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General Catalog Fall 2012
Posted Mar 02, 2012

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2012, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

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1800  Contemporary Materials Science and Engineering (1)
   Introduces the student to materials science and engineering, including contemporary materials issues facing practicing engineers and scientists. This is accomplished through field trips to local materials companies and through speakers familiar with materials science and engineering.

1801  Contemporary Materials Science & Engineering II (1)
   Continuation of MSE 1800 with further emphasis on design. Based on the material taught in MSE 1800, students will focus on a materials science and engineering design project from conception to completion. Students will learn communication skills, team work skills, utilize graphical and visual representation and thinking, build a prototype and use critical thinking as they trouble shoot and test a prototype.

2010  Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (4) Prerequisites: Intermediate or Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This is an introduction course for Materials Science and Engineering undergraduate students and Biomedical Engineering undergraduate students emphasizing in Biomaterials. The course teaches the fundamental of how to predict the properties of materials based on microstructure. The students will be able to: 1) understand how atomic bonding is related to modulus, melting point, and thermal expansion, 2) differentiate between amorphous and crystalline materials on the basis of x-ray diffraction and crystallinity, 3) predict diffusion in solids and understand how this thermally activated, 4) understand how thermodynamics and kinetics combine to control the processing of advanced materials, 5) apply thermodynamics in understanding phase equilibria, 6) gain a basic understanding of what controls the electrical, optical, and thermal behavior of materials, and 7) be able to understand fundamental design considerations for materials selection. Laboratory experiments will illustrate these principles including work hardening, brittle fracture, and phase transformation. Laboratory safety, methods of literature search, data representation, elementary statistical analysis of data, routine property measurements, and report writing are emphasized.

2160  Elements of Materials Science and Engineering (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (CHEM 1210 AND MATH 1220)
   This is an introduction to materials science and engineering for Mechanical Engineering undergraduate students. The course teaches the fundamentals of how to predict the properties of materials based on microstructure. The students will be able to: 1) understand how atomic bonding is related to modulus, melting point, and thermal expansion, 2) differentiate between amorphous and crystalline materials on the basis of x-ray diffraction and crystallinity, 3) predict diffusion in solids and understand how this is thermally activated, 4) understand how thermodynamics and kinetics combine to control the processing of advanced materials, 5) apply thermodynamics in understanding phase equilibria, 6) gain a basic understanding of what controls the electrical, optical, and thermal behavior of materials, and 7) be able to understand fundamental design considerations for materials selection.

2170  Elements of Materials Science and Engineering (1.5) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (CHEM 1210 AND MATH 1220)
   This is an introduction to materials science and engineering Civil Engineering undergraduate students. It is a half-semester course. The course will teach the fundamentals of how to predict the properties of materials based on microstructure. The students will be able to: 1) understand how atomic bonding is related to modulus, melting point, and thermal expansion, 2) differentiate between amorphous and crystalline materials on the basis of x-ray diffraction and crystallinity, 3) predict diffusion in solids and understand how this is thermally activated, and 4) understand how thermodynamics and kinetics combine to control the processing of advanced materials.

2601  Materials Molding Civilization (3) Fulfills Applied Science.
   Travel in time from the stone age to our modern electronic age. The course will show how the invention and development of new materials has dramatically impacted civilization and human standards of living. Emphasis will be showing how ceramics, metals, plastics, electronic materials, composites and biomaterials dominate every facet of our daily lives.

3010  Materials Processing Laboratory (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This is a laboratory course focused on providing hands on experience in fabricating parts using current materials processing technologies. Students choose two projects lasting a half semester each from various traditional and new materials.

3011  Structural Analysis of Materials (4) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   This course will teach the fundamentals of materials characterization based on atomic bonding, crystallography, and microstructure. The students will be able to: 1) interpret x-ray and electron diffraction patterns, 2) operate a scanning electron microscope and use energy dispersive spectroscopy to identify the elemental analysis of imaged features, 3) identify metals, polymers, ceramics, semiconductors, and composite materials based on their density, crystallinity, thermal expansion, infrared spectra, glass transition temperature or melting point, phase assemblage, and elemental analysis, 4) understand how surface analysis techniques work and be able to select the appropriate technique for characterizing a specific surface, 5) understand how materials analysis is related to the microstructure and properties of a material, 6) solve homework problems and write laboratory report, and 7) demonstrate proficiency through acceptable performance on exams.

3032  Introduction to Thermodynamics (4) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Introduces basic thermodynamic concepts topics include first, second and third laws of thermodynamics, equation of state, free energy functions, ideal van der Waals gases, heat capacity and electrochemistry. The design and use of experimental techniques to illustrate the concepts of thermodynamics will be discussed along with the solution of thermodynamic problems.

3061  Transport Phenomena in Materials Science and Engineering (3) Cross listed as CH EN 3061. Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 2010 AND Intermediate or Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   This course will teach the basic principles of transport phenomena, and provide numerous practical examples that demonstrate 1) application of transport principles to manufacturing of materials, 2) structure, processing, properties, performance relationships for materials.

3210  Electronic Properties of Solids (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in ECE 2200 AND (Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering)
   Theory and applications of electrical conduction, semi conduction, dielectric, magnetic and optical properties of materials. Variation of these properties with composition, temperature, pressure structural and processing. Applications to electrical, electronic magnetic, thermoelectric and optical devices.

3310  Introduction to Ceramics (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This is an introductory course to provide students with a fundamental understanding and working knowledge of the structure-processing-microstructure-property-performance relationship of key ceramic materials in comparison to metals and polymers. Topics include mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic and optical behavior, fabrication processes, design issues, monolithic versus composite ceramics, and important applications/products.

3410  Introduction to Polymers (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This course will provide an overview of polymer materials. It is intended as a first course in polymers for students with a background in material science, chemistry, or general engineering. The emphasis of the course will be on the use of polymer materials as engineering materials. After a brief study of the molecular structure of polymers and the general structure of polymeric solids, the course will then emphasize applications of polymers. At the end of the course, the student should have a wide appreciation of the ways polymers can be used, why and how certain polymers are selected for certain applications, and how polymers are formed or processed into something useful.

4950  Independent Study (1 to 4)

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on an Honors degree.

5011  Adv Mtrls Tech: Experiment, Theory & Characterization (2) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MSE 3010 AND MSE 3011 AND MSE 3210 AND MSE 3310 AND MSE 3410)
   Introduces students to hands on experimentation to modern skills and techniques of materials research and characterization. MSE 5011 spans 10 weeks and is divided into 4 modules each focusing on an essential skill or technique used in materials research and characterization. Each module will be introduced theoretically and then students will gain experience through hands-on labs. MSE 5010 is taught with conjunction with first ten weeks of MSE 6011.

5025  Mechanical Properties of Solids (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Stress-strain behavior, anisotropy and multiaxial stress effects, anelastically, elementary dislocation theory, crystallography of slip, dislocation mechanics, twinning, fundamentals of fracture and fracture mechanics, fatigue, and creep. Introduces students to the general features of mechanical behavior of solid materials.

5032  Advanced Thermodynamics (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MSE 3032 AND MSE 5034) AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This course will cover the following topics: Thermodynamics of liquids & Solids, free energy composition diagrams, phase equilibria in two component and multi-components systems, solid-state & liquid-state electrochemistry, batteries, fuel cells, role of surfaces, topics in non-equilibrium thermodynamics, phenomena far from equilibrium.

5034  Kinetics of Solid-State Processes (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 3032 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Rate theory and diffusion applied to nucleation, crystal growth, grain growth, recrystallization, precipitation, sintering, and solid-state reactions; role of kinetics and thermodynamics in development of mirostructures. Designed to teach undergraduate seniors in materials science and engineering the basic rate and its application to such solid state phenomena as diffusion solidification and transformations in solids involving nucleation and growth, spinodol decomposition, and martensitic transformations. The design of experimental techniques to solve materials-related problems is emphasized.

5040  Introduction to Modern Biomaterials (4) Cross listed as BIOEN 5301. Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MATH 2250 AND PHYS 2210 AND CHEM 2310) AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This course is designed to introduce students to the various classes of biomaterials in use and their application in selected subspecialties of medicine including an understanding of material bulk and surface properties, standard characterization tools, the various biological responses to implanted materials, the clinical context of their use, manufacturing processes, and issues dealing with cost, sterilization, packaging, and design of biomedical devices. It also addresses professional and ethical responsibility encountered in designing medical implants.

5050  Special Topics (1 to 4)

5055  Microsystems Design and Characterization (3) Cross listed as MET E 5055, ME EN 5055, CH EN 5659, ECE 5225. Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Meets with ME EN 6055, BIOEN 6423, ECE 6225, MET E 6055, MSE 6055, CH EN 6659. Third in a 3-course series on Microsystems Engineering. This course generalizes microsystems design considerations with practical emphasis on MEMS and IC characterization/physical analysis. Two lectures, one lab per week, plus 1/2 hour lab lecture. Must also register for ME EN 6056 (0-credit lab with fees).

5071  Intro to NanoBio Technology and NanoBio Materials (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This course introduces the field of nanobio technology, the types and properties of materials used, their interactions with living systems, their applications in technology, sensing and drug delivery, and environmental and ethical concerns. 1 year Basic Chemistry; 1 year Physics; 1 year Biology recommended.

5072  Thin Film Techniques (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 3210 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to various aspects of thin film processing and characterization. Special focus will be on thin films of electronic materials.

5073  Nanostructured Materials: Science and Technology (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Provide students with a fundamental understanding of various aspects of nanotechnology, and the required skills to apply this knowledge in a wide range of science, engineering and related fields. Lectures will cover Quantum Confinement Effects, Nanofabrication Tech. Atomic Scale Characterization Tech., Nanoelectronic, Nanomagnetics and NanoPhotomics.

5074  Photovoltaic Materials & Solar Cells (3) Cross listed as ECE 5074. Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MSE 3032 AND MSE 3210) AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Course will examine the physics and engineering of photovoltaic devices and the materials used in them. Classroom time will be augmented by labs in which students will fabricate the test simple Si solar cells using the University of Utah Nanofab.

5090  Case Studies in Materials Design (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MSE 3010 AND MSE 3032 AND MSE 3061 AND MSE 3210 AND MSE 3410) AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   This course provides the students with training and background in materials and process selection in design. Students will learn to define technical functions of engineering components, identify material properties that maximize the component performance, screen materials based on property constraints, rank candidate materials using material-performance indices and outline detailed specifications including processing methods, economic batch sizes and cost. Students will learn to write a proposal for research support for a senior design project. Students will also learn and write comprehensive reports on four design projects assigned over the course of the semester.

5098  Senior Design (2) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 5090 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   The Senior Design Project is a capstone experience that focuses on design. This project draws upon previous course work. Students will work on their design projects independently but under the direction of a faculty member in their area of specialization. For graduating seniors only.

5099  Senior Thesis (2) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 5098 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   A continuation of the Senior Design Project, finalizing it with a written design/thesis report. The senior design and senior thesis must be completed and approved before the end of spring semester of the year the student is registered for the course. For graduating seniors only.

5201  Semiconductor Device Physics I (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 3210 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Physical principles that underlie operation of semiconductor electronic devices with emphasis on silicon integrated circuits. Physics of semiconductor materials, equilibrium in electronic systems, metal semiconductor contacts, p-n junction theory, junction field effect transistors, introduction to operation of bipolar transistors.

5202  Semiconductor Device Physics II (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 5201 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Continuation of MSE 5201. Bipolar transistors, silicon-silicon dioxide system, insulated gate field effect transistors (IGFETs). Mathematical models for computer simulation of bipolar and MOS devices. Second order effects associated with very small geometry devices and other devices of current interest.

5240  Principles and Practice of Transmission Electron Microscopy (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in PHYS 2220 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Meets with MSE 6240, MET E 5240/6240. The course will cover the basic principles of electron diffraction in materials and the operation of transmission electron microscope. Hands on experience with preparation of samples of various materials and structures in a TEM will be provided in laboratory sessions to illustrate the principles and practice of various TEM techniques. The course will consist of 2 lecture sessions and 1 laboratory session per week.

5353  Physical Ceramics (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 3310 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This is the first of a two-semester course sequence on advanced ceramics. Physical ceramics will discuss crystal structures, point defects, diffusion and properties of advanced or high-technology ceramics that have been developed specifically to deliver superior mechanical, electrical, electrochemical, magnetic or optical properties. The ceramics that will be discussed will include oxides, carbides, nitrides, their solid solutions, and multiphase composites made of two or more constituents.

5354  Processing of Ceramics (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 5353 AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   This course provides students with a comprehensive background in processing of ceramic powders and fabrication of ceramic components. The course begins with a discussion of ceramic powder characteristics and techniques of powder characterization. The roles of inter-particle forces in the preparation of stable suspensions (DLVO Theory) will also be discussed. Other topics include: Methods of fabrication of green compacts by such techniques as die-pressing, slip-casting, tape-casting, etc.; surfaces, surface energies, role of surface curvatures in mass transport during sintering; densification of powder compacts by sintering; methods of deposition of films and coatings of ceramics by sol-gel processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD); and synthesis of ceramic powders.

5470  Polymer & Organic Materials for Renewable Energy Applications I (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MSE 3410 AND MSE 3032) AND Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering
   Meets with MSE 6470. This course will explore fundamental concepts of electrochemistry, quantum chemistry, thermodynamics and materials processing related to application of soft materials to electrochemical and photonic devices as well as their use in other energy-related applications.

5475  Introduction to Composites (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in MSE 3410 AND (Full Major status in Materials Science & Engineering OR Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering)
   Basic mechanics and materials science of important modern composite materials. Structures and properties of fibers, matrices, and final composites. Introductory mechanics and approaches to elasticity and strength as applied to composites.

6001  Engineering Materials (3)
   Required for all new MSE Graduate Students. MSE 6001 must be taken during the first fall semester new students are enrolled. Introduction to general classes of materials: ceramics, polymers, metals and semiconductors. Materials properties and structure -property relations. Contemporary research topics in different classes of materials.

6011  Adv Matrls Tech: Experiment, Theory & Characterization (3)
   Introduces graduate students to hands on experimentation to modern skills and techniques of materials research and characterization. MSE 6011 spans full semester and is divided into 6 modules with focusing on an essential skill or technique used in materials research and characterization. Each module will be introduced theoretically and then students will gain experience through hands-on labs. Graduate students will prepare oral presentations in style of conference presentations in the 15th week.

6032  Advanced Thermodynamics (3)
   This course will cover the following topics: Thermodynamics of liquids & Solids, free energy composition diagrams, phase equilibria in two component and multi-components systems, solid-state & liquid-state electrochemistry, batteries, fuel cells, role of surfaces, topics in non-equilibrium thermodynamics, phenomena far from equilibrium.

6034  Kinetics of Solid-State Processes (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Rate theory and diffusion applied to nucleation, crystal growth, grain growth, recrystallization, precipitation, sintering, and solid-state reactions; role of kinetics and thermodynamics in development of mirostructures. Designed to teach first year graduate students in materials science and engineering the basic rate and its application to such solid state phenomena as diffusion solidification and transformations in solids involving nucleation and growth, spinodol decomposition, and martensistic transformations. The design of experimental techniques to solve materials-related problems is emphasized. Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments and a final report connected to the additional assignments as instructed. This course is part of the MSE Core Competency for incoming graduate students. This course is required for all incoming graduate students.

6041  High-Strength Materials (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Theoretical strengths of solids; cracks and notches, dislocation-induced failures; strong metals, ceramic, polymers, and composite materials.

6050  Special Topics (1 to 4)

6055  Microsystems Design and Characterization (4) Cross listed as MET E 6055, BIOEN 6423, ECE 6225, ME EN 6055, CH EN 6659. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Meets with ME EN 5055, ECE 5225, MET E 5055, MSE 5055, CH EN 5659. Third in a 3-course series on Microsystems Engineering. This course generalizes microsystems design considerations with practical emphasis on MEMS and IC characterization/physical analysis. Two lectures, one lab per week, plus 1/2 hour lab lecture. Must also register for ME EN 6056 (0-credit lab with fees). Graduate students only. Extra work required.

6071  Intro to NanoBio Technology and NanoBio Materials (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   This course introduces the field of nanobio technology, the types and properties of materials used, their interactions with living systems, their applications in technology, sensing and drug delivery, and environmental and ethical concerns. Students will critically evaluate scientific literature and are required to finish a final or presentation/project.

6072  Thin Film Techniques I (3)
   This course id designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to various aspects of thin film processing and characterization. Special focus will be on thin films of electronic materials. Graduate portion MSE 6072 will require additional assignments.

6073  Nanostructured Materials: Science and Technology (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Provide graduate students with a fundamental understanding of various aspects of nanotechnology, and the required skills to apply this knowledge in a wide range of science, engineering and related fields. Lectures will cover Quantum Confinement Effects, Nanofabrication Tech. Atomic Scale Characterization Tech., Nanoelectronic, Nanomagnetics and NanoPhotomics. Nanostructured BioCompatible Mtrls. Students will be required to finish a final oral/written or a presentation/project.

6074  Photovoltaic Materials & Solar Cells (3) Cross listed as ECE 6074.
   Course will examine the physics and engineering of photovoltaic devices and the materials used in them. Classroom time will be augmented by labs in which students will fabricate and test simple Si solar cells using the University of Utah Nanofab. Graduate portion MSE/ECE 6074 will require additional assignments.

6075  Nanoscale Probing and Imaging (3)
   This course is designed to teach graduate students the basic principles of electronic microscopy and scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy and their application in nanoscale probing and imaging, as well as single molecule detection. It is designed for improving the understanding and interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology .

6240  Principles and Practice of Transmission Electron Microscopy (3)
   Meets wtih MSE 5240, MET E 5240/6240. The course will cover the basic principles of electron diffraction in materials and the operation of transmission electron microscope. Hands on experience with preparation of samples of various materials and structures in a TEM will be provided in laboratory sessions to illustrate the principles and practice of various TEM techniques. The course will consist of 2 lecture sessions and 1 laboratory session per week.

6261  Physical Theory of Semiconductor Devices (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Development of a thorough, working knowledge of the physics of semiconductor materials and devices, including quantum effects. Examination of advanced devices, including light-emitting diodes, solar cells, detectors, and injection lasers.

6264  Advanced Silicon Devices (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Current topics in silicon device physics. Review of MOS device theory, rules for sealing devices to submission dimensions, theoretical limits to sealing. Short channel, device models including two-dimensional numerical modes. Hot carrier effects and other reliability issues. Yield statistics, lifetime prediction.

6265  Advanced Processing of Semiconductors (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Development of a thorough, working knowledge of the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of epitaxy. This material is used to illustrate the advanced epitaxial techniques of organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, chemical beam epitaxy, and molecular beam epitaxy.

6353  Advanced Topics/Physical Ceramics (3)
   This course will explore topics in Advanced Physicla Ceramics intended for graduate students. This class meets with MSE 5353 Physical Ceramics.

6354  Advanced Topics/Processing Ceramics (3)
   Meets with MSE 5354. This course will explore advanced topics in processing of ceramics and is intended for graduate students.

6421  Fundamentals of Micromachining Processes (3) Cross listed as BIOEN 6421, ECE 6221, ME EN 6050.
   Meets with ECE 5221 and ME EN 5050. Introduction to the principles of micromachining technologies. Topics include photolithography, silicon etching, thin film deposition and etching, electroplating, polymer micromachining, and bonding techniques. A weekly lab and a review of micromachining applications is included. Graduate students only. Extra work required.

6470  Polymer & Organic Materials for Renewable Energy Applications I (3)
   Meets with MSE 5470. This course will explore fundamental concepts of electrochemistry, quantum chemistry, thermodynamics and materials processing related to application of soft materials to electrochemical and photonic devices as well as their use in other energy-related applications. Graduate portion of MSE 6470 will require additional assignments and projects.

6480  Polymer Science (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   An overview of polymer science. Topics include polymerization chemistry, molecular weight distributions and measurement, step polymerization, chain polymerization, copolymers, polymer structure and behavior, polymer conformations and stereochemistry, rubber elasticity, and polymer solution.

6481  Polymer Structure, Properties, and Engineering Behavior (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Covers structure and properties of amorphous polymers, the glass-transition process, structure and properties of semicrystalline polymers, and polymer crystallization theories. Engineering behavior topics covered include stress-strain behavior of polymers, yielding, fracture and fatigue, and viscoelastic properties such as creep and stress relaxation .

6590  Special Project - M.S. Non-Thesis (6 to 9)
   Special Project must be in written form and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Students are required to present the results of their project in an oral presentation to the Supervisory Committee. Both the report and presentation are required for degree.

6950  Independent Study (1 to 4)

6970  Thesis Research: Master of Science (1 to 12)

6980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 12)

7031  Computational MSE-Atomic Scale Simulations (3)
   The course is designed to teach graduate students fundamental techniques in atomic-scale simulation and understand and predict materials properties. The system of focus will be solid-state materials, to include metals, semiconductors and ceramics. Students are expected to have hands-on experience with programming and real simulation. The emphasis will be on relating the simulation results and real properties of materials.

7032  Modeling & Simulation of Nanostruct Form on Surface (3)
   This course is to introduce to graduate students the general idea of nanotechnology. To learn the basic concepts and fundamental theories of nanostructure formation on solid surfaces and the fundamental theories of surface elasticity related to modeling and simulation of surface nanostructures.

7041  Materials Kinetics I: Statistical Mechanics (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   General statistical mechanics used in describing materials science systems. Foundation of classical and quantum-statistical mechanics with applications to systems of interest in materials science and engineering.

7042  Materials Kinetics II: Crystal Defects and Diffusion in Solids (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Ionic and electronic defect in oxides, halides, sulfides. Mass transport in ionic conductors, mixed conductors, electrochemical potentials, oxidation of metals, measurement of ionic conductivity, electronic conductivity, electrochemical techniques, electrode process, diffusive transport equivalent circuits. Solid state electrochemistry. Butler-Volmer equation, activication and concentration overpotentials, solid oxide fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, electrochemical sensors, thermally regenerative electrochemical systems.

7050  Special Topics (1 to 4)

7800  Graduate Seminar I (0.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Seminars on advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering.

7801  Graduate Seminar II (0.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Seminars on advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering.

7970  Thesis Research: Ph.D. (1 to 12)

7980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 12)

7990  Continuing Registration: Ph.D. (0)


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