University of Utah
Family and Consumer Studies
FCS Course Descriptions
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University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2012
Posted Mar 02, 2012

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2012, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1400  Introduction to Consumer Policy (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Introduction to public-policy issues raised by consumer problems of health, safety, information, competition, redress, and privacy. Analysis draws on disciplines of economics, political science, history, and law.

1500  Human Development in Context Across the Lifespan (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   A survey examining development through the prenatal period and all stages of life. Consideration of physical, intellectural, and social development, with emphasis upon the influence of various contexts (e.g. family, culture, community, school).

2400  Family Relations Across the Life Course (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Provides an overview to family studies, including theory and research on family demography, union formation, marriage, parenting, post-parental families, non-traditional families, and family problems.

2570  Middle Childhood (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   This course will focus on the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and linguistic development characteristics of children and young adolescents (ages 5-13). Students will relate the major concepts, theories, and research associated with development of children and young adolescents.

2610  Understanding Children (3) Prerequisite: "C-" or better in FCS 1500 OR FCS 3215.
   Ecological approach to the examination of research theory and policy related to young children. Development of young children in the family, school, and broader cultural environments.

2620  Child Development Practicum (3) Prerequisite: "C-" or better in FCS 2610.
   Under faculty supervision, students plan and implement learning experiences for young children. Ecological contexts of development, behavior, and learning in young children.

2621  Whole Child (3)
   This course focuses on child development and childcare during the early years.

2640  Integrated Curriculum Methods (3)
   This class is a curriculum and planning class. Special emphasis will be on the aesthetic domains of visual arts, music, dramatic play, movement and other creative outlets. This methods class will integrate basic skill development (literacy, math, science, etc.) with these creative learning strategies.

3010  Introduction to FCS and Career Development (2)
   The goals of this course are to introduce students to: 1) department faculty 2) careers available to them and 3) to recruit and retain students through increased integration of departmental resources available.

3180  Home, School, and Community Relations (3)
   Family/home learning environment, school environments and Family/School/Community partnerships as they impact student academic achievement.

3200  Research Methods in Family and Consumer Studies (4)
   Basic research designs, measurement techniques, and methods of data collection used in social and behavioral science research, with special attention to fields relevant to FCS. Students analyze research reports and journal articles.

3210  Statistics in Family and Consumer Studies (4) Fulfills Quan Reason (Stat/Logic) & Quant Intensive BS.
   How to present and analyze data relevant to Family and Consumer Studies. Topics include means, standard deviations, T-tests, chi-square, ANOVA, regression analysis, correlations, and computer assignments.

3215  Development in Infancy and Childhood (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   In-depth examination of development through the prenatal period, infancy, and childhood. Consideration of physical, intellectual, and social development, with emphasis upon the child in various contexts (e.g. family, culture, school, community).

3240  Family Belief Systems (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   People with different values and belief systems about families view similar policies, laws, problems, and issues regarding families in very different ways. Course examines and critiques issues surrounding contemporary families from conservative, liberal, and feminist perspectives prevalent in our society and the social, political, ethical, and religious systems in which they are embedded.

3245  Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity (3) Cross listed as PSY 3245. Fulfills Diversity.
   The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the academic and scientific study of human sexuality, with a heavy emphasis on diversity in human sexuality. Human sexuality is examined from multiple perspectives, ranging from the biological through psychological, as well as cultural, medical, ethical and legal issues. The course is intended to provide an in-depth, advanced-level understanding of the foundations and diversity of human sexuality.

3260  Fatherhood (3)
   Social, cultural, historical, and psychological study of fatherhood over the life span and corresponding perspectives regarding masculinity and manhood. Analysis of the role of fathers in the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development of children. Examination of the various and controversial roles and images of fathers as nurturers, co-parents, providers, protectors, patriarchs and "dead-beat dads" in our culture and the media. Exploration of processes for establishing, maintaining, and strengthening relationships between fathers and their children.

3270  Parent-Child Relationships (3)
   Multidisciplinary perspectives on parent-child relationships over the family life cycle.

3290  Ethnic Minority Families (4) Cross listed as ETHNC 3290. Fulfills Diversity & Humanities Exploration.
   An analysis of Latino/a, African American, Asian American and American Indian families to explore their differences from mainstream families. In addition to their respective cultures and heritage, the problems they face and the solutions implemented through social policies will also be explored.

3370  Parenting Across Cultures (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   This course considers parenting practices across diverse cultures around the world and within the United States. The interdisciplinary approach examines how evolution and geographic, political, religious, cultural , and economic characteristics of the community affect specific childrearing approaches and practices. The course also addresses whether there are universal patterns of parenting, or near-universal patterns, and examines which practices are indisputably variable. In trying to understand parenting practices, we will also examine parenting practices in our own community through a service learning project. The project will involve working with one of a number of agencies. These agencies include United for Kids, a family resource program which empowers parents in the NW quadrant of SLC, International Rescue Committee, And Early Literacy First. (Service Learning)

3420  Housing Policy and Issues (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   This course examines national and local programs that enhance affordability; economic and demographic trends that predict the future of housing; social and psychological aspects of housing that promote well-being, and design ideas that make housing and neighborhoods safe, attractive, healthy and convenient. Both web-based and on-site explorations enrich the understanding of housing challenges. The course is relevant to renters and home owners, planners and advocates, government officials, and residential designers, builders, and financiers.

3430  Introduction to Family Policy (3)
   Provides an introduction to national and international family policy, the legislative process, and policy evaluation. It addresses the role of social science research in assessing the effectiveness of policies related to housing, welfare, income support, domestic violence, adoption, reproduction, divorce, as well as other family issues.

3450  Family Economic Issues Across the Life Course (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3210 or MATH 1040. Fulfills Quant Intensive & Soc/Beh Science Exploration.
   Introduction of the economic approach to family-decision making across the life course. Topics include consumption, saving, time allocation, human capital investment, housing, marriage, divorce, fertility, and retirement.

3470  International Consumer Policy (3) Fulfills Int'l Req & Social Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Examination of consumer problems and policies in a variety of more and less developed countries. Attention to ways in which U.S. consumer policy has influenced and is influenced by other nations.

3500  Consumer and Family Finance (3)
   This course serves as an introduction to personal financial planning-the process by which individuals and households determine, pursue, and achieve long-term financial goals. The principal mechanisms of personal financial planning include: investing and asset allocation, risk management, tax planning, retirement planning, and real estate planning. The course is oriented both to students who want to prepare and implement their own financial plans as well as students who wish to assist others in their financial planning. Major course concepts include: the financial planning process, client interactions, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, education planning, overview of risk management investment planning and retirement planning, special circumstances, plan integration, ethics, and business aspects of financial planning.

3600  Introduction to Consumer and Community Policy (3) Cross listed as ENVST 3600. Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Study of national and local public policies that affect consumer well-being and shape communities. Examples of topic areas covered are transportation, urban/suburban growth, housing, credit markets, energy use, retail marketing, and privacy.

3620  Environment and Behavior (3) Cross listed as PSY 3620, ENVST 3620.
   Effects of built and natural environments on human behavior; how people use and affect the physical environment.

3630  Strengthening Families (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Building and preserving strong, resilient families through respecful and supportive relationships, interactions, communication, listening, and problem-solving. Emphasis on individual and family well-being and an awareness of the strengths of family systems as well as the challenges facing families in contemporary society. Related study of meaning and importance of family processes through which personal and family meaning is made and shared.

3904  Modes of Learning: Service Learning (1)
   When attached to a concurrent class, this course will provide enriched learning of the concurrent course content via service-learning experiences.

3905  Modes of Learning: Writing & Communication in FCS (1)
   When attached to a concurrent class, this course will provide enriched learning of the concurrent course content via intensive writing and/or oral communication exercises.

3962  Special Topics (3)
   Specific content varies.

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

5110  Graduate Multivariate Statistics (4) Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Covers a range of topics on regression analysis. Topics include multiple regression, conducting regression diagnostics, multi-collinearity, interaction effects, repeated measures, and logistic regression. Meets with FCS 6110.

5120  Demographic Methods (3) Prerequisite: URBPL 5020 or thier equivalents. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Covers in-depth the methodology of demography and population studies including life tables, increment/decrement processes, methods for estimating fertility and reproduction, stable and non-stable population models, modeling vital events, indirect estimation, survival models.

5150  Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs (3) Prerequisite: FCS 2610 and 5170.
   Supervisory principles and intrastaff relations. Administrative functions in private and public pre-kindergarten programs.

5170  Creativity and Cognition: Early Childhood Assessment (3)
   This course focuses on creativity and cognitive development and assessment in early childhood education.

5190  Early Childhood Internship (6) Prerequisite: FCS 2610 and 2620 and 5170.
   An intensive supervised experience that is a pre-requisite to admission to the post-baccalaureate early childhood certification program. Students plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum in an early childhood setting.

5200  Families and Social Policy (3) Prerequisite: FCS 2400.
   Relationship between the family and social environments emphasizing ecology and life-course frameworks in the dependency between the family and kin, school, neighborhood, work, class, and ethnic environments.

5210  Family Life Education (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3200.
   Broad principles of family life education. Surveys models and methods for strengthening interpersonal and family relationships. Helps students plan, implement, and evaluate family life education programs.

5211  Early Childhood Classroom Organization and Management (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 6211. Study of classroom management models and schemes for classroom organization appropriate for early childhood education. Review ans practice of concrete strategies for classroom interaction. Some class time will be devoted to seminar discussions of academic and field experiences. Students enrolled in FCS 6211 will be held to a higher standard of performance and will be assigned additional work.

5220  Early Childhood Language and Literacy (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 6220. Designed to prepare students for teaching language arts in early childhood classrooms. Major topics include: theories and stages of language, reading and writing development, characteristics of young literacy learners, writing as a composing process reading cueing systems, and text characteristics. Students have first-hand experience with different approaches to teaching reading and writing. Additionally, assessment techniques are explored. Students enrolled in FCS 6220 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

5230  Adolescent Development in the Family (3)
   Interaction between parents and adolescents and effects of families on adolescent behavior; needs of families with adolescents.

5240  Mid/Later Life Adult Development and Family Relationships (3) Prerequisite: FCS 1500 and 2400.
   Examines issues related to adult development, intergenerational relationships, grandparenting, and family caregiving in middle and later life.

5250  Theories of Human Development (3) Prerequisite: FCS 2400 and 1500 and 3200. Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   In-depth examination of theories fundamental to the study of human development. Seminar format; discussion intensive.

5260  Early Childhood Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 6260. Acquaints teacher candidates with appropriate methods for teaching mathematics in early childhood classrooms. A concrete, hands-on approach is emphasized, as students learn, develop, and practice methods which promote the acquisition of mathematical concepts in young children as supported by learning theory. Open only to students in the early childhood teacher licensure program. Students enrolled in FCS 6260 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

5261  Motivation and Learning in Early Childhood (3)
   This course is concerned with the psychological, social, and economic factors that create and affect young children from birth to eight years of age. These factors will be examined with special attention given to how they might affect children's participation in schools. Strategies for working with children from diverse populations will be explored.

5270  Early Childhood Natural and Social Science Methods (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 6270. Content, theories, and practices underlying natural and social science teaching in early childhood classrooms. Students develop awareness of key concepts for young children from the natural and social science disciplines, as well as knowledge of children's growth and learning in these areas. Students enrolled in FCS 6270 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

5280  Marriage, Divorce & Remarriage (3)
   Covers the process and dynamics of divorce and remarriage for adults and their children.

5290  Field Practicum: Early Childhood (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 6290. This practicum is the field component to methods classes for the early childhood education program. Observation, teaching, and reflection are important components of this class. Open only to students in the early childhood teacher licensure program. Offered as credit/no credit. Students enrolled in FCS 6290 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

5291  Action Research Seminar: Early Childhood (3) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Historical, social, and professional context of early childhood education. Facilitates an understanding of the philosophy, rationale, and goals of the field. Critical analysis of the societal, economic, and political context of early childhood education.

5295  Student Teaching: Kindergarten (4) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Supervised teaching in the classroom, lesson planning, scheduling, implementation and evaluation of instruction, classroom management and interaction with school personnel. Offered as credit/no credit.

5296  Student Teaching: Primary (5) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Supervised teaching in the classroom, lesson planning, scheduling, implementation and evaluation of instruction, classroom management and interaction with school personnel. Offered as credit/no credit.

5300  Housing and Community Development (3)
   Meets with FCS 6300. Addresses housing issues from historical, human rights, culture, economic, and affordability perspectives, and explores how those perspectives interconnect.

5311  Childhood Health Care I (3) Prerequisite: "C-" or better in FCS 2610, 3215, 5230 AND 5250.
   Junior or senior status with 20 hours of human development courses. Psychosocial needs of children, adolescents, and families in health-care contexts. Topics include an introduction to the field of child life.

5312  Childhood Health Care II (3) Prerequisite: FCS 5311.
   Junior or senior status with hours of human development courses. Techniques for helping children, adolescents, family members to cope effectively with health-care situations.

5350  Family Theories (3) Prerequisite: FCS 1500 and 2400.
   Discussion and analysis of major theories about the family. Emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives.

5370  Family Violence (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   Multidisciplinary study of family violence and abuse including abuse and neglect of children, spouses, and the elderly; psychological, verbal, and sexual abuse, and courtship violence. Different theoretical perspectives for understanding violence in the family; current policy, treatment, and prevention efforts; controversies in studying family violence.

5380  Family Problems (3)
   Examines the social science research in the area of family crisis. Specifically, this course examines problems associated with poverty, violence, divorce, delinquency, death etc.

5390  Gender and Minorities Across the Lifespan (3) Cross listed as GNDR 5390, ETHNC 5290. Fulfills Diversity.
   The primary objective of this class is to analyze the distinctive ways women and minorities experience major life events across the lifespan. The course has three sections: 1) child development as related to gender socialization and racial identity; 2) adolescence and its connection with teen pregnancy, racial attitudes among minority youths, and biculturalism and acculturation among minority adolescents; and 3) adult development and aging among women and elderly of color. Literatures are drawn from psychology, sociology, gender studies, race relations, and ethnic studies.

5400  Families and Economic Policy (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450.
   Economic and political influences on families and interest-group efforts to alter constraints imposed by these policies. Examples drawn from a variety of policies including child care, marriage, education, homeownership, and retirement.

5430  Families, Consumers, and Health (3)
   Covers two broad areas: the interplay among health care delivery, government policy, and consumers, and the role families play in affecting the health of family members. Content emphasis will vary according to the instructor.

5450  Nonprofit Community Organizations (3)
   Meets with FCS 6450, PADMN 6965, POLS 5965, POLS 6965. This course covers the role of community nonprofit organizations in our society, especially their function in community building and engaging citizen participation. This class offers a broad intellectual foundation and applied approach to the guiding theories and philosophy of nonprofit practice and community development. By examining different models of community-based nonprofits, students will get experience exploring relevant issues of public service, funding, evaluation, theories of change, public policy, social capital, and civic engagement.

5510  Investment and Life Insurance Planning for Families (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450 or 3500 or instructor's permission.
   This course has two components: investment and life insurance. The first part provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. The second part introduces students to life insurance decisions in personal financial planning.

5520  Retirement and Benefits Planning for Families (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450 or 3500 or instructor's permission.
   The intent of this course is to provide individuals with knowledge of both retirement plans and employee benefits. The public retirement plans include Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. The private plans include defined benefit and defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. The specifics of the various plans are analyzed as well as non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Employee benefits such as health insurance and disability insurance will also be discussed. Finally, issues that individuals face in retirement such as life-style choices, community choices, and medical issues are discussed.

5530  Income Tax Planning for Families (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450 or 3500 or instructor's permission.
   The course focuses on principles and current law and practice of income taxation and its impact on financial planning for individuals, couples and families in their roles as investors, employees, and business owners.

5540  Estate Planning for Families (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450 or 3500 or instructor's permission.
   The course in estate planning focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client's goals. It is a study of the legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of this process, covering topics such as trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers and related taxes.

5550  Family Financial Planning Capstone (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450 or 3500, FCS 5510, 5520, 5530, and 5540.
   This course will begin with a review of the different areas of financial planning necessary in completing a comprehensive plan of action for clients. During this course students will work on their own and as a group in evaluating personal financial situations through case study review. Students will also enhance their learning through visits from current financial planning professionals who will present cases that deal with different issues that commonly arise in professional financial planning. Students will also learn and discuss their ethical responsibilities to clients. Finally, students will review the different areas of financial planning that will be required to pass the certification exam.

5590  Intensive Spanish, Culture and Community Services in Mexico (4) Cross listed as ETHNC 5590.
   The primary objective of this class is to provide a three-week immersion for our students in Ethnic Studies. Using a variety o pedagogical methods including classroom instruction, host family stays, interaction with Mexican students, and provision of human services, the students will learn Spanish language skills, Mexican history and culture, and economic development as it pertains to the organization and delivery of human services in Mexico.

5600  Environments and Human Behavior (3) Cross listed as PSY 5600.
   Meets with FCS 6600. Reviews and connects research, policies, and physical designs for a variety of physical settings (homes, workplaces, communities) and sociophysical processes (stress, fear of crime, privacy, recreation, place attachment). Often involves vulnerable populations (women, children, elders, minorities) and is tailored to student interests.

5610  Gender, Race, Class, and Community (3) Cross listed as GNDR 5610.
   Examines gender, race, and class as major analytical categories. Students will study how the division of labor, race relations, and the prevailing patriarchal ideologies shape the design of the homes, the development of communities, and the adaptation of women and people of color to the prevailing spatial and social arrangements.

5620  Advanced Environment and Behavior (2 to 3) Prerequisite: FCS 3200 and either FCS 3620 or PSYCH 3420.
   Meets with FCS 5620, FCS 6620, PSYCH 5400, and PSYCH 6400. Graduate students should enroll in a 6000 level section and they will be held to a higher standard or do additional work. Some sections taught with service learning emphasis; see Bennion Center for details. Study of selected environmental settings and environment and behavior processes.

5630  Healthy Communities (3)
   Meets with FCS 6630. A variety of disciplines offer insights into why we live in the place-based communities we currently inhabit their social, physical psychological, and policy contexts. Researchers also advocate for a variety of community criteria to provide healthy and viable settings for humans and the planet. This course examines research from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, sociology, public health, environmental health, and planning, to address threats to and meanings of healthy communities. Graduate students should enroll in FCS 6630 and will be held to a higher standard and/or more work.

5700  Research for Consumer and Community Needs (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3200 or ARCH/URBPL Majors. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Meets with FCS 6700. Capstone class. Students learn to use demographic data to assess the needs of consumers, households, and communities and conduct research projects on changing communities. These analyses are central to understanding a variety of community issues regarding homeownership, household crowding, immigration, racial and ethnic change, education, employment, transportation, and poverty. The course places emphasis on the interface between theory, measurement, and communication of scientific findings. Service learning may be offered on an optional basis.

5730  Community and Environmental Change (3) Cross listed as ENVST 5730.
   Meets with FCS 6730. This course examines the processes and outcomes of community and environmental change. The class will analyze the sociopolitical context in which change operates, the impact of environmental and social changes, major models and methods of practice, and tools to promote public participation. This course provides a theoretical foundation and hands-on experience developing and evaluating community interventions. Special emphasis will be placed on collaborative and participatory planning.

5920  Field Training (1 to 4)

5940  Attachment Theory Across the Lifespan (3) Prerequisite: FCS 5250.
   Meets with FCS 6940. This course takes a lifespan approach to the study of human attachment relationships. Attachment theory, research and clinical application are considered through a seminar format that focuses primarily on reading and discussion.

5950  Undergraduate Research (1 to 4)
   Independent in-depth project under direction of faculty. May include field work.

5962  Special Topics in Human Development and Family Studies (1 to 5)
   Specific content varies.

5964  Special Topics in Consumer Studies and Family Economics (1 to 5)
   Specific content varies.

5966  Special Topics in Environment and Behavior (1 to 5)
   Specific content varies.

5969  Special Topics in Statistics (1 to 6) Cross listed as OIS 5969, ED PS 5969, FP MD 5969, MATH 5969, ECON 5969, PSY 5969, SOC 5969, STAT 5969.
   Topics vary. Taught by members of the University Statistics Committee. Check current class schedule for cross-listings.

6100  Graduate Research Methods (4) Prerequisite: FCS 3200.
   In-depth examination of research design. Students learn how to plan and propose experimental, quasi-experimental, and passive-observational research, using survey, observational, and qualitative approaches to data-gathering. Meets with FCS 5100.

6110  Graduate Multivariate Statistics (4) Prerequisite: FCS 3210.
   Course covers a range of topics on regression analysis. Topics include multiple regression, conducting regression diagnostics, multi-collinearity, interaction effects, repeated measures, and logistic regression. Meets with FCS 5110.

6120  Demographic Methods (3) Prerequisite: URBPL 5020 or thier equivalents. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Covers in-depth the methodology of demography and population studies including life tables, increment/decrement processes, methods for estimating fertility, stable and non-stable population models, modeling vital events, survival models.

6200  Families and Social Policy (3)
   Relationship between the family and social environments emphasizing ecology and life-course frameworks in the dependency between the family and kin, school, neighborhood, work, class, and ethnic environments.

6211  Early Childhood Classroom Organization and Management (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 5211. Study of classroom management models and schemes for classroom organization appropriate for early childhood education. Review ans practice of concrete strategies for classroom interaction. Some class time will be devoted to seminar discussions of academic and field experiences. Students enrolled in FCS 6211 will be held to a higher standard of performance and will be assigned additional work.

6220  Early Childhood Language and Literacy (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 5220. Designed to prepare students for teaching language arts in early childhood classrooms. Major topics include: theories and stages of language, reading and writing development, characteristics of young literacy learners, writing as a composing process reading cueing systems, and text characteristics. Students have first-hand experience with different approaches to teaching reading and writing. Additionally, assessment techniques are explored. Students enrolled in FCS 6220 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

6260  Early Childhood Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 5260. Acquaints teacher candidates with appropriate methods for teaching mathematics in early childhood classrooms. A concrete, hands-on approach is emphasized, as students learn, develop, and practice methods which promote the acquisition of mathematical concepts in young children as supported by learning theory. Open only to students in the early childhood teacher licensure program. Students enrolled in FCS 6260 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

6261  Motivation and Learning in Early Childhood (3)
   This course is concerned with the psychological, social, and economic factors that create and affect young children from birth to eight years of age. These factors will be examined with special attention given to how they might affect children's participation in schools. Strategies for working with children from diverse populations will be explored.

6262  Education Research Methods (3) Prerequisite: Enrollment in Graduate Program.
   This course is designed for the early childhood graduate students in FCS. This course is a historical, descriptive and experimental inquiry where the emphasis is placed on the interpretation of education research. Students will gain an understanding of the conceptual aspects of educational research, and learn how to evaluate and use research to improve scholarship and professional practice in education. Topics include: hypotheses, research designs, data gathering strategies, statistical analysis of data and interpretation.

6270  Early Childhood Natural and Social Science Methods (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 5270. Content, theories, and practices underlying natural and social science teaching in early childhood classrooms. Students develop awareness of key concepts for young children from the natural and social science disciplines, as well as knowledge of children's growth and learning in these areas. Students enrolled in FCS 6270 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

6290  Field Practicum: Early Childhood (3) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Early Childhood Education Program.
   Meets with FCS 5290. This practicum is the field component to methods classes for the early childhood education program. Observation, teaching, and reflection are important components of this class. Open only to students in the early childhood teacher licensure program. Offered as credit/no credit. Students enrolled in FCS 6290 will be held to a higher standard of performance and may be assigned additional work.

6291  Action Research Seminar: Early Childhood (3) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Historical, social, and professional context of early childhood education. Facilitates an understanding of the philosophy, rationale, and goals of the field. Critical analysis of the societal, economic, and political context of early childhood education. Students enrolled in FCS 6291 will be held to a high standard of performance and will be assigned additional work.

6295  Student Teaching: Kindergarten (4) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Supervised teaching in the classroom, lesson planning, scheduling, implementation and evaluation of instruction, classroom management and interaction with school personnel. Offered as credit/no credit.

6296  Student Teaching: Primary (5) Prerequisite: Admission to ECE teacher education program.
   Supervised teaching in the classroom, lesson planning, scheduling, implementation and evaluation of instruction, classroom management and interaction with school personnel. Offered as credit/no credit. Students enrolled in FCS 6296 will be held to higher standard of performance and will be assigned additional work.

6300  Housing and Community Development (3)
   Meets with FCS 5300. Addresses housing issues from historical, human rights, culture, economic, and affordability perspectives, and explores how those perspectives interconnect.

6400  Families and Economic Policy (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3450.
   Economic and political influences on families and interest-group efforts to alter constraints imposed by these policies. Examples drawn from a variety of policies including child care, marriage, education, homeownership, and retirement.

6450  Nonprofit Community Organizations (1 to 3)
   Meets with FCS 5450, PADMN 6965, POLS 5965, POLS 6965. This course covers the role of community nonprofit organizations in our society, especially their function in community building and engaging citizen participation. This class offers a broad intellectual foundation and applied approach to the guiding theories and philosophy of nonprofit practice and community development. By examining different models of community-based nonprofits, students will get experience exploring relevant issues of public service, funding, evaluation, theories of change, public policy, social capital, and civic engagement.

6560  Survey Research Methods (3) Cross listed as PUBPL 6560.
   This course provides students with skills necessary for understanding the survey research process used across the behavioral science disciplines with an emphasis on public policy issues. The goal is to familiarize students with survey design and analysis. Approaches include item construction, sampling, reliability, validity, and data analysis and interpretation.

6563  Program and Policy Evaluation (3) Cross listed as PADMN 6563, POLS 6563, PUBPL 6563. Prerequisite: PADMN 6290 or equivalent.
   Systematic introduction to program and policy evaluation as a basis for accountability. Introduces alternative approaches to evaluation. Emphasis is placed on strategies for impact assessment (including randomized designs and non-randomized designs), measuring efficiency, examining short-term and long-term consequences, identifying both intended and unintended impacts, and the social, political, and ethical context of evaluation.

6600  Environments and Human Behavior (3) Cross listed as PSY 6600.
   Reviews and connects research, policies, and settings that are important contexts from behaviors of households and communities: homes, workplaces, neighborhoods. Focuses on sociophysical processes (stress, community problems, crime, privacy, transportation, place attachment). Often involves vulnerable populations (women, children, elders, the poor) and is tailored to student interests.

6620  Advanced Environment and Behavior (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3620 or PSYCH 3420.
   Meets with FCS 5620, FCS 6620, PSYCH 5400, and PSYCH 6400. Graduate students should enroll in a 6000-level section, and they will be held to a higher standard or do additional work. Some sections taught with service-learning emphasis; see Bennion Center for details. Study of selected environmental settings and environment and behavior processes.

6630  Healthy Communities (3)
   Meets with FCS 5630. A variety of disciplines offer insights into why we live in the place-based communities we currently inhabit their social, physical psychological, and policy contexts. Researchers also advocate for a variety of community criteria to provide healthy and viable settings for humans and the planet. This course examines research from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, sociology, public health, environmental health, and planning, to address threats to and meanings of healthy communities. Graduate students should enroll in FCS 6630 and will be held to a higher standard and/or more work.

6640  Integrated Curriculum Methods (3)
   Students will examine the theoretical, philosophical and practical bases for using an integrated curriculum approach in teaching in an elementary classroom. The course provides students with an in depth knowledge of various models and designs in educational settings that focus on authentic, integrated learning experiences for children. Research on the effectiveness of an integrated curriculum approach will also be addressed. Guest lecturers will provide innovative and practical teaching ideas designed to effectively help children learn.

6650  Advanced Community Psychology (3) Cross listed as PSY 6650.
   The study and application of psychological solutions to community problems and relationships between community environments and individual and family well-being. Graduate students should enroll at the 6000 level and will be held to higher standards or do additional work Some sections service-learning.

6700  Research for Community Needs (3) Prerequisite: FCS 3200 or ARCH/URBPL Majors. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Meets with FCS 5700. Students learn to use demographic data to assess the needs of consumers, households, and communities and conduct research projects on changing communities. These analyses are central to understanding a variety of community issues regarding homeownership, household crowding, immigration, racial and ethnic change, education, employment, transportation, poverty, and urban sprawl. The course places emphasis on the interface between theory, measurement, and communication of scientific findings. Service learning may be offered on an optional basis. Professor has higher expectations from the graduate student.

6730  Community Development & Environmental Change (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   Meets with FCS 5730. This course examines the processes and outcomes of community and environmental change. The class will analyze the sociopolitical context in which change operates, the impact of environmental and social changes, major models and methods of practice, and tools to promote public participation. This course provides a theoretical foundation and hands-on experience developing and evaluating community interventions. Special emphasis will be placed on collaborative and participatory planning.

6901  Thesis Development Seminar I (1)
   Development, presentation, critique, and refinement of thesis proposals by graduate students under faculty supervision.

6902  Thesis Development Seminar II (2)
   Development, presentation, critique, and refinement of thesis proposals by graduate students under faculty supervision.

6940  Attachment Theory Across the Lifespan (3) Prerequisite: FCS 5250.
   Meets with FCS 5940. This course takes a lifespan approach to the study of human attachment relationships. Attachment theory, research and clinical application are considered through a seminar format that focuses primarily on reading and discussion.

6950  Individual Research (1 to 6)
   Individual research projects under the supervision of faculty.

6962  Special Topics Seminar in Human Development & Social Policy (1 to 4)
   Specific content in human development and social policy varies.

6970  Thesis Research: Master's (1 to 6)

6980  Faculty Consultation (1 to 3)
   Graduate level thesis research.


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