University of Utah
Management
David Eccles School of Business Web Server
MGT Course Descriptions
Home | Feedback | Disclaimer
University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2012
Posted Mar 02, 2012

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2012, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


3000  Principles of Management (3)
   This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the fundamental concepts regarding management in organizations. In general the course addresses the question of how can a person be a good or better manager. The course will be divided into five sections that address the following questions: Management's World, Planning Organizing, Leading, and Controlling. The format of this course will be primarily a discussion format augmented by lectures, preparation assessments, individual and group participation activities, and individual assignments. The course will involve integrating management theory and application using the text and real-life examples from current business and management literature. This course may not be used by management majors to satisfy a departmental elective.

3410  Business Law: The Commercial Environment (3)
   Coverage will include contracts, agency sales, business organizations, commercial paper, secured transactions, business torts, business crimes, and bankruptcy.

3430  International Law (3)
   Emphasis on international legal issues, such as comparative law, resolution of international disputes and technological piracy; the legal implications of run away technology and automation, copyrights and patents, and professional malpractice will be covered.

3600  Managing and Working in Groups and Teams (3)
   In this class, students will learn how to be more effective participants in groups and teams as members or leaders. The class uses a mix of exercises, cases, and lectures to focus attention on common problems in groups and on effective approaches to overcome them. Students will learn how to create effective group collaborations by focusing on challenges and opportunities. The class is open to all majors, and is well suited for students in business, engineering, and those interested in project management, entrepreneurial activity, as well as psychology and sociology.

3680  Human Behavior in Organizations (3) Prerequisites: Intermediate or Full major status in the School of Business
   This course examines behavioral theories and research focused on the individual in the context of groups and organizations as a whole. These theories and research are applied toward understanding the actions, events, and phenomena in organizations, as well as solving problems within organizations. The course content includes such topics as attitudes, personality, emotions, communication, motivation, decision-making, groups and teams, power, conflict and negotiation, leadership, organizational culture, and human resources.

3681  Honors Human Behavior in Organizations (3) Prerequisites: Intermediate or Full major status in the School of Business AND Academic Advisor consent
   This course focuses on the examination of behavioral theories and research and focuses on the individual in the context of groups and organizations as a whole in such areas as leadership, socialization, motivation, communications, leadership, decision-making, conflict resolution, and adaptation to change. Application of these constructs is demonstrated through the consideration of the impact of the individual on the overall performance of the organization across a wide variety of contexts. In addition to the textbook, this course also covers an assortment of research articles to expand on important theories.

3700  Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship (3)
   Meets with MGT 5000. The purpose of this class is to help you learn about entrepreneurship and the various ways in which it shapes your life. We do so by engaging you on three levels. First, we take a high-level conceptual look at entrepreneurship as a phenomenon and learn what it is, why it exists, and how it influences the fabric of everyday life. Second, we take a hands-on approach that is focused on teaching you to think like an entrepreneur. Lastly, since entrepreneurship is a team sport, we help you develop the networking skills you need to assemble your team, and the managerial skills needed to create and launch a business.

3800  Business Ethics (3)
   This course focuses on the following: A) Students will be made aware of the demands that emanate from stakeholders and are placed on business firms. B) As prospective managers, students need to understand appropriate business responses and management approaches for dealing with social, political, environmental, technological, and global issues and stakeholders. C) To have an appreciation for ethical issues and the influence these issues have on management decision-making, behavior, politics, and practices. D) To help students to understand that the entire question of business?s legitimacy as an institution in a global and diverse society is at stake and must be addressed from both a business and societal perspective. E) To assist students to understand that the increasing extent to which social, ethical, public, and global issues must be considered from a strategic perspective is crucial in such courses. F) To enable students to become more knowledgeable and effective contributors to groups and organizations in which they participate. G) To develop insight into the multi-faceted nature of ethical behavior in business, exploring the conflicts that arise from such aspects as self-interest, power, incurred obligations, competition, and fair return, diversity, stating the truth, rights of individuals, and rights of management. H) To develop a consciousness for management?s responsibility in the resolution of key problems facing society, such as ecology, racial discrimination, urban blight, financing education, efficiency in government and international relations. I) To assist students to develop personal guidelines on how to handle ethical conflicts.

3810  Business and Professional Communication (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   This course is an advanced communication course focused on public speaking and writing in a business context. Students will blend communication theory with intensive skill building as a way to improve their ability to manage their careers and communicate successfully in the business world. This course is comprised of three main sections: advanced pubic speaking, managerial writing, and career strategies. Students will master the following: (1) traditional correspondence: memo, letter, and proposal writing; (2) electronic correspondence: emails, blogging, text messaging, and instant messaging; (3) career strategies: resume and cover letter writing; and (4) networking skills including the value proposition and elevator speeches. The class is open to all majors and is well suited to any student who wants to sharpen their communication skills and professionalism in the workplace.

4560  Small Business Management (3)
   How does one go about creating a new small business? What must one do to assure its success? That is the topic of this class. As a result of taking this course, students will be better able to understand the tasks and challenges facing the small business, learn how to identify and evaluate the attractiveness (and risk) of different types of business opportunities, acquire practical knowledge about how to start and manage your own small business and learn how to plan and manage for small business growth & success. This class is specifically designed to meet the needs of the non-business major, as well as those who engage in service projects helping build small business communities around the world.

4600  Career Dynamics (3)
   The world of work is radicaly changing: smaller companies, more decentralized operations, less hierarchical organizations, more technical, more global. These changes greatly impact both career planning from the individual's perspective to career management within organizations. This course explores the concepts and dynamics of a career within the context of the rapidly changing work world.

4860  Managing Organizational Conflict (3)
   Theory and process of managing conflict. Development of analytical and behavioral skills through reading, cases, and two-person group role plays. Representative topics include negotiation, group decision making, inter-organizational disputes and the design of dispute-resolution systems.

4900  International Management (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   This course focuses on exploring and considering the impact of the international context on business and specific management functions which both domestic and internationally operating firms must consider to remain successful. This approach includes examining the macro-international environment from a variety of perspectives, and includes the political, legal, social, cultural, technological and business contexts. In addition to lectures and text materials, current articles in international management are used in each class to directly apply many of the course concepts and to better understand how international management issues are perceived by different stakeholders in a variety of international environments. Given the growing importance of emerging markets and economies for international business, this course also includes attention to issues involving a variety of geographic regions.

4999  Management Honors Thesis/Project (1.5 to 3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

5000  Entrepreneurship (3)
   The purpose of this class is to help you learn about entrepreneurship and the various ways in which it shapes your life. We do so by engaging you on three levels. First, we take a high-level conceptual look at entrepreneurship as a phenomenon and learn what it is, why it exists, and how it influences the fabric of everyday life. Second, we take a hands-on approach that is focused on teaching you to think like an entrepreneur. Lastly, since entrepreneurship is a team sport, we help you develop the networking skills you need to assemble your team, and the managerial skills needed to create and launch a business.

5510  Human Resource Management (3)
   A survey course that examines the functions of human-resource management and their strategic integration through policy formation. Topics include employee involvement, quality of work life, unionization, recruitment, selection, placement, promotion, performance, appraisal, compensation and benefits, work-system design, and job enrichment, training and development, and strategic human resource planning. All management majors will be required to complete MGT 5510.

5590  Managing the Global Workforce (3)
   Meets with MGT 6590. This course focuses on human resource issues facing managers whose activities require them to operate in an international environment in the United States or abroad. This course is intended for students considering careers in multinational organizations and students whose current or future work assignments include responsibilities for employees in other countries. In today's global marketplace, the success of an organization depends on how well it manages individuals and groups in its home country, in host countries where its subsidiaries are located and in third countries where it may hire some of its employees. Managing such a global workforce requires a sound understanding of human resource management issues and practices of multinational corporations such as international recruitment and selection, training and development, performance management, and compensation. In this course we will cover these topics. In addition we will explore the impact of cultural differences on management practices in countries other than the US. The course uses a variety of learning approaches including case analyses, lectures, class discussions, videos, experiential exercises, and a group project.

5700  Strategic Management (3) Prerequisites: "C-" or better in (FINAN 3040 OR FINAN 3041) AND (MGT 3680 OR MGT 3681) AND (MKTG 3010 OR MKTG 3011) AND Full major status in the School of Business
   This course focuses on understanding the key functional, business, and corporate decisions that affect the long-term position of the firm. The central concept of this course is competitive strategy, involving the use of critical resources over long periods of time to attain specific goals and objectives. Students look at both the internal structure of the firm and the external dynamics of the macro and industry environments. Taught primarily through cases and involves substantial class discussion and writing.

5701  Advanced Strategic Management (3)
   This course focuses on understanding the key functional, business, and corporate decisions that affect the long-term position of the firm. The central concept of this course is competitive strategy, involving the use of critical resources over long periods of time to attain specific goals and objectives. Students look at both the internal structure of the firm and the external dynamics of the macro and industry environments. Taught primarily through cases and involves substantial class discussion and writing.

5750  Profiles of Leadership (1 to 3)
   Meets with MGT 6850. Entrepreneurship and leadership go hand in hand. The purpose of this class is to familiarize students with contemporary trends and challenges of leading a growing business in today's economy. This is accomplished through lectures and readings, and frequent presentations by distinguished entrepreneurs and business leaders. This business elective has no prerequisites and is open to all majors (i.e., not just business majors). Admission is by application only. Please send a letter stating your interest in the course and academic background, along with your resume, to the Department of Management. You will be contacted by the Dean's Office of the David Eccles College of Business if selected.

5760  Management of Innovation (3)
   Proctor & Gamble, Honda, Apple, Inc., Boeing, 3M, Target. What do these companies have in common, other than strong financial performance? All of these companies are considered among the best at managing innovation. This course will explore how companies manage organizational and industry-wide factors that facilitate or constrain the ability to innovate and to capture the returns from innovation. These issues apply to all firms, not just those in technologically-intensive industries. The course uses organizational and strategic theory as well as cases in improve students' ability to identify sources of competitive advantage derived from the successful management of innovation.

5770  Business Discovery (3)
   The objective of this course is to lead each student, either individually or as the member of a team, through the practical experience of constructing a business plan. After completing this course, you will have produced a business plan suitable for launching a company. A hands-on, team-based, approach, in which business ideas are proposed, tested, and refined over successive stages, is employed. Business plan presentation strategies and skills are also addressed.

5780  Managing the Growing Business (3)
   This course is about how to build a company from launch through the first several years of organizational life. The challenges and hurdles you will face as an entrepreneur over this period are organizational (need to define and refine your product & its markets, win customers, build a management team, and acquire resources) and personal (need to identify your strengths, acknowledge and develop strategies to overcome limitations, face fears, learn leadership and make hard decisions). We use case studies, frequent guest lectures, and field and team assignments to develop the skills and expertise needed to lead firms through this difficult period of organizational life.

5810  Managing Diversity in Organizations (3) Fulfills Communication/Writing and Diversity.
   In this course, students will learn how to manage diversity as a competitive advantage in business. Students will examine how the complexities of the primary dimensions of diversity, gender, race, national origin, age, religion, sexual orientation, and disabilities, operate within an organizational framework. The class uses a variety of discussions, facilitations, exercises, and cases analyses to help students gain an understanding of what it means to manage diversity on a systemic level. Specific attention is given to enhancing public speaking and writing skills. The class is open to all majors and both undergraduate and graduate students; the course is well suited for students in business, entrepreneurship, communication, human resources, gender studies, sociology, and psychology.

5820  Consulting for Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)
   Meets with MGT 6780: Starting, growing, and managing non-profits leads to challenges that are in some cases more complex than the challenges facing the private sector. Non-profits need to identify their market, confront competitors, and manage their internal operations just as effectively as private firms. However, non-profits must address the needs of multiple constituencies, they must balance their values against the requirements of effective management, and they must attract and retain a skilled labor force without the financial resources that characterize much of the private sector. This course is intended to give students a broad overview of the leadership challenges of the non-profit sector, while providing them with the specific consulting skills they need to assist those leaders as they strive to better meet the needs of the local community.

5830  Leadership, Power, and Supervisory Behavior in Organizations (3) Prerequisites: "C-" or better in (MGT 3680 OR MGT 3681) AND Full major status in the School of Business
   Leadership behaviors and styles and their implications for successful managerial performance. Usefulness of current theories in describing and predicting group and leader performance.

5850  Current Topics in Management (1 to 3)
   Upper-division or graduate status. Topics vary according to current marketing environment and special interests/experience of instructor.

5860  Entrepreneur Studies (1.5 to 3)
   Meets with MGT 6860. This course provides students an unparalleled opportunity to apply knowledge and expertise to the commercial development of University technologies. Lectures and topics include venture capital and new venture finance, market research and due diligence, intellectual property and patent protection, technology transfer issues, as well as guest lectures from prominent business leaders and local entrepreneurs.

5880  Management Internship (3) Prerequisites: "C-" or better in (MGT 3680 OR MGT 3681) AND Full major status in Management
   You can earn credit toward graduation while working in your chosen field. This course is designed in cooperation with Career Services to provide three upper division Management elective credits for appropriate work in supervised internship. It is an opportunity for you to learn management principles in a practical work environment, examine the management process through a graded academic project, and possibly take home a paycheck. (Note: not all internships are paid positions.)

5910  Special Study (1 to 4)
   Independent study of special topics for upper-division students of high scholastic standing.

6050  Laying the Foundations of Teamwork (1.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of working in a group or team. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of problems that are faced in a variety of group settings. Students will learn analytical and behavioral tools to effectively diagnose complex dynamics in work groups and take action to improve group performance. Students will also learn practical interpersonal skills useful for implementing effective strategies in group situations. The course is intended to help students become more effective while working in groups and teams. Considerable emphasis will be placed on simulations, role-playing, and cases.

6051  Managing and Leading in Organizations (1.5 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Emphasizes human behavior concepts and principles useful in creating high performance work places. Personal leadership effectiveness is enhanced through self-assessment, feedback, and studying the practices of exemplary leaders. Methods of managing individuals, groups and organizations to elicit high levels of performance are introduced through discussion of topics such as motivation, power and influence, group behavior and teams, decision making, conflict and collaboration, organization design, culture and leading change. Cases, group discussion and team exercises are used extensively in the course.

6052  Business Communication (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   This course provides students with an opportunity to improve both their spoken communication and writing skills in a business context. The main focus of this course is mastering persuasive, ethical speaking and writing to a global business audience. Students will practice their oral communication skills in a variety of settings from informal coaching sessions to large, formal presentations. Written assignments include both traditional correspondence such as memos, letters, and proposals; as well as electronic correspondence such as email, blogging, text messaging, and instant messaging. As a way to improve their communication skills, students will engage in meaningful self analyses by examining verbal and written feedback from peers and instructors, viewing and assessing multiple videotaped presentations, and participating in writing workshops and the revision process.

6053  Advanced Writing for Business (1.5) Prerequisite: Masters status in the School of Business.
   The main focus of this course is on written expression in the business context. In particular, we concentrate on how the written word acts as a principal means of implementing business strategy and solving managerial problems. Students will enhance their proficiency as writers, regardless of current skill level, and will improve their writing through a series of workshops and revisions. Students will gain a clear understanding of the communication process, audience analysis, and message development. Further, students will learn how to integrate ethical dimensions of business writing when writing to both domestic and global business audiences. Assignments include traditional correspondence such as memos, letters, proposals, and case analyses; and electronic correspondence such as email, blogging, instant messaging, and text messaging.

6054  Advanced Public Speaking for Business (1.5) Prerequisite: Masters status in the School of Business.
   This course provides students with an opportunity to improve their spoken communication skills in a variety of settings from informal meetings to large, formal presentations. Students will learn how to craft a speech by integrating Aristotle?s three means of persuasion?ethos (ethical appeal, credibility), pathos (emotional appeal), and logos (logical appeal)?as a framework for their message. In addition, students will learn how to deliver a speech using a conversational, kinesthetic, authentic style of speaking. Students will receive extensive peer and instructor feedback on every aspect of oral communication including delivery, non-verbal behavior, content, organization, and visual support. Students will complete multiple self assessments after close examination of their videotaped presentations.

6070  Competitive Strategy (1.5 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the PMBA Program.
   Competitive Strategy adopts the perspective of the chief executive and challenges the student to evaluate the competitive environment, evaluate the firm?s core skills and capabilities, and to craft a strategy that will allow the firm to leverage its competitive advantages over time. The course begins with an introduction to the core concepts and tools of competitive analysis, and then illustrates the application of these tools to the host of questions the chief executive must answer in order to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. The first part of the course focuses on business-level strategy, which explores how to create and sustain competitive advantage in undiversified firms. Topics addressed in this portion of the class include industry dynamics, identification of competitively valuable skills, resources, and capabilities, technology strategy, and trade-offs among various business level strategies. The second part of the course focuses on Corporate Strategy, which is concerned with the complex and challenging task of managing the diversified (multi-product) firm. Topics addressed include vertical integration, diversification, and globalization strategies.

6071  Competitive Strategy (1.5 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Standing in MBA Program.
   Competitive Strategy adopts the perspective of the chief executive and challenges the student to evaluate the competitive environment, evaluate the firm?s core skills and capabilities, and to craft a strategy that will allow the firm to leverage its competitive advantages over time. The course begins with an introduction to the core concepts and tools of competitive analysis, and then illustrates the application of these tools to the host of questions the chief executive must answer in order to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. The first part of the course focuses on business-level strategy, which explores how to create and sustain competitive advantage in undiversified firms. Topics addressed in this portion of the class include industry dynamics, identification of competitively valuable skills, resources, and capabilities, technology strategy, and trade-offs among various business level strategies. The second part of the course focuses on Corporate Strategy, which is concerned with the complex and challenging task of managing the diversified (multi-product) firm. Topics addressed include vertical integration, diversification, and globalization strategies.

6130  Law and the Corporate Manager (1.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Studies the legal environment in which business organizations operate. Topics include the rights of shareholders; director's and officer's liability; mergers, acquisitions, and takeovers; and securities regulation. Both federal and state law will be considered.

6150  Leadership & Management in High Performance Organizations (2.8) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Emphasizes human behavior concepts and principles useful in creating high performance work places. Personal leadership effectiveness is enhanced through self-assessment, feedback, and studying the practices of exemplary leaders. Methods of managing individuals, groups and organizations to elicit high levels of performance are introduced through discussion of topics such as motivation, power and influence, group behavior and teams, decision making, conflict and collaboration, organization design, culture and leading change. Cases, group discussion and team exercises are used extensively in the course.

6151  Team Effectiveness (1.4) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation in a variety of managerial contexts. The course is designed to be relevant to the various kinds of negotiation problems that are faced by managers. The course complements the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses. A basic premise of the course is that while a manager needs analytic skills to discover optimal solutions to problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed for these solutions to be accepted by others and implemented in collaboration with them. The course will allow participants the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks.

6153  Negotiations and Conflict Management (1.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation in a variety of managerial contexts. The course is designed to be relevant to the various kinds of negotiation problems that are faced by managers. The course complements the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses. A basic premise of the course is that while a manager needs analytic skills to discover optimal solutions to problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed for these solutions to be accepted by others and implemented in collaboration with them. The course will allow participants the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks.

6154  Competitive Advantage Through Human Resources (1.5) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   This course focuses on organizing and managing people to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. The people-centered management strategies used by high performance firms will be examined, emphasizing both research and leading-edge practice. The following topics will be explored; attracting, developing, motivating and retaining talent to support strategic objectives; designing high performance organizations; knowledge management; recruitment and selection processes; building a flexible and capable workforce; designing reward systems; managing work/life balance; measuring and communicating performance; understanding the legal environment; and leading an organizational transformation.

6155  Communication and Interpersonal Effectiveness (1.4) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Focuses on communication and interpersonal skills needed for success in leadership, team and high performance settings. Skills include communicating clearly, directly and supportively; listening; interpersonal problem solving; conducting interviews; facilitating group discussions and meetings; giving formal presentations, and using presentation software. The course includes skill practice, peer feedback, self-analysis, role playing, videotaping and conducting formal presentations.

6156  Advanced Leadership: Problem Solving in Business Organizations (2.8) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   An important part of leadership and management consists of defining and attempting to solve many types of problems. This course brings together all the insights and skills that focus upon real and complicated problems. It addresses specifically two classes of problems, referred to as convergent ('Tame') and divergent ('Wicked'). Different methods for approaching these types of problems are discussed. These two quantitative techniques available for solving convergent problems will be considered, as will alternative approaches for addressing divergent problems. Class participants will enhance both analytical and creative thinking abilities to more effectively identify problems and potential solutions, allowing them to develop a whole new way of thinking about problems.

6170  Strategy (2.8 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Strategy introduces the basic concepts and tolls for formulating business strategy and focuses on how firms can develop sustainable competitive advantages. Central topics include assessing industry economics and dynamics to identify strategic threats and opportunities, evaluating the profit potential of strategic resources and capabilities, and strategic diversification. Other topics include assessing actual and potential cost and differentiation advantages, vertical scope of the firm, strategic management of multi-business firms, global strategy, strategic alliances, competitive advantage and the Internet, strategic management in technology-intensive industries, and strategy under uncertainty.

6171  Managing in the Global Economy (1.4 to 2.8) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Focuses on the modern global environment of business and the strategic and organizational responses of firms to this environment. The first section of the course, Dynamics of the Global Environment, will cover topics such as the global capital system, international political institutions, cultural differences in a global world, and technology and the global system. The second part of the course, Managing the Global Enterprise, will move to firm-level issues to include international and global strategy, organizing the global enterprise, and networks and alliances in global industry. The final section of the course, From Global to Local, brings environmental and corporate concerns into focus in the foreign market. It will cover such topics as market entry strategies, the impact of globalization on national cultures, the roles of multinational firms from emerging markets, and in general the clash of the industrialized world and the developing world.

6180  Entrepreneurial Management (1.4) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing/Masters Status in the School of Business
   Entrepreneurship is becoming increasingly important as existing firms face increasing pressure to develop new products in complex, rapidly changing, technology-intensive markets. In this class, we explore how the entrepreneurial manager creates teams to foster innovation, create products, pioneer new markets, and experiment with new technologies. We also explore the challenges of fostering and sustaining an entrepreneurial orientation within the organization. The benefits of important organizational strategies, including joint ventures, alliances, spin-outs/carve-offs and corporate venturing also addressed.

6253  Negotiations and Conflict Management II (1.4)
   The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation in a variety of managerial contexts focusing specifically on multiparty negotiations. The course is designed to be relevant to the various kinds of negotiation problems that are faced by manger. The course complements the technical and diagnostic skills learned the in the courses. A basic premise of the course is that while a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed for these solutions to be accepted by others and implemented in collaboration with them. The course will allow participants the opportunity to develop these skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytical frameworks.

6310  Business Law (1.5 to 3)
   Basic principles of business law for graduate students.

6500  Managerial Negotiation (1.5 to 3)
   Processes and techniques of bargaining and negotiating in organizational settings. Students develop negotiation skills through extensive case analyses, role-playing, and simulations. Negotiation interpreted broadly to include bargaining between individuals, bosses and subordinates, departments and groups, and large collectivities such as labor and management. There is a fee for this class to cover the copyright costs of the negotiation exercises.

6510  Problem Solving (1.5 to 3)
   An important part of leadership and management consists of defining and attempting to solve many types of problems. This course addresses two classes of problems, referred to as convergent ('Tame') and divergent ('Wicked'). Different methods for approaching these types of problems are discussed. Specifically, two quantitative techniques available for solving convergent problems will be considered, as will alternative approaches for addressing divergent problems. Class participants will enhance both analytical and creative thinking abilities to more effectively identify problems and potential solutions, allowing them to develop a whole new way of thinking about problems.

6520  Enhancing Creativity in Business Organizations (1.5 to 3)
   Creative ideas and solutions to important problems are urgently needed in business organizations. Yet many organizations pay little attention to the development and support of creative talent. This course will focus on: (1) the development of creative talent: creative thinking, creative problem solving; (2) the importance of organizational climate in supporting and encouraging creativity; (3) exploration of the relationship between creative thinking and product/process innovations and improvements in business organizations.

6530  Competitive Advantage Through People (1.5 to 3)
   This course focuses on organizing and manageing people to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. The people-centered management strategies used by high performance firms will be examined, emphasizing both research and leading-edge practice. The following topics will be explored: attracting, developing, motivating and retaining talent to support strategic objectives; designing high performance organizations; knowledge management; recruitment and selection processes; building a flexible and capable workforce; designing reward systems; managing work/life balance; measuring and communicating performance; understanding the legal environment; and leading an organizational transformation.

6540  Business Ethics (1.5 to 3) Prerequisites: MBA 6600
   The purpose of this course is to help students understand the ethical problems that confront managers and to approach their role as leaders with a sense of purpose and vision. The course explores students' own ethical orientations, the values of practicing managers, and alternative approaches to ethical problems. Representative topics include making choices about influencing and obeying the law, profits versus other values, the relationship between the interests of individuals and groups, how corporate policies affect the ethical choices of individuals, and criteria for making ethical decisions. The course follows a practical and effective model for analyzing ethical dilemmas in the work place in order to reach optimal decisions.

6545  Leading Responsibly (3)
   In part, "leading responsibly" is about encouraging, guiding, and organizing others to avoid morally questionable acts and to seek out ways of doing good. It is about formulating and implementing policies, practices, and procedures to promote these ends and about motivating others to adhere to them. In today's highly competitive, global business organizations, these are remarkably difficult tasks. The course is intended to aid students to appreciate the demands of leading responsibly and to expose them to ways, as managers, they may meet those challenges. Thus, the course will examine, for example, possible conflicts between economic self-interests and obligations to the business's stakeholders, between the desire to do the right thing and organizational pressures to do wrong, and between wanting to manage for the good of society and not having the knowledge to do so. Students will read, discuss, and write about the topics covered, hopefully always evidencing a concern for how they personally will lead. Readings will be drawn from a variety of literatures including psychology, law, philosophy, theology, finance, management, and sociology. The course differs from and complements Management of Ethics (MGT 6540) both in terms of focus and pedagogy. It focuses on creating or organic climate for ethics rather than the analytic alternatives individuals use in attempting to resolve ethical dilemmas. To accomplish its goal, the course occasionally employs traditional cases; but, it emphasizes readings and discussions.

6550  Organizations, Environments, and Structure (1.5 to 3)
   Focuses on the design of organizations and how such factors as the environment, technology, jobs, and people affect successful design of such structures. Concepts of congruence and contingency are used to illustrate how executives can redesign organizations effectively.

6560  Organizational Change and Development (1.5 to 3)
   Theories of planned organizational change to increase organizational effectiveness and individual satisfaction and motivation. Theory of organizational change, organizational diagnosis, consulting skills, organizational intervention, including survey feedback, training, laboratory experiences, and evaluation.

6570  Power and Politics Within Organizations (1.5 to 3)
   Organizations are fundamentally political entities and in them, power and influence are key mechanisms by which things get done. Moreover, effective leadership involves developing and wielding influence among others. In this course, such processes will be diagnosed and analyzed focusing on the sources, dynamics, and effects of power and political struggles in organizations. Course objectives include: developing the ability to create and use sources of power beyond formal authority, identifying common strategies and tactics of influence, and exercising skills that make each student more effective in complex, changing organizations. Course materials and activities focus on topics such as: the management of strategic dependencies and social/political capital; ethics; culture and unobtrusive control; commitment; and persuasion processes; and network building.

6580  Managing Groups and Teams, Advanced Topics (3) Prerequisites: MGT 6050
   This MBA elective will further students' understanding of the benefits and challenges of using groups and teams to perform work in organizations. The class builds on the Team Foundations (MGT 6050) core class. This class will involve both substantial experiential and theoretical components. The class will cover topics including conflict management and resolution, information management, interpersonal communication, performance feedback, and the role of technology in groups. From a practical standpoint, the course will address common problems faced by groups, such as confronting non-performing individuals, designing reward structures for groups, overcoming weak leadership, managing differential commitment by members, and the effective use of technology to enhance member coordination and group work.

6590  Managing the Global Workforce (1.5 to 3)
   This course focuses on human resource issues facing managers whose activities require them to operate in an international environment in the United States or abroad. This course is intended for students considering careers in multinational organizations and students whose current or future work assignments include responsibilities for employees in other countries. In today's global marketplace, the success of an organization depends on how well it manages individuals and groups in its home country, in host countries where its subsidiaries are located and in third countries where it may hire some of its employees. Managing such a global workforce requires a sound understanding of human resource management issues and practices of multinational corporations such as international recruitment and selection, training and development, performance management, and compensation. In this course we will cover these topics. In addition we will explore the impact of cultural differences on management practices in countries other than the US. The course uses a variety of learning approaches including case analyses, lectures, class discussions, videos, experiential exercises, and a group project.

6710  Strategy & Technology (1.5 to 3)
   The purpose of this course is to investigate how technologies emerge and evolve, and to explore how those processes influence, and are influenced by, competition. Topics addressed include the creation and evolution of technology, the emergence of industry standards, the economics of technology networks, the emergence of markets, technology platforms, intellectual property, product commercialization, and the management of technology portfolios. Class readings and materials about new and emerging technologies are drawn from the web and other sources. Industry experts are also frequent participants.

6720  Applications of Business Strategy (1.5 to 3)
   Emphasizes the environment in which strategic decision-making takes place. It provides an opportunity to apply the analytic tools learned in MGT 6070/6071 in a variety of contexts. Topics vary by year, but have included advanced coursework regarding the critical role of leadership, strategy in dynamic environments, as well as, technologically intensive environments. The course is taught primarily through the use of topical strategy cases. Students can expect written case analyses, group projects, and a major written project.

6730  Mergers, Acquisition, and Alliance Strategies (3)
   Cooperative strategies have become a prominent feature of the modern competitive landscape. This course focuses on the strategic use of alliances and joint ventures, in which two or more firms join forces for competitive advantage. It also explores the use of acquisitions and the strategic impact of industry consolidation. The course is intended to increase the effectiveness of students at analyzing issues related to strategy, organization, and technology as they apply to these actions. The advantages and disadvantages of alliances are developed in detail. The organizational challenges of successful and unsuccessful acquisitions also are examined. In particular, the strategic choice of alliance, a joint venture, or acquisition as a way to increase the knowledge and capabilities of a firm is developed.

6740  Strategic Leadership (3) Prerequisites: Masters Status in the School of Business
   This course examines fundamental issues in leading an organization to achieve its purposes and objectives. Students will learn how to set direction in an organization through vision and values and build excitement for organizational purposes. Students assess their strengths and weaknesses in performing important strategic roles. Particular emphasis is given to implementing strategic change and to leading innovation and creativity to enhance corporate growth. The overall purpose of the course is to help students explore how to increase their personal impact on organizational results.

6750  Business Turnarounds (1.5 to 3)
   This course will examine ways to improve the performance of under-performing firms. Primary attention will be given to the role of strategic change or re-orientation in the turnaround process. Students will examine the role of managers in leading turnarounds. Students will also be introduced to analytical frameworks that examine how organizational levers such as structure, incentives, and measurement facilitate turnarounds.

6780  Social Venturing: Consulting to Not-for-Profit Organizations (3)
   Non-profits are complex businesses, built on a foundation of ethical action grounded in the public trust. Starting, growing, and leading non-profits creates challenges that are in some cases more complex than those facing the private sector. "Social entrepreneurs" are individuals leading non-for-profit organizations who develop innovative solutions to long standing issues, are strategic, and manage their internal operations effectively. Non-profits are confronted not only with fundamental business decisions, but also with ethical issues inherent in their role in our society: addressing the needs of multiple constituencies, balancing values against the requirements of effective management, and creating the greatest common good with limited resources. This course gives students a broad overview of the ethical and overall business leadership challenges of the non-profit sector, while providing non-profit organizations with the specific consulting skills they need as they strive to better meet the needs of the community.

6790  International Management (1.5 to 3)
   This course is designed to prepare students to be managers in an international setting. It does this by exposing students to a wide variety of issues related to exporting, importing, and foreign investment. The class will be divided into 6 units which will address international business and its cultural foundations, management of the systems governing international trade and U.S. trade policy, intellectual property rights considerations, performing broad ?due diligence?, managing risk in an international setting, and the specific strategic tactics of doing business internationally.

6791  Global Strategic Management (1.5 to 3)
   The core focus of the class is the management of global corporate strategy in today?s complex worldwide business environment. The course is designed to give the student an understanding of the choices which managers face in order to remain competitive in highly uncertain and rapidly changing international environments. This perspective will help develop skills in global industry analysis and resource evaluation, evaluation of alternative competitive strategies, and knowledge of alternative organizational forms for multinational firms. The course will also examine the use and design of different forms of partnerships, different forms of foreign market entry, and discuss how to operate in a multi-cultural external environment. Given the growing importance of emerging markets and economies for international business, this course also include attention to issues and firms from a wide variety of geographic regions.

6792  Applied International Management & Regional Contexts (3) Prerequisite: Professional MBA student status.
   The purpose of the Applied International Management elective course to expand and enhance PMBA students' practical knowledge and understanding of international business environments, to extend their appreciation of cross-country differences through direct interaction, and to expose them to current foreign business practices and regulations.

6810  Venture Foundations (1.5 to 3)
   The purpose of this five-week course is to teach you the foundation skills you will need to create a valuable business idea. We accomplish this task by engaging you on three levels. First, we present a high-level overview of the entrepreneurial system: What it is, how it works, and how, when and where you can plug in to it. Second, we take a hands-on approach and, using ideas from you and your classmates, start you on the road to learning how to think like an entrepreneur. Lastly, since entrepreneurship is a team sport, the classroom is the arena in which you will learn networking skills, and assemble teams whose players have the skills you need to create and launch a business.

6820  Venture Trends (1.5 to 3) Prerequisites: MGT 6810 AND FINAN 6300
   This course is a five-week overview of technology and emerging opportunities in selected industry and technological sectors. The specific content of the course will vary from term to term in order to address the broad array of topics that are of interest to students in the David Eccles School of Business and the University community as a whole. This course is supervised by the Management Department but taught by faculty who will be recruited from science and industry for their specific expertise. No scientific background is required.

6830  Applied Venture Skills (1.5 to 3) Prerequisite: MGT 6810.
   The task of conceiving and launching a new venture requires specific knowledge about your product, your industry, and competitive environment. Each industry has also evolved a set of idiosyncratic skills and blocks of knowledge that are required for success. The purpose of this class is to provide you with those skills. This class is taught in collaboration with business professionals who have deep experience in the industries studied in MGT 6820: Venture Trends.

6840  Venture Planning (1.5 to 3) Cross listed as FINAN 6881. Prerequisite: MGT 6810.
   Most "business planning" courses teach the student how to prepare a document that can be used to help obtain funding for their proposed venture. The implicit assumption is that the business plan is itself valuable. In contrast, this class is based on the assumption that the crucial task is to define and validate your business concept. The course will provide you with the skills needed to perform that task. You will then prepare an opportunity assessment, a presentation, and the needed documentation. Class will conclude with a formal presentation of your assessment to a panel of experts.

6850  Current Topics in Management (1 to 3)
   Upper division or graduate status. Topics vary according to current marketing environment and special interests/experience of instructor.

6860  Lassonde Venture (1.5 to 3)
   Meets with MGT 5860. This course provides students an unparalleled opportunity to apply knowledge and expertise to the commercial development of University technologies. Lectures and topics include venture capital and new venture finance, market research and due diligence, intellectual property and patent protection, technology transfer issues, as well as guest lectures from prominent business leaders and local entrepreneurs.

6890  Entrepreneurship Field Studies (1.5 to 6)
   Established for student internships at the Masters level. Students are assigned to work on projects with local businesses, for which the students earns 1.5 to 6.0 credit hours. The interns fill various needs for the participating companies such as creating business plans, market research, evaluating merger/acquisition candidates, new projects development, etc. Approvals to enroll are granted on a case-by-case basis by the MBA office. To register email Master Program Advisor at laurie.bragg@utah.edu.

6910  Special Study for Master's Students (0.5 to 6)

6970  Thesis Research (1 to 6)

6980  Faculty Consultation (3)

7100  Research Design: Validity & Methodological Issues (1 to 4)
   This course examines key stages in the process of applied social science research, focusing on theory development and research design. We begin by learning to frame research questions, propositions, hypothesis, and constructs/variables and assess research validity concerns. In parallel, we consider the merits of alternative research methods for developing theory, collecting data, and testing hypotheses, including survey design, case studies, and archival research. We will explore the strengths of different methods for different research goals and will consider approaches to combining insights from different research methods. For each topic, students study core readings and relevant examples of research papers. The course will have an underlying "methodological" focus, where perennial issues across disciplines (e.g., around levels and units of analysis and the commensurability of different theoretical paradigms) will be discussed in the context of concrete research problems.

7200  Cross-Discipline Seminar (1 to 4) Prerequisites: PhD Standing
   This course provides students the opportunity to build on their knowledge and research experience and consider knowledge creation and communication, as well as it limitations. The primary goal for this course is for students to question seriously and rigorously why social science claims to know what it knows from various disciplines and methods. The secondary goal for this course is for students to understand some of the important commonalities and differences among the disciplines and approaches that form the basis for research and teaching in professional schools. Finally, this course will help students understand the purposes and assumptions of professional education and thus improve students? teaching.

7300  Effective Teaching Practices and Theories (2)
   Open only to Ph.D. Students. In this course, students will blend pedagogical theory and practice in the context of the business curriculum. Through an examination of case studies, journal articles, and diverse teaching approaches, the course provides an introduction to pedagogical learning. Students will learn how to: craft a personal teaching philosophy, develop and execute lectures and discussions, implement class policies, handle interpersonal interactions, manage issues of classroom diversity, and develop effective teaching tools. In addition, students will design a syllabus, prepare and deliver microteaching assignments, evaluate their teaching style via videotaped teaching assignments, and begin to develop a teaching portfolio.

7310  Writing for Publication (1 to 3)
   The goal of this course is for students to learn how to transform a seminar paper into a scholarly publication. At the end of the course, students will either submit their essay to an academic journal or present their essay at a national conference. During this intense six-week course, students will: 1) understand the nature of writing problems/blocking; 2) analyze key features of academic journals; 3) examine the key elements of scholarly essays (introduction, conclusion/discussion, theory, and method; 4) engage in roundtable discussions with guest speakers and writing experts; 5) learn how to resent their work effectively at academic conferences; and 6) actively work on their writing projects.

7600  Seminar: Strategic Management Theory (1 to 4)
   Foundational theory and research in strategic management which explores a variety of the major competing schools of thought in the field.

7610  Seminar: Strategic Management Research II (1 to 4)
   Advanced topics in strategic management theory and research.

7620  Seminar: Special Topics in Strategic Management (1 to 4)
   Selected Topics of interest in strategic management. Topics vary by the semester and year, but have included Global Strategy, Entrepreneurship, Technology and Innovation, Institutional Economics, etc.

7800  Seminar: Research Foundations of Organizational Behavior (1 to 4)
   A principal intent of the course is to assist students in discovering and appreciating the literature on organizational behavior. Topics range from organizational commitment to work motivation, from emotions at work to leadership, and from negotiations to ethics. Students will have the opportunity to pick a topic to explore in depth.

7810  Seminar: Topics in Organizational Behavior (1 to 6) Prerequisites: PhD Standing
   Selected topics of interest in Orgaqnizational Behavior.

7820  Seminar: Organizational Theory (1 to 4)
   Current macro theories and research in organizational theory, with emphasis on organizational structure and effectiveness.

7830  Ethics of Management (1 to 4)
   The purpose of this course is to help students understand the ethical problems that confront managers and to approach their role as managers with a sense of purpose and vision. The course explores students' own ethical orientations, the values of practicing managers, and alternative approaches to ethical problems. Representative topics include making choices about influencing and obeying the law, profits versus other values, the relationship between the interests of individuals and groups, how corporate policies affect the ethical choices of individuals, and criteria for making ethical judgments.

7910  Special Study: Ph.D. (0.5 to 9)

7920  Directed Summer Ph.D. Research (1 to 6) Prerequisites: PhD Standing
   Directed summer PhD research leading to meeting the requirements of PhD Candidacy; specific goals as prescribed by the student's stage in the PhD Program.

7970  Thesis Research: Ph.D. (1 to 9)

7980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 9)

7990  Continuing Registration: Ph.D. (0)


Home | Feedback | Disclaimer
This page was updated on Mar 02, 2012

U of U Class Schedules| Student Affairs Home Page| U of U Home Page

This web program is provided by Administrative Computing Services.
Please send comments or questions to webmaster@acs.utah.edu.

)