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BIOEN Course Descriptions
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University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2012
Posted Mar 02, 2012

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2012, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1010  Careers in Biomedical Engineering (1)
   NOTE: GRADING CR/NC This lecture will introduce students to various career opportunities in the field of biomedical engineering. Guest speakers from industry, clinical practice, and research will discuss aspects of their professional practice, including global, ethical and health-care issues. Each student writes a paper on career choices of potential interest to them in biomedical engineering.

1020  Fundamentals of Bioengineering I (3) Corequisites: (CHEM 1225 AND (CHEM 1220 OR CHEM 1221 OR AP Chem score of 4 or better) AND (MATH 1210 OR MATH 1250 OR MATH 1270 OR MATH 1310 OR MATH 1311)) OR AP Calc AB score of 4 or better OR AP Calc BC score of 4 or better.
   This course begins bioengineering fundamental sequence. The course places an emphasis on biochemistry and bioenergetics and molecular transport, electrochemical gradients, heat and mass transport, and related topics are use to develop basic principles in cellular, organ, and systemic physiology.

1510  Science Without Walls: Science in Your World (3) Fulfills Physical/Life Science Exploration.
   A concept- and inquiry-based television course which focuses on major concepts covering to all areas of science. The course is multi- and interdisciplinary and designed primarily for nonscience majors. It connects science to daily life and activities, including the connections between the sciences, arts, and the humanities.

2100  Fundamentals of Bioengineering II (3) Prerequisites: (MATH 1220 OR MATH 1270 OR MATH 1310 OR MATH 1311 OR MATH 1280 OR MATH 1320 OR MATH 1321) AND ((PHYS 2210 OR PHYS 3210) AND PHYS 2215).
   Bioengineering Fundamentals II applies fundamental laws of physics and chemistry to the analysis of biological systems and the design of biomedical devices. This second semester covers both biomedical and bioelectrical laws and principles. A major physiological modeling project (e.g. cardiovascular or auditory) ties many of the course's topics together.

3070  Applied Math and Statistics for Bioengineers (3) Cross listed as BIOEN 5070. Prerequisites: "C" or better in (BIOEN 3301 AND MATH 2250) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   Introductory course will cover concepts from probability and statistics. Topics will include discrete and continuous random variable, distributions, univariate and multivariate distributions, expected values, moments, normal distribution, and derived distribution; maximum likelihood estimation, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Graduate students will be given extra projects to exemplify concepts learned.

3091  Current Research in Bioengineering (1)
   Seminar in biomedical engineering and bioengineering where faculty present highlights of their current research. The seminar is intended to introduce students to current research in the field and to help students identify potential graduate or undergraduate research projects.

3101  Biosignals Analysis (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MATH 2250 AND (PHYS 2220 OR PHYS 3220) AND PHYS 2225) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering Corequisites: "C" or better in BIOEN 3301
   Signals are essential for both internal coordination and external monitoring of the functions of the body. This course covers the analytical and computational tools used for representing, manipulating, and interpreting signals. Emphasis will be placed on practical application in biomedical sciences, including the origins of biological signals, the physiology of human hearing, and the interpretation of biological images.

3202  Physiology for Engineers (4) Prerequisites: "C" or better in ((BIOL 2020 OR BIOL 2021) AND (CHEM 2310 OR CHEM 2311) AND CHEM 2315) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering Corequisites: "C" or better in BIOEN 3301.
   This course is the second in a two-semester sequence (BIOEN 3201, 3202, Human Physiology I, II) that teaches students to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to cellular and systems physiology, including function, dysfunction, and the mechanisms that underlie treatment. The course also addresses professional and ethical responsibility associated with the development, testing, and implementation (or withholding) of biomedical devices or treatments. Associated laboratory modules teach students to design, conduct, and analyze experiments, and to use the techniques, skills and tools necessary for engineering practice. Topics this semester include the nervous system, striated and smooth muscle, and respiratory, renal, and cardiovascular systems.

3301  Computation Methods for Bioengineers (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MATH 2250 AND (PHYS 2210 OR PHYS 3210) AND PHYS 2215) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering.
   Computers are increasingly indispensable in biomedical engineering research for data acquisition, analysis and modeling. For students that will not have received any programming training, the course covers basic computation skills including data representation, storage, display, descriptive statistics, numerical analysis theory, optimization, and other relevant topics via hands-on exercises based on real biomedical engineering applications. A high-level multi-purpose scientific computing package (e.g., Matlab) will be used.

3801  Biomedical Engineering Design I (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (BIOEN 3301 AND (PHYS 2220 OR PHYS 3220) AND PHYS 2225 AND (BIOEN 3070 OR MATH 3070)) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering.
   Biomedical engineering design covered from an FDA design perspective. Topics include team building, literature searches, and project management. Discussions on economic, environmental, sustainability, manufacturability, ethical, health and safety, social, and political considerations will be included. Students will be assigned to a group to work on a design project that will continue into BIOEN 4801 and will also select and start their BME senior projects for BIOEN 4201. Lecture: 2 hours and Lab: 3 hours.

3900  Special Topics (3) Prerequisites: Full Major Status in Biomedical Engineering
   Introductory course will cover concepts from probability and statistics. Topics will include discrete and continuous random variable, distributions, univariate and multivariate distributions, expected values, moments, normal distribution, and derived distribution; maximum likelihood estimation, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses.

4200  Bioengineering Research (1) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   The course provides research laboratory experience which lays the foundation for the material presented in the lectures associated with BIOEN 4201 and 4202. Research projects in biomedical engineering determined by student and faculty supervisor. May be taken concurrently with 4201 and 4202.

4201  Bioengineering Project I (2) Prerequisites: "C" or better in BIOEN 4200 AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This course uses each student's required senior project as source information that the student will repeatedly present to the class in both a written and oral format. Due the communication emphasis of the class, it along with BIOEN 4202 covers the University's upper-division communication/writing requirement. During the course of the class, each student provides several oral presentations that are followed-up with instructional criticism from the class and the instructor. The students also prepare a progress report and a draft version of their final project poster at the conclusion of the semester that are critiqued and returned at the start of BIOEN 4202 for revision and resubmission.

4202  Senior Projects (2) Prerequisites: "C" or better in BIOEN 4201 Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   This course is a continuation of BIOEN 4201 where each student was required to present his or her senior project. The class requires each student to further refine both the oral and written presentation of his or her senior project to a professional level through additional presentations in several different time formats and through submitted drafts of his or her senior thesis. Due to the communication emphasis of the class, it along with BIOEN 4201 covers the University's upper-division communication/writing requirement. At the conclusion of the semester, each student provides a senior thesis and participates in a public senior project fair where they provide a five-minute oral presentation followed by a twenty-minute poster presentation.

4640  Image Processing Basics (3) Cross listed as CS 4640.
   This course is an introduction to digital image processing. Simply put, image processing is the study of any algorithm that takes an image as input and produces an image as output. Digital images are ubiquitous in today's world, and the number of images available on the internet is exploding. Images are an important form of data in many fields. Examples include microscopy in biology, MRI and CT in medicine, satellite imagery in geology and agriculture, fingerprint and face images in security and many others. Digital image processing is vital in fully harnessing the information in all of this data. Practically every digital image your see today has undergone some form of image processing. Even point-and-shoot digital cameras have a dedicated image processing microchip that performs simple image processing tasks immediately after a photograph is taken. In this course you will learn the basic algorithms of image processing, including image enhancement, filtering, feature detection, geometric transforms, color processing, and compression. The goals of this course are to give you the understanding of how image processing algorithms work and what algorithms to apply to a given problem, and also the foundation necessary to develop your own image processing algorithms.

4801  Biomedical Engineering Design II (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in BIOEN 3801
   Continuation of BIOEN 3801. Initial designs will be prototyped before going through a design review. Design validation issues and improvements will then be solved in a redesign phase following a design process based on FDA-QSR. Projects will be team oriented and lead to increased project management skills. In addition, discussions on design considerations will continue. A final written design document and an oral presentation of the working prototype will culminate the class. Lecture: 1 hour and Lab: 6 hours.

4990  Internships and Co-ops (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   This directed study course is designed to provide academic credit for internships and co-op experiences in bio-, biomedical engineering and closely related fields. Students must submit a written proposal describing the work to be completed for course credit to the instructor to obtain permission to enroll. The proposal must also include a brief description of the sponsor including contact information for the student's immediate supervisor. Proposals are evaluated and approved for course credit on the basis of programmatic educational merit.

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   Restriced to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

5001  Biotransport/Biomolecular (4) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (BIOEN 3301 AND (PHYS 2220 OR PHYS 3220) AND PHYS 2225 AND (BIOEN 3070 OR MATH 3070)) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering. Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   This intermediate-level 4 credit-hour course is focused on the application of physical principles to 1) develop quantitative understanding of biophysical processes in natural and engineered molecules, membranes, tissues and organs and to 2) apply biophysical principles to the solution of biomedical engineering problems related to health and the human condition.

5020  Interactive Science Exhibits (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   An independent project course involving the design, development, implementation, and testing of interactive science/technology exhibits/activities for science centers or museums. Students may work individually or in groups.

5070  Applied Math and Statistics for Bioengineers (3) Cross listed as BIOEN 3070. Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   Introductory course will cover concepts from probability and statistics. Topics will include discrete and continuous random variable, distributions, univariate and multivariate distributions, expected values, moments, normal distribution, and derived distribution; maximum likelihood estimation, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Graduate students will be given extra projects to exemplify concepts learned.

5101  Biosystems Analysis and Modeling (4) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (BIOEN 3101 AND BIOEN 3301) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   The goals of this course are to apply and soldify the techniques developed in the Biosignals Analysis course through a series of examples and explore the electronic implementation of associated devices. Again, the strategy will be heavily linked to specific examples and hands-on experience, this time through lab exercises. Example systems for this course include pulse oxymetry, real time glucose monitoring, ultrasound based flow measurements, and fluorescence imaging. In each example, the goal will be to build at least prototype devices using modular electonic elements. A further goal of the course will be to develop basic modeling approaches and apply them to a system from the BIOEN 3202 Physiology for Engineers class, which students would normally be taking together with this course.

5201  Biomechanics (4) Prerequisites: "C" or better in (MATH 2250 AND BIOEN 3301) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering Fulfills Quantitative Intensive BS.
   Fundamental principles of mechanics applied to the study of biological systems. Passive mechanical behaviors of biological materials, measurement of nonlinear strain in tissues, arterial flow, mechanical interactions of implants with tissue, skeletal muscle mechanics, segmental biomechanics, and control of motion. Includes laboratory experience in material covered in lecture.

5301  Introduction to Modern Biomaterials (4) Cross listed as MSE 5040. Prerequisites: "C" or better in ((BIOL 2020 OR BIOL 2021) AND (CHEM 2310 OR CHEM 2311) AND CHEM 2315) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering.
   This course is designed to introduce students to the various classes of biomaterials in use and their application in selected subspecialties of medicine including an understanding of material bulk and surface properties, standard characterization tools, the various biological responses to implanted materials, the clinical context of their use, manufacturing processes, and issues dealing with cost, sterilization, packaging, and design of biomedical devices. It also addresses professional and ethical responsibility encountered in designing medical implants.

5401  Medical Imaging Systems (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in ((PHYS 2220 OR PHYS 3220) AND PHYS 2225 AND BIOEN 3301) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering.
   Medical imaging offers a means to noninvasively visualize the anatomy and/or physiology of the body, and plays a vital role in the detection, diagnosis and monitoring under therapy of diseases. The course provides an overview of the underlying physics, image formation theories, and selected applications of major imaging systems, including x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging.

5460  Engineering Aspects of Clinical Medicine: Theory and Practice (2) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   The course acquaints upper level undergraduate and beginning graduate students with the role technology plays in everyday clinical practice. Five or six different medical technologies, such as joint replacements, medical imaging, gait analysis, etc., will be explored. For each, the nature of the clinical condition being treated will be presented along with an explanation of the physical and engineering principles behind the technology being used to treat or diagnose the condition. The following week, the class will visit the appropriate clinic to observe the procedure and discuss what is going on from a clinical, ethical, and societal point of view with an attending physician.

5480  Principles of Ultrasound (3) Cross listed as ECE 5480. Prerequisites: "C" or better in (PHYS 2220 OR PHYS 3220) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   Acoustic-wave propagation in biological materials with examples of practical medical instrumentation resulting from ultrasound interactions with biological structures. Recent Therapeutic ultrasound application will also be discussed.

5501  Biomolecular Engineering (3) Prerequisites: "C" or better in ((BIOL 2020 OR BIOL 2021)AND CHEM 3510) AND Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering.
   Explores the use of biomolecules as new engineering materials, or as functional interfaces with conventional engineering materials. Topics include biomolecular synthesis, structure, and biological functions; protein design, methods to modify protein structure and function; applications of proteins as materials and as transducers; and goals and opportunities in biomolecular engineering.

5601  Scanning Electron Microscopy (3 to 4) Prerequisites: Full Major Status in Biomedical Engineering
   Review of vacuum technology, electron sources and electron optics. Components of the electron microscope, their principles of operation and failure modes. Aspects of image quality and their optimization. Review of atomic physics and characteristics x-ray emission. Principles and operation of instrumentation for Elemental Determination by Analysis of X-rays. Generation and calibration of standards.

5900  Special Topics (1 to 4) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   One-time courses in highly specialized areas of biomedical engineering not covered by department or university curricula, provided by visiting faculty, regular faculty, and/or members of the biomedical industrial community.

5950  Independent Studies in Biomedical Engineering (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Full Major status in Biomedical Engineering
   Independent projects in biomedical engineering determined by student and faculty supervisor.

6000  Systems Physiology I: Cardiovascular, Respiratory... (4) Cross listed as PHYSL 6000. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Open to medical and other graduate students. Emphasizes physiological principles of major organ systems such as cardiovascular, renal and respiratory. Course includes 1 credit hour lab work covering material in lecture. Lab fee $50.

6002  Molecular Biophysics (3)
   This intermediate-level 3 credit-hour course is focused on the application of physical principles to: 1) develop quantitative understanding of biophysical processes in natural and engineered macromolecules, membranes, and tissues, 2) learn about modern biophysical methods capturing single molecule properties, and to 3) apply biophysical principles to the solution of biomedical engineering problems.

6003  Cellular Biophysics and Electrophysiology (3) Cross listed as PHYSL 6003. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   A companion course to BIOEN 6460. Topics include membrane and cellular biophysics and electrophysiology of excitable membranes in heart and brain. Lecture and a few laboratory exercises. The prerequisite for the course is the permission of the instructor; strongly recommended background knowledge includes previous exposure to basic electrophysiology (e.g., PHYSL 6000 or equivalent), university level calculus and physics. Homework assignments will require the use of Matlab and electronic submission of reports.

6005  Computational Neuroscience (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   This course focuses on use of computational models to explore classical and modern problems in neurophysiology, including the integrative properties of single neurons, representation of sensory stimuli in single neurons and neuronal populations, pattern representation and completion in neural networks, and mechanisms of learning and adaptive behavior. Students are expected to perform a substantial amount of programming in problem sets and a course project.

6010  Systemic Physiology II (3) Cross listed as PHYSL 6010. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   This course focuses on information processing and motor control mechanisms in vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, and on the roles of the endocrine system in humans and insects. Students also give presentations on topics of special interest to themselves related to neural and endocrine physiology.

6050  Cellular Physiology (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Overview of cellular organization and basic genetic mechanisms. Emphases on integrative and specialized cellular events that pertain to various organ systems. Includes 1 credit hour lab work covering material in lecture.

6060  Scientific Presentation (1)
   Students will learn how to organize and give effective written and oral technical presentations for scientific meetings.

6061  Scientific Presentation II (1)
   Continuation of BIOEN 6060. The course is designed to introduce bioengineering graduate students to standard scientific presentation formats and to forum to practice/improve oral and written communication skills. Departmental seminar attendance is required.

6062  Biomedical Engineering Literature Survey (1) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Students will read and discuss primary research literature focused within an area of biomedical engineering selected by the instructor.

6065  Biotransport (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Introduces the basic principles of transport phenomena, with emphases on applying key transport concepts in the development of artificial organs and controlled drug delivery systems.

6080  Ideas into Dollars: Writing Grant Proposals (2)
   Writing, critiquing, and evaluating fundable grant proposals in science and engineering. Each student will write a full proposal during the semester.

6081  Biomedical Device Innovation I (4)
   First semester of a two semester graduate level project based learning class focused on medical device design and documentation within the regulatory framework of FDA QSR, business plan development, and business startup concepts. This course will bring together students in medicine and medical residency, traditional engineering students, business, and law students for a multidisciplinary experience in medical product innovation. The medical device ideas will be produced and refined through a summer clinical immersion course where students are exposed to clinical environments and identify unmet needs through interaction with the environment, clinicians, and patients. During the first semester (design input phase), students will design, prototype, and document a medical device using FDA requirements for design control. To accomplish this goal, all projects will utilize customer driven inputs to motivate the development of product specifications. Prototypes will then be developed based upon these specifications. To provide students with the training in device development, two weekly lab sessions will be held to focus on machine shop tools and prototyping. There will also be two lectures per week to introduce concepts including FDA QSR, design documentation, project management, software and hardware tools, and risk management. Outputs of this phase include design input documentation (project plan, design requirements, design specifications).

6082  Biomedical Device Innovation II (4)
   Second semester of a two semester graduate level project based learning class focused on medical device design and documentation within the regulatory framework of FDA QSR, business plan development, and business startup concepts. This course will bring together students in medicine and medical residency, traditional engineering students, business, and law students for a multidisciplinary experience in medical product innovation. During the second semester (design output phase), prototypes are reined and tested to ensure requirements are met. In addition to device development, students will develop a business plan around the medical device to understand commercial translation concepts including financials, markets, marketing, sales, competition, risk, and business models. Students will develop business plan requirements and subsequently a full business plan throughout the semester. Business plans will be entered into business plan competitions and funding sources will be identified for future company formation. This course includes two lab sessions per week one focused on medical device testing and another on business plan development. Two lecture sessions per week will cover topics including: verification testing, design validation, clinical trails, technology commercialization, ethics, business concepts, and company formation. Outputs of is semester include: medical device prototype, design and testing documentation, business plan, and competition entry.

6090  Department Seminar (0.5)
   Presentations will be made by faculty and guest speakers from outside the department and university.

6091  Department Seminar (0.5)
   Presentations will be made by faculty and guest speakers from outside the department and university.

6102  Bioinstrumentation Lecture (3)
   The fundamentals of bioinstrumentation: sources of biological signals, physics of biosignal transducers, analog and digital circuit elements, basic electrical circuit theory, signal conditioning, and signal analysis techniques.

6140  Fundamentals of Tissue Engineering (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Cellular attachment, extracellular matrix biochemistry and tissue organization, cell culture, synthetic polymetric membranes, methods of cell encapsulation, biohybrid artificial organs, artificial cells, skin, bone, cartilage, liver. Additional class time will allow for additional context, specifically economic analysis and ethical considerations of tissue engineering products.

6181  Clinical Problem Solving Through Strategic Analysis I (3)
   First semester of a two semester course sequence focused on the process of strategic analysis of complex clinical problem solving through evaluation of diagnostic processes, current therapeutic approaches, and clinical outcomes. Students will learn to critically evaluate real-world clinical problems from a global perspective, and then identify diagnostic and therapeutic deficiencies that can be addressed through the process of innovating medical technologies. The academic-based lectures in clinical problem solving through bioinnovation will be reinforced through applied application of course material in clinic-based workshops. The course will provide the academic foundation for mastery of the entire spectrum of the problem solving process from clinical needs finding to need analysis, concept generation and refinement to prototyping, intellectual property protection, and business planning. The text-based lecture series will be complimented with interactive lectures that provide real-world examples of the medical innovation process given by guest lecturers who have successfully navigated the strategic biodesign process and impacted healthcare through innovating technologies. The first semester of this course sequence will focus on clinical needs finding, needs screening, concept generation, and concept selection.

6182  Clinical Problem Solving Through Stategic Analysis II (3)
   Second semester of a two semester course sequence focused on the process of strategic analysis of complex clinical problem solving through evaluation of diagnostic processes, current therapeutic approaches, and clinical outcomes. Students will learn to critically evaluate real-world clinical problems from a global perspective, and then identify diagnostic and therapeutic deficiencies that can be addressed through the process of innovating medical technologies. The academic-based lectures in clinical problem solving through bioinnovation will be reinforced through applied application of course material in clinic-based workshops. The course will provide the academic foundation for mastery of the entire spectrum of the problem solving process from clinical needs finding to need analysis, concept generation and refinement to prototyping, intellectual property protection, and business planning. The text-based lecture series will be complimented with interactive lectures that provide real-world examples of the medical innovation process given by guest lecturers who have successfully navigated the strategic biodesign process and impacted healthcare through innovating technologies. The second semester of this course sequence will focus on case studies, regulatory compliance, marketing and stackholders, business strategies, financing, and business development.

6202  Biomechanics Lecture (3)
   Meets with BIOEN 5201, 6201.

6230  Functional Anatomy for Engineers (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Meets with ME EN 7120. Human musculo-skeletal system explored in lecture and cadaver dissection, focusing on torso, back, hip, neck and shoulder, hand, wrist, elbow, and knee. Emphasis is placed on function, biomechanics, and modeling.

6240  Movement Analysis (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Introduction to the analysis of the kinematics and kinetics of human movement in two and three dimensions with emphasis on methods used in motion capture, including joint and segment position; acceleration, velocity, force and torque; work and power; and inverse solution methods.

6302  Biomaterials (3) Cross listed as PHCEU 6020.
   Chemical, physical, and biological properties of synthetic polymer, metal, and ceramic biomaterials. Relationship between the structure of biomaterials and their interaction with blood, soft, and hard tissue. Mechanical properties, fabrication, and degradation mechanisms, and performance testing of materials in biomedical use.

6310  Physics of X-Ray and Ultrasound (3) Cross listed as ECE 6110.
   Physical aspects and principles of X-ray, CT and ultrasound radiology, including an overview of the hardware related to these medical-imaging modalities.

6320  Physics of Nuclear Medicine and MRI (3) Cross listed as ECE 6120.
   Physical aspects and principles of nuclear medicine and MRI, including an investigation into the design of hardware related to these medical imaging modalities.

6330  Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging for students interested in entering MRI research. Topics covered include nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon (origin an behavior of nuclear magnetization), theory and implementation of Fourier imaging, hardware instrumentation, and practical MRI considerations (SNR and Artifacts)

6405  Nanomedicine (3)
   Meets with PHCEU 7230. Successful research and development in nanomedicine require the interaction of a multitude of disciplines including chemistry, materials science and engineering, cellular biology, pharmaceutical sciences and clinical translational research. This interdisciplinary course will span the spectrum of how such materials are fabricated, characterized, interact with the biological environment, used in specific biomedical applications and translated from concept to the clinic and commercialization. Topics to be taught by experts in the respective areas will include fundamentals of nanomedicine , bottom up and top down approaches to nanofabrication, conjugation strategies, physicochemical characterization, cellular uptake and toxicity, biodistribution, clinical and preclinical nanomedicine as well as special topics in nanobiosensors, nanofluidics, polymer therapeutics and commercialization of nanomedicine products.

6421  Fundamentals of Micromachining Processes (3) Cross listed as MSE 6421, ECE 6221, ME EN 6050. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Meets with ECE 5221 and ME EN 5050. Introduction to the principles of micromachining technologies. Topics include photolithography, silicon etching, thin film deposition and etching, electroplating, polymer micromachining, and bonding techniques. A weekly lab and a review of micromachining applications is included. Graduate students only. Extra work required.

6422  Biomedical Applications of Micromachining (2) Cross listed as ECE 5222. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Meets with ECE 6222. Use of the technologies from the first course in the series (ECE/BIOEN 5221) to investigate biomedical applications of micromachining. Course focuses on the design and development of microsensor/actuator systems; laboratory focus is on the fabrication and testing of microscale sensor/actuator systems. Laboratory included. Undergraduate students only.

6423  Microsystems Design and Characterization (4) Cross listed as MET E 6055, MSE 6055, ECE 6225, ME EN 6055, CH EN 6659. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Meets with ME EN 5055, ECE 5225, MET E 5055, MSE 5055, CH EN 5659. Third in a 3-course series on Microsystems Engineering. This course generalizes microsystems design considerations with practical emphasis on MEMS and IC characterization/physical analysis. Two lectures, one lab per week, plus 1/2 hour lab lecture. Must also register for ME EN 6056 (0-credit lab with fees). Graduate students only. Extra work required.

6430  Systems Neuroscience: Functioning of the Nervous System (4) Cross listed as NEUSC 6050.
   Understanding how the brain works is one of the deepest and most exciting challenges confronting modern science. This course will explore systems-level functioning of the nervous system, beginning with relatively concrete issues of sensory coding and motor control, and expanding into more abstract, but equally important, higher-order phenomena, such as language, cognitive and mood disorders, states of arousal, and experience-dependent modifications of neuronal operations.

6440  Neural Engineering (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Physiological, anatomical, and materials science fundamentals of electrical neuroprosthetics, the design of functional interfaces to the human nervous system.

6460  Electrophysiology & Bioelectricity (3) Cross listed as PHYSL 6460. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Course content has become more focused than previous version; will concentrate on electrophysiology and bioelectricity at the tissue and whole organ level for heart and brain. Course has run successfully for 5 years; required for new BE track.

6464  Cardiac Electrophysiology and Biophysics Seminar (1) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   This course addresses professional and ethical responsibility associated with the development, testing, and implementation of cardiac electrophysiology research. The course specifically will focus on understanding experimental model and protocol choices, with special emphasis on determining whether manuscripts rigorously follow the scientific process.

6480  Biomechanics Seminar (1) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Discussion of faculty and graduate student research in biomechanical topics. Students present progress on their research projects. Discussions of research in progress; presentation of posters or conference presentations before national meetings; and an opportunity to receive feedback on new ideas or research directions. Some knowledge of or interest in biomechanics is recommended.

6500  Mathematical Foundations of Imaging (3)
   Mathematical Foundations of Imaging, including Linear Systems, Probability and Random Variables and, Detection and Estimation Theory. Topics in Linear Systems include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals. Topic in Probability and Random Variables include distribution functions, density functions, expectations, means, variances, combinatorial probability, joint distribution, independence, correlation, Bayes theorem, the law of large numbers, and the central limit theorem. Topic in Detection and Estimation Theory include detection of signals in noise, estimation of signal parameters, linear estimation theory.

6610  Advances in Vision Research (3)
   Meets with NEUSC 6500. Clinical ophthalmology correlated will be overviewed in conjunction with active research areas in macular degeneration, glaucoma, corneal injury, diabetes, congenital syndromes, cortical blindness, and other significant causes of blindness. This course will interface eye research in angiogenesis, devices (e.g., drug delivery, intraocular lenses, lasers, pressure control), signal transduction, neuroprotection, artificial vision (cortical prostheses), advances imaging technologies, genetics, & immunology. A key objective of this class is to relate research efforts to the context & vital needs in the prevention & treatment of blindness.

6640  Introduction to Digital Image Processing (3) Cross listed as CS 6640.
   This is an introductory course in processing grey-scale images. This course will cover both mathematical fundamentals and implementation. It will introduce students to the basic principles of processing digital signals and how those principles apply to images. These fundamentals will include sampling theory, transforms and filtering. The course will also cover a series of basic image-processing problems including enhancement, reconstruction, segmentation, feature detection, and compression. Assignments will include several projects with implementations and analysis of real data.

6670  Genomic Signal Processing (3)
   In this course, for graduate and advanced undergraduate students from the Colleges of Engineering, Sciences and Pharmacy and the School of Medicine, we will discuss: (a) Technologies for high-throughout acquisition of molecular biological data on genomic and proteomic scales, such as DNA and protein arrays; (b) Databases and large-scale datasets generated by national and international consortia as well as individual research groups using these technologies; (c) Mathematical analysis and modeling of these data using ideas from signal processing, numerical computation and information systems; and (d) Biological and medical predictions made by these analyses and models, their experimental tests and their applications toward better understanding of basic biology as well as improved medical diagnosis treatment and drug design.

6760  Modeling and Analysis of Biological Networks (3) Cross listed as ECE 6760, CS 6760.
   Introduction to methods for modeling, analysis, and design of genetic circuits. A particular emphasis will be given to methods inspired by those used by engineers for circuit analysis. Other topics include: learning methods such as Bayesian analysis, differential equation models, stochastic analysis using Monte Carlo methods, reaction-based and logical abstraction, and synthetic genetic circuit design.

6810  Medical Imaging Seminar (1)
   The Medical Imaging Seminar is designed to give graduate students exposure to various topics within Medical Imaging.

6900  Special Topics (1 to 4)
   One-time courses in highly specialized areas of biomedical engineering not covered by department or university curricula, provided by visiting faculty, regular faculty, and/or members of the biomedical industrial community.

6910  Independent Study (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Topics in biomedical engineering selected by student in consultation with faculty.

6920  Internship Program in Bioengineering (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Research projects in a nonacademic applied-bioengineering environment.

6930  Special Project (1 to 3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Independent projects in biomedical engineering, as determined by student and faculty supervisor.

6960  Research Project: M.E. (3)

6970  Thesis Research: M.S. (1 to 12)

6980  Faculty Consultation: Master's (2 to 3)

7111  Physicochemical Approach to Proteins and Nucleic Acids (3) Cross listed as PHCEU 7410. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Applying physicochemical theory and molecular modeling to protein, peptide, and nucleic acid structure and stabilization.

7120  Biocompatibility (2) Cross listed as PHCEU 7210. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Biocompatibility of soluble and insoluble (crosslinked) polymers. Biocompatibility of biomaterials used as implants, blood substitutes, and carriers of bioactive molecules. Biorecognition of synthetic macromolecules on cellular and subcellular levels. Biodegradability and immunogenicity of biomaterials.

7130  Pharmaceutical Applications of Colloid and Interfacial Science (2) Cross listed as PHCEU 7220.
   Colloid, interfacial, and electrokinetic theories applied to the design of drug formulations, drug delivery, and therapeutic efficacy.

7140  Advanced Topics in Tissue Engineering (2) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   The course provides advanced graduate students with an opportunity for in-depth study in a specialized area of tissue engineering. Each student works closely with the instructor to develop a comprehensive, educational oral and written presentation of a selected topic in one of the following areas: new biomaterials designed for tissue engineering; biological signals and signalling mechanisms; delivery and phenotypic expression of transplanted cells; normal and directed healing mechanisms; ontogenic development of tissues and glands; and stem cells and growth factor delivery and applications.

7150  Introduction to Biomimetic Engineering (2)
   Integration of energy transduction and transport of matter found in living systems with mimetic engineering of the same processes in laboratory. After studying selected biological examples, students design a biomimetic system that performs an identical or similar function and measures its performance. The course consists of laboratory experiments, tutorial, and a set of lectures. The tutorials are designed to teach students how to culture and use cells, design membrane mimetic surfaces using Langmuir-Blodgett trough and liposomes, use fluorescent markers and modern spectroscopic and optical microscopic techniques, such as DIC and 3-D confocal microscopy.

7160  Physical Nature of Surfaces (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Concepts of surfaces and interfaces, intermolecular interactions, thermodynamics of interfaces, interface electrical potentials, electrical double layer, and electrokinetic phenomena. Basic principles of surface and interface science as applied to solid materials.

7168  Proteins at Interfaces and in Membranes (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Behavior of protein at interfaces in biological and man-made systems. Structure and dynamics of interfaces are reviewed from the protein adsorption point of view together with modern methods for studies of interfacial protein behavior. Protein adsorption models are presented from a thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. The cell adhesion is considered as a protein-mediated event. Each student is assigned a protein project in which he/she uses the molecular graphics to predict interfacial protein interactions.

7210  Biosolid Mechanics (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Constitute laws for bio-viscoelastic fluids, solids and mixtures; mechanical properties of blood vessels, ligaments, muscle, bone, and cartilage, nonlinear continuum and multiphasic models of tissues.

7220  Biofluid Mechanics (3) Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   Selected topics from physiological fluid dynamics, including aquatic animal propulsion, animal flight, respiratory flow patterns, blood flow and pulse propagation, rheology of blood flow in the microcirculation.

7310  Advanced Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3) Cross listed as ECE 7310, RDLGY 7310. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   In-depth study of physics and mathematics of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy as they relate to the imaging of biologic systems: NMR physics, Block's equations, pulse sequences, flow and diffusion phenomena, spectroscopy principles, methodology. Laboratory.

7320  3-D Reconstruction Techniques in Medical Imaging (3) Cross listed as ECE 7320, RDLGY 7320. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing OR Instructor's Consent
   The course focuses on the problem of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from line integrals, which constitute a mathematical model of measurements in computed tomography (CT), and particularly x-ray computed tomography. Analytical and iterative reconstruction methods are investigated for various geometries of data acquisition. A critical goal is to provide the student with the essential tools required to understand papers on tomographic image reconstruction, from x-ray CT to emission CT, and also with a clear understanding of how efficient and accurate reconstruction algorithms are designed, using the Fourier slice theorem and backprojection techniques. MATLAB laboratories and a computer project are given in support of the theory.

7330  Modern Positron Emission Tomography (3) Cross listed as RDLGY 7330.
   The course begins with an introduction to PET imaging and physics, the image formation process, and how PET is a molecular imaging modality. Theory and algorithms for iterative tomographic image reconstruction will be introduced. The course will conclude with a study of objective measures of PET image quality, including ROC analysis methods and numerical observers. At completion, the student will have an understanding of the PET image formation process and common applications of PET imaging.

7970  Thesis Research: Ph.D. (1 to 12)

7980  Faculty Consultation: Ph.D. (3)

7990  Continuing Registration: Ph.D. (0)


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