgment (4) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Meets with PHYS 4910. This course teaches skills needed for approaching and communicating technical problems; technical writing, oral presentation, statistical analysis, preparation of proposals, collaborative work, etc.

6719  Graduate Laboratory (3)
   Graduate research lab techniques and procedures.

6720  Introduction to Computing in Physics (4)
   Meets with PHYS 3730. Brief introduction to computing tools for science and engineering work on modern workstations. Topics include Unix (file structures, commands, scripts, etc.), editing (especially with emacs), spreadsheets, technical document preparation (LaTeX, Postcript), symbolic manipulation (Maple), use of library routines (LAPACK), Programming in C++, and organizing large codes with makefiles. These tools will be illustrated by applying them to scientific and engineering problems.

6730  Computational Physics 2 (4) Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 3150 and 3160 and either PHYS 3730, 6720 or CP SC 3200.
   Survey of modern numerical methods with programming exercises in C++ and Maple on Unix workstations. Topics include root finding, solving linear systems by direct and iterative methods, eigenvalue problems, interpolation and extrapolation, differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, elementary statistics, linear and nonlinear optimization, Fourier transforms.

6740  Computational Physics II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 6730.
   Statistics: Maximum-likelihood nonlinear optimization and advanced data fitting; wavelet transforms, Monte Carlo integration, Monte Carlo simulation, partial differential equations, parallel computation.

6750  Applied Modern Optics I & II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2220.
   Polarization, coherence, interference, and diffraction phenomena. Fourier transform spectroscopy, intensity correlation interferometry, spatial filtering, and holography. Selected topics on lasers, light scattering, and quantum optics as time permits.

6751  Modern Optics I (2) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 2220.
   Essentials of geometric optics.

6760  Physical Measurement and Sensor Systems (4) Recommended Prerequisite: Engineering Physics sequence or instructor's consent.
   Physical principles and practical use of modern sensors and measurement systems. Quantitative characterization of measurement systems, noise reduction, statistical analysis of measurement data. Physical basis for various types of measurement sensors including: mechanical (position, velocity, acceleration, force, pressure, strain), thermal (temperature, thermal expansion, thermoelectric, thermoresistive), electric (capacitive, piezoelectric) and magnetic (Hall, NMR, superconductive). Laboratory provides hands on experience with these sensors and measurement systems.

6770  Optical Measurement Techniques and Instrumentation (3) Prerequisite: PHYS 2210, 2220, 3410.
   Physical principles and practical use of optical measurement techniques and instrumentation. Photodetectors, lasers, optical ranging, interferometry, acousto-optic modulation, ellipsometry, optical pyrometry, optical spectroscopy, fibers and optical microscopy. Topics include fundamental sensing limits, noise sources, system characterization, error analysis, signal averaging/filtering, impedance loading, and frequency/time analysis. Laboratory provides hands on experience with these optical techniques and measurement systems.

6771  Ionizing Radiation (2) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 3740 or equivalent.
   Sources of radiation, interaction of radiation with matter, biological effects and tolerances of radiation, uses of radioactive substances; properties of gaseous, organic, and inorganic radiation detectors; time of flight, range, and other experimental techniques.

6775  Optical Measurement Techniques and Instrumentation Laboratory (2) Prerequisite: PHYS 6770.
   The purpose of this lab class is to enable the students to handle optical equipment and to apply the knowledge that they have acquired in the PHYS 6770 class. The laboratory contains seven experiments which last between one and two weeks. Among the equipment that is used for these experiments are: Photodetectors, lasers, interferometers, acousto-optic modulators, ellipsometers, optical spectoscopes, optical fibers, lock-in amplifiers.

6800  Physics Colloquium (M.S.) (2) Prerequisite: Must be a student of the Physics M.S. degree program.
   Weekly colloquia and reports on presentations.

6810  Graduate Seminar: Master's (1 to 2)

6849  Physics Masters Project (1 to 12)

6859  Instrumentation Project (1 to 9)
   Development, testing, and calibration of an instrumentation system. Student chooses and develops project in consultation with faculty (in or out of department). Project may be in connection with student employment or other interests, or suggested by local industry.

6910  Advanced Applied Electricity and Magnetism (4) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   In this course topics in advanced electricity and magnetism (cf. PYHS 7110) are covered with an emphasis on the confection to technology. The course is taught with an innovative approach in which lectures, laboratories, and computation are integrated.

6920  Advanced Applied Modern Physics (4) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Advanced topics in quantum mechanics, solid state physics, and thermal physics are covered with an emphasis on the connection to technology. The course is taught with an innovative approach in which lectures, laboratories, and computation are integrated.

6950  Special Reading Topics: Master's (1 to 6)

6970  Thesis Research: Master's (1 to 12)

6980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 12)

7110  Electrodynamics I (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 4410 and 4420.

7120  Electrodynamics II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7110.
   Continuation of PHYS 7110.

7130  Radiative Processes (4) Cross listed as ASTR 7130. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Physics and Astronomy.
   Our knowledge about celestial objects and the universe is largely obtained by observations of electromagnetic radiation. This course will provide students a working knowledge of the fundamental processes related to radiation and the applications in astrophysics, including topics on the generation, propagation, and scattering of radiation. This research-oriented course focuses on providing physical insights into radiative processes. The goal is to give students a solid background in radiative physical processes, and to apply it to research work. This course has 4 credit hours. PHYS/ASTR 7130 fulfills the same degree requirements as PHYS 7120 and may be taken as a substitute for PHYS 7120. Students are expected to have a background in intermediate electromagnetic theory, introductory quantum mechanics, basics of special relativity, and some statistical mechanics.

7220  Quantum Theory I (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 5450 and 5460 and 7110.
   Nonrelativistic and relativistic quantum theory with applications to atoms, molecules, scattering, and radiation.

7230  Quantum Theory II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7220.
   Continuation of PHYS 7220.

7310  Statistical Mechanics (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7220.

7510  Advanced Solid-State Physics I (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7230 and 5520.
   Subjects of PHYS 551, 552 at more advanced theoretical level. Group theory, second quantization, elementary excitations, and many-body techniques applied to areas of solid-state physics important in current research.

7520  Advanced Solid-State Physics II (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7510.
   Continuation of PHYS 7510.

7530  Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7120 and 7230.
   The fundamental concepts and experimental techniques of NMR. Topics include the Bloch equations, quantum mechanical treatment of nuclear spins in static and time-dependent magnetic fields, the spin echo, dipolar broadening of resonance lines, spin-lattice relaxation, spin temperature, nuclear quadrupole resonance, double resonance, and applications to selected problems in solid-state physics and medical physics.

7550  Physical Applications of Group Theory (3)
   Group theory applied to molecules and solids.

7640  Quantum Field Theory I (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7220 and 7230.
   Introduction to quantum field theory and second quantization. Nonrelativistic applications and quantum electrodynamics.

7650  Quantum Field Theory II (3) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 7640.
   Continuation of PHYS 7640. Path integral spontaneous symmetry breaking, quantum chromodynamics and renormalization group.

7720  General Relativity and Relativistic Astrophysics (3)

7730  Statistical and Computational Methods in Physics & Astronomy (4) Cross listed as ASTR 7730. Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 5810.
   A survey of mathematical, statistical and computational methods of analyzing and modeling phenomena in astrophysics, biophysics, and physics in general. The goal is to connect observational data with underlying physical processes through numerical simulations, analytic approximations, and statistical analyses. Subjects in statistics include parameter estimation, Fisher information and correlators; numerical topics include large matrix processing, data visualization and Monte Carlo methods and dynamical modeling; analytical methods include series and asymptotic approximations to functions and symbolic programming on computers. Case studies, tuned to student research interests in physics and astronomy, provide examples.

7740  Mathematical Methods of Physics I (4) Recommended Prerequisite: MATH 2210 and 2250 and 3150 and 3160.
   Advanced mathematics and its application to problem-solving. Topics include: complex analysis, differential equations, special functions, linear algebra.

7750  Mathematical Methods of Physics II (4) Recommended Prerequisite: PHYS 6740.
   Continuation of PHYS 7740. Advanced mathematics and its application to problem-solving. Topics include: variational calculus, tensor calculus, group representations.

7800  Physics Colloquium (Ph.D.) (2) Prerequisite: Ph.D. students only.
   Weekly colloquia and reports on presentations.

7810  Graduate Seminar for Ph.D. Students (1 to 2)
   Attend seminar program including Physics Department Colloquia.

7910  Special Reading Topics: Ph.D. (1 to 6)

7970  Thesis Research: Ph.D. (1 to 12)

7980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 12)

7990  Continuing Registration: Ph.D. (0)


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