University of Utah
Sociology
SOC Course Descriptions
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University of Utah

General Catalog Summer 2011
Posted Feb 07, 2011

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Feb 07, 2011, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1010  Introduction to Sociology (4) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   An introduction to the basic nature of society and the relationship between society and the individual. This course focuses on how society functions and is organized, and how society impacts and influences individual motivation, understanding, action, and well-being. Basic sociological ideas regarding social relations, social interaction, social structure, and social change are examined. Students are introduced to key issues addressed by contemporary sociologists; class, race, gender, sexuality, religion, globalization, education, health care, crime, the media, and the environment. The knowledge gained in these course will aid students in future studies within a variety of fields and careers, and encourage the development of critical thinking about important issues.

1015  Doing Sociology: An introduction to Social Research (2)
   An introduction to basic concepts and tools central to social scientific data analysis, including: basic forms of presentation (e.g., tables, charts, trendlines, scatterplots); basic tools of analysis (e.g., cross-tabulations, correlation, regression, statistical significance); and fundamental concepts of research design (e.g; sampling, causation, independent and dependent variables). This course provides a foundation for subsequent courses throughout the Sociology major. It is organized around online exercises addressing basic issues of sociological interest and teaches students to explore patterns in data, to conduct analyses, and to interpret findings.

1020  Current Social Problems in America (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   A course designed to prepare students to think critically and participate intelligently in public debates on contemporary social problems. Topics may include the causes and consequences of structural inequality, institutional and financial crises, sexual harassment and rape, illicit drug use, racism and hate crimes, unplanned population growth, terrorism, homelessness, residential and educational segregation, and environmental degradation.

3020  Social Psychology (3) Prerequisite: SOC 1010 or PSY 1010 or instructor's consent.
   This introductory course has three inter-related focal points: (1) interactive human experiences in social settings, (2) social influence and networking processes, and (3) social behavior in intimate relationships, groups, organizations, and diverse cultures. Using a sociological perspective, lectures and readings draw upon research findings from surveys, experiments, and observational studies to explore these three focal points together with specific applications in the areas of criminal justice, public health, and the human environment. Internet-based student research projects are integrated wtih the course's theoretical content.

3030  Social Structure and Change (3) Prerequisite: SOC 1010.
   This course analyzes classical and contemporary theories of social structure and explores the mechanisms of social process and the transformation of social structure. The course is designed to provide students with intellectural tools to analyze current issues and problems in a wide variety of social structures including small group, organizations, communities, countries, and world society.

3041  Sociology of Rock and Roll (3) Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   It has been about 60 years since the popular musical genre called rock and roll or rock 'n' roll made its appearance. Some even argue that it can trace its roots further back still to the mid-19th century in Manhattan's Five Points district where African and European influences combined to shape a new musical style. Whatever its roots and early beginnings, from its inception, rock and roll music has been a distinctly American blend with elements of blues, rhythms and blues, country, folk and gospel music. This wedding of musical styles in U.S. history with concomitant implications for social relations-race-and classed-based at the outset-is the central, focus of this course. Fundamentally, this course is a historical, theoretical, and ultimately, sociological exploration of rock and roll music. The course will examine rock music from its roots, to its appearance it the late 1940s and early 1950s, to its evolution throughout the 20th century and into the 21st century. Students will be invited to explore the socio-cultural aspects reflected in and affected by this popular music including race and class relationships as well as some of the ways that institutions help to reinforce and shape musical genres.

3042  Sociology of Film (3)
   The primary goal of this course is to use movies, documentaries, and docudramas to illuminate sociological phenomena and events in terms of sociological theory, concepts, and research, and thus help students to understand and apply core sociological concepts and theories and apply them to a number of movies watched in class and outside of class. Students will also evaluate movies in terms of the extent to which they uncritically transmit bias, stereotypes, ideology, and misinformation regarding gender, race ethnicity, poverty, and important social problems. The films addressed in the course will include dramas, comedies, foreign films, musicals, contemporary Hollywood films, older films, classics, foreign films, documentaries, silent films, animated films, and docudramas. In their analysis and criticism of movies, students will be encouraged to utilize what C. Wright Mills described as "The Sociological Imagination," to more deeply understand the relationship between individual well-being and the nature and structure of society.

3051  The Digital Society (3)
   New information technologies based on digital platforms proliferate in our society. Such technologies now affect everyday life, groups, personal identity, culture, safety, and virtually all aspects of existence. From a sociological standpoint, The Digital Society is so pervasively a part of our world as to be almost invisible. Therefore, the necessity of recognizing the impacts of such technologies on us as individuals as well as the societal repercussions is of increasing importance. Emphasis in such a course of study will be placed on understanding the beginnings and development of digitalization, the internet in its many manifestations, online subcultures, gaming, privacy, information management, cyber-terrorism and bullying, business and corporate interface, identity, key individuals within the subject, relationships, criminal overtones, government interfaces, law, virtual worlds, and mass media.

3061  Sociology of Sports (3)
   This course explores the ways in which sports are entangled in social, cultural, political, and economic forces operating at many different levels, from the social psychological levels to the global level. On one hand the course deals with the multiple ways in which individuals can participate in sports, including our participation in sport for purposes of recreation and leisure, sports participation as self-expression and person fulfillment, participation as spectators of sports and consumers of sports and sports organizations as particular representation of social organizations in general that can be analyzed in terms of goals and norms, social roles, manifest and latent functions, and replete with all the complex social dynamics that characterize other social organizations, such as stratification (e.g., by race, class, and gender). The course will also deal with the political economy of big time sports, including major university and professional sports and their contradictory relationships to their institutional settings (e.g., in institutions of higher learning and in communities).

3111  Research Methods (3) Prerequisite: SOC 1010.
   This course introduces students to systematic methods that organize the research process and the multiple forms of research that it includes. The course explains the logic of research design, explores some common forms of data-gathering (such as interviews, surveys, observation, etc.), and links them to issues of data reporting. The course provides basic research skills for use to students as either original producers or critical consumers of social research.

3112  Social Statistics (4) Prerequisite: SOC 1010 and MATH 1010 Fulfills Quan Reason (Stat/Logic) & Quant Intensive BS.
   The goal of this course is to enable students to both calculate and interpret statistical analyses within the context of social science research. The course introduces basic concepts of statistical analysis, both in theory (lectures) and practice (labs). The course begins with a discussion of descriptive statistics, including frequency distributions, graphs, and measures of central tendency and variability. Next, the course examines relationships between variables and measures of association, including bivariate regression and correlations. The course concludes with an introduction to inferential statistics, including t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square.

3140  Introduction to Sociological Theory (3) Prerequisite: SOC 1010.
   This course provides students with a specific background to a wide variety of perspectives and theories inherent to sociology as a discipline, and identifies different points of view that provides multiple interpretations of major global and national social changes and their impact on social structure, cultures, and social institutions.

3200  Diversity Service Learning (4) Prerequisite: One Sociology course or instructor's consent.
   Students will gain practical "hands on" diversity experience in an organizational setting by being placed into one of over 25 city, state, federal or private agencies for whom diversity issues related to race and ethnicity, social class and/or gender are well known to play a significant role. Whenever possible, students' interests and prior academic training will be utilized in determining placements. Service learning courses are intended to provide a means of integrating a student's prior and current academic training with "real world" experience. Thought provoking diversity readings and websites, in-class discussions and online student interactions also form part of the course. Meets once per week.

3310  Special Topics-Diversity & Inequality (3)

3334  Class and Inequality in America (3)
   Nature and scope of social-stratification dimensions (e.g., power, prestige, wealth) and functions of stratification in the United States.

3337  Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (3) Cross listed as GNDR 3337. Fulfills Diversity & Soc/Beh Sci Exploration.
   Through readings, lectures, discussions, and film, students explore theories and research on sex and gender differences, gender inequality, and sexuality across societies. Using a sociological lens, students examine how gender and gender inequality shape, and are shaped by, a variety of institutions, such as families, schools, and the workplace. The course also addresses how gender is implicated in cultural definitions of work, violence, intimacy, sexuality, physical attractiveness, and other social phenomena.

3365  Ethnic Minorities in America (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 3365. Fulfills Diversity & Soc/Beh Sci Exploration.
   Did you know that a young, urban, black American male is less likely to live to the age of 40 then a young man in a Third World nation? Sociologists and other social scientists are currently describing a disturbing amount of racial and ethnic inequality in the U.S. This course is a historical, theoretical, and ultimately, sociological exploration of American inequality through an examination of racial/ethnic groups and women in the United States.

3380  Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Gender (3) Cross listed as GNDR 3380. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. Fulfills Diversity.
   This course is an historical, theoretical, and ultimately, sociological exploration of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as axes of inequality in the United States, while recognizing that these axes are also fundamental sources of identity and community. Materials examine the complex interaction between personal experiences and social structures as students explore how individuals carry varying degrees of penalty and privilege depending on their position along axes of racs, ethnicity, and gender in a complex matrix that affects everyone in society. Students will be invited to explore the ways that people experience and respond to the matrix, that is, structures of racial/ethnic, class, and gender differences, and the ways that people help to reinforce and reshape those structures.

3381  Exploring Social Inequality through Music & Film (3) Cross listed as GNDR 3381. Fulfills Diversity.
   During the election campaign for President Barack Obama, our forty fourth President and our first African American President, one of candidate Obama's famous campaign mantras were the words "Yes We Can!" Soon the catch-phrase, reminiscent of other calls to action such as "we shall overcome" and "si se puede" for underserved populations and populations of color in U.S. history facing issues of social inequality, became a popular music video released by hip-hop musician and raper Will.i.am. This wedding of issues of social inequality in U.S. politics and society with popular culture media such as music and film is the central focus of this course. Fundamentally, this course is a historical, theoretical, and ultimately, sociological exploration of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as axes of inequality in the United States, through the lens of music and film media. Materials examine the interaction between personal experiences and social structures as students explore how individuals carry varying degrees of penalty and privilege depending on their position within a complex matrix along axes of race, ethnicity, class, and gender that affects everyone in society. Students will be invited to explore the ways that people experience and respond to the matrix, that is, structures of racial/ethnic, class, and gender inequality, and the ways that people help to reinforce and reshape those structures.

3393  Diversity Internship (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's permission required.
   This course allows students to earn credit while gaining valuable experience working in the areas where issues play a significant role. Faculty advisors help students select an appropriate agency in which to serve.

3410  Special Topics in Globalization, Politics, and Society (3)

3433  Sociology of Organizations and Entrepreneurs (3)
   Organizations play a critical role in sorting and rewarding individuals within all countries. This course explores how these organizations emerge, how they operate, and how they change or resist change. The key questions addressed in the class are: What are the risks that new organizations face? Why do some organizations disappear, while others last? How do these processes differ across time and from place to place? The class provides not only theoretical toolkits to explore the emergence and persistence of organizations, but also an opportunity to develop a plan for a new organization.

3435  Sociology of Economic Development (3)
   This course addresses economic growth and development by looking into the causes and processes behind the development and underdevelopment of "newly industrialized countries" and "less-developed countries." Social and economic factors associated with growth and their effects on society are discussed with special attention to the state, social structure, the market, human and capital resources, international trade, and particularly, globalization.

3436  Global Social Structure and Change (3)
   Structure of the global system historically and in modern times. Relationships between world structure and national institutions and processes.

3440  Sociology of Religion (3) Cross listed as SOC 5440. Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Presents comparative and critical approaches to the understanding of religious institutions and practices. Analyzes religion and its impact upon societies, global-international events, and personal well-being. It emphasizes the diversity and nature of "religious experience" in terms of different groups, classes and individuals. Surveys Western, Eastern, New Age, and Native American religions, as well as unaffiliated groups in terms of their defining beliefs and practices. Explores religion in terms of social processes and phenomena that include, socialization, social control, social identity, authority, power, law, political behavior, stratification, culture, social change, deviance, and gender. The course contributes to an understanding of the functioning, and diversity or religion important to making more discerning decisions regarding cultural, political, and moral issues that are often influenced by religion.

3446  Political Sociology (3)
   Distribution of power in society, power relations in nation-states, electoral politics, social movements, and relationships between power and the state.

3480  Environmental Sociology (3)
   In this course we will take a social scientific approach to critically discuss and evaluate societal changes and their impact on local environmental conditions as well as the global ecosystem. We will primarily (but not exclusively) focus on structural issues in macro-comparative context since these are the professor's areas of expertise. Environmental sociology is a relatively diverse area that crosses trivial disciplinary boundaries-it would be impossible to introduce all its key theoretical perspectives and research agendas in one quarter. Thus, we will address some of the most salient macro-level human/environment topics in contemporary environmental degradation, contemporary theories in environmental sociology, systemic causes and social consequences of environmental disruption, collective responses to environmental disruption, global challenges to climate change policy, and the effects of globalization on environmental degradation (e.g. greenhouse gas emissions, deforestation, water pollution) and human well being (malnutrition, hunger, infant mortality). Indeed, we will see that the structural causes of environmental degradation and human suffering are often not mutually exclusive.

3485  Cities and Communities (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3111 or SOC 3112 or intructor's consent Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   Examines how cities and city life are shaped by social, cultural, political, and economic forces operating at many different levels. It also deals with how diverse groups of citizens in particular urban places relate to changes in their cities. The course also explores how different urban environments, such as different neighborhoods, influence the lives of city residents. Topics covered include the emergence of cities in different historical periods, spatial aspects of urban growth, urban power and politics, social diversity and inequality, and various issues currently confronting cities, such as residential segregation by race and class, deindustrialization, concentrated poverty, affordable housing, homelessness, sprawl, gentrification and urban renewal/displacement, and urbanization in low-income countries of the world.

3486  Comparative Environmental Sociology (3)
   In this course we will engage some of the most central topics in comparative environmental sociology. The course will include a balance of theoretical and empirical works on topics including the origins of environmetal sociology, transnational environmental justice research, competing perspectives on economic growth and the environment, international political economy and the environment, world society and the environment, structural human ecology, and the challenges of international environmental policy development and implementation. Students will critically evaluate important written works on these and other topics, and will conduct their own comparative research project on a topic of relevance to environmental sociology.

3510  Special Topics in Deviance, Crime & the Law (3)

3560  Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3)
   Sociologists of the past saw the study of deviance as the study of "nuts, sluts, and perverts." Contemporary sociologists have a more nuanced and critical perspective on the subject. This course is an historical, theoretical, and ultimately, sociological exploration of the field of deviant behavior, describing and analyzing particular forms of socially defined deviant behavior including murder, rape, prostitution, and illegal drug use, among other topics covered.

3561  Criminology (3)
   Who are you more likely to be victimized by-a stranger or someone known to you? How realistic are TV crime shows? These and other questions regarding crime, its context, and its causes will be answered in this class. Four major areas of criminology are explored: the history of criminology, theory of crime causation, typologies of crime, and crime prevention efforts. Specifically, students will be introduced to the nature and extent of crime, the criminal justice system, various theories explaining why crime occurs, different types of crimes, and recent efforts to deal with and prevent crime.

3562  Juvenile Delinquency (3)
   Are children today more violent than in the past? What are the current trends and patterns in the delinquency committed by juveniles today? Juvenile Delinquency explore the nature and extent of delinquency, various theories explaining why juvenile delinquency occurs, and different types of delinquency, as well as the state of and issues in the juvenile justice system. Overall, the goal of this course is to enable students to think sociologically and critically about issues related to juvenile delinquency.

3563  Good Cop, Bad Cop: Policing in the U.S. (3)
   Why are some cops corrupt and/or brutal? Is racial profiling a problem in the U.S? Has community policing been an effective policing policy? This course explores law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels. Students are introduced to the nature of policing, a history of policing in the United States, different types of law enforcement agencies, different roles of police in our society, how police respond to crime, problems in policing, and experiences of police officers.

3564  Criminal Courts and Corrections in the U.S. (3)
   Criminal courts and corrections are fundamental components of the U.S. criminal justice system. This course provides students with an overview of criminal courts and corrections. Topics covered include: history of U.S. courts and corrections, criminal responsibility, basis of law, structure of the courts and corrections, theories of punishment, and current issues in both the courts and corrections.

3565  Women and Crime (3) Cross listed as GNDR 3565.
   Historically, women have been excluded from the criminological discussion. This course examines women's experiences with crime and the criminal justice system. The course covers female offenders and their treatment by the criminal justice system, female victims of crime, and female employees of the agencies of the criminal justice system and their experiences. The goal of the course is to explore all aspects of women and crime and for the students to develop an understanding of these issues and why they are important.

3566  Society and the Criminal Mind (3)
   Interested in profiling? This course explores the etiology, development, and current practice of the criminal thinking approach. The course begins with a brief overview of sociological and criminological theory as it relates to the criminal thinking perspective. The origin of this approach will be trace through the works of early contributors to the criminal thinking perspective. Specific criminal thinking patterns and errors will be discussed. Specific topics covered include: the criminal thinking perspective, the criminal personality, behavioral thought patterns, psychopathic and sociopathic behavior, criminal profiling, and crime and the life course.

3567  White Collar Crime (3)
   An analysis of White Collar Crime: how it is defined, defended, prosecuted, and punished.

3568  Sociology of Law (3)
   A dominant theme among many sociologists, jurists, and philosophers is that a primary function of law is to bring about social change. To this end, sociology of law will be explored through both historic and modern perspectives. Sociological conditions that give rise to major legal developments will be explored through key appellate and supreme courts cases. An additional emphasis of the course will be to investigate what role sociology and other social sciences should play in the process of making new laws and abolishing obsolete ones. Specific topics covered include: the incarceration binge, the treatment of white collar criminals and sex offenders, reproductive freedom, and death row.

3569  Terrorism, Violence, and Aggression (3)
   As citizens of an increasingly complex and often terrifying world, we live with daily threats of terrorism, violence, and aggression to greater or lesser degrees. Students of sociology and criminology have long been concerned with these uneasy topics, and continue to pursue some understanding of perpetrators, conditions, societal structures, and political regimes that may encourage such hostility toward one's fellowman. This course will explore various aspects of these subjects as they relate primarily to contemporary life and society.

3593  Criminology Internship (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   This course allows students to earn credit while gaining valuable experience working in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. A variety of criminal justice agencies are available for student internships, including police agencies, juvenile detention centers, victim advocate programs, and criminal justice services.

3610  Special Topics in Population and Health (3)

3638  Sociology of Marriage and Family (3) Cross listed as GNDR 3638.
   This course addresses the institution of family in terms of the nature and functioning of family and the social context of family. It examines the diversity of families in the U.S. and other societies, conceptualizing the institution of family through a variety of sociological perspectives and theories. Research is presented that illuminated that nature of family and the ways in which families are influenced by social context and social change, and, in turn, the ways in which changes in family composition, roles, and relations influence society and social change. The changing nature of family and the relationship between family, ethnicity, and class are important subjects of study. Related topics include dating, marriage, cohabitation, divorce, childbearing, parenting, child development, family violence, love, intimacy, sexuality and aging.

3650  Population and Society (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3112 or FCS 3210 or ECON 3640 or PSY 3000 or an equivalent approved by the instructor. Fulfills IR & Quantitative Intensive & Reasoning.
   Causes of and trends in world population growth. Dynamics of population growth and structure on human society and environment. Policy implications and future prospects.

3653  Global Population Problems (3)
   This course explores the social psychological and social structural impacts of historical, contemporary, and projected global population problems at regional, national, and local levels. Lectures first introduce students to basic demographic models of fertility, mortality, and migration, and then quickly move on to investigate specific demographic-related problems in areas such as gender inequality, international migration, crime, public health, urbanization, poverty, and the human environment. Students learn how to utilize social demographic resources available on the internet at national population data centers in societies around the world to interactively develop a series of mini-research projects.

3671  Sociology of Health (3)
   This course introduces students to the field of medical sociology through lectures and discussions of major concepts, theories, and issues relating to the causes and consequences of health and illness. Three general areas are covered: the convergence of social science and medicine, health and illness behavior, and mainstream and alternative medical care. Examples of topics covered are conception of health, social stress and health, doctor-patient relationship, complementary and alternative medicine, and issues in the U.S. health care delivery system.

3673  Social Epidemiology (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3112 or FCS 3210 or ECON 3640 or PSY 3000 or an equivalent approved by the instructor. Fulfills Quan Reason (Stat/Logic) & Quant Intensive BS.
   What are the major public health problems in our country and across the globe today? How do illnesses spread so quickly across a population? Why is life expectancy higher in some countries than others? Can public health policies and medical technologies control or reduce the spread of illness? Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related outcomes in population. Epidemiology is also defined as the application of statistical analyses to the control of health problems and the formation of public health interventions. Students will use real-life data to explore how epidemiologists measure morbidity, mortality, and life expectancy across a population. They will examine the various types of research methods that epidemiologists use and discover how to statistically identify the risk factors or cause of a disease.

3741  Sociology of Migration: Global and Local Perspectives (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   An analysis of contemporary trends in internal and cross-border migrations. This course explores the initiation and maintenance of migration flows and the ways in which migration influences families, communities, and economies in origin and destination societies around the globe.

3769  Health Disparities: Race & Ethnicity (3) Fulfills Diversity.
   An examination of how race, ethnicity, and health intersect, exploring the nature of racial and ethnic categories, the patterns of United states demography, and the role of social environmental factors such as social class, racial and spatial segregation, healthcare inequalities, and systemic racism in contributing to racial and ethnic inequalities in health.

3877  Pre-Senior Thesis Seminar (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Students accepted into the Department's Senior Honors Thesis Program (SOC 4877 below) must enroll for this course in the Fall Semester prior to beginning work on the thesis under the supervision of a faculty tutor. See the full description of this program posted at the Department's website (www.soc.utah.edu).

3950  Individual Research (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Students identify a potential faculty tutor and obtain permission to initiate a research project of the student's own design or to participate in an already ongoing research project.

3951  Directed Reading (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Students identify a petential faculty tutor and obtain permission to jointly design a set of readings for the student in a sociology subfield. The content of the course is not to overlap in any significant manner with the content of the other established courses in the department or otherwise substitute for those courses.

3952  Individual Internships (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Practical experience in applying technical insights with faculty and other professionals in demonstration studies, evaluations, and projects in community and state agencies and in social-service settings.

3960  Special Topics (1 to 3)
   Topic to be specified when course is offered.

3965  Special Topics (1 to 3)
   This course makes available on a one-time basis classes or workshops on topics outside the established sociology curriculum.

4439  Contemporary Chinese Society (3)
   This course examines the global implications of China's modern development. Students will review the cultural roots of modern China, the history of social changes in the last century, and the challenges lying ahead of China and the world; the links between Chinese cultural and social traditions, contemporary institutions, and social life in the context of modernization and globalization; and social divisions such as male/female, urban/rural, and rich/poor and their influence in the domains of family, work, education and migration within the current process of drastic social change.

4693  Teaching Experience (1 to 3) Prerequisite: SOC 1010, at least two additional Sociology courses, Sociology Major status, and instructor's consent.
   This course provides Sociology majors with advanced, in-depth learning of a course's content materials and instructional logistics through special instructional projects and faculty-guided interaction with students enrolled in one of a select group of Socilogy courses. A list of Sociology faculty members participating in this training experience along with descriptions of typical student work assignments are available in the Sociology Undergraduate Advisor's Office. Prospective Students should consult first with the Advisor and then select a participating faculty member to obtain permission before registering for the course.

4877  Senior Thesis (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3877.
   This program is designed to provide an enriched research experience for Sociology majors. Students accepted into the program work toward the completion of an undergraduate-level thesis under the tutorial direction of a tenured or tenure-track faculty member. See the full description of this program posted at the Departments website (www.soc.utah.edu). Students must enroll in SOC 3877 Pre-Senior Thesis Seminar during the Fall semester with the approval of a faculty tutor and enroll in SOC 4877 Senior Thesis during Spring semester.

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Enrollment in this course is restricted to students in the University-level Honors Program who are working on an approved Honors thesis or project. Consult with the University Honors Program office for full details.

5120  Statistics I (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3112.
   Meets with SOC 6120. Technique of multiple regression; its application, models, extension, and interpretation.

5340  Seminar: Social Stratification (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3334.
   Meets with SOC 6340.

5436  Global Social Structure (3)
   Meets with SOC 6436.

5440  Sociology of Religion (3) Cross listed as SOC 3440. Fulfills Social/Behavioral Science Exploration.
   Presents comparative and critical approaches to the understanding of religious institutions and practices. Analyzes religion and its impact upon societies, global-international events, and personal well-being. It emphasizes the diversity and nature of "religious experience" in terms of different groups, classes and individuals. Surveys Western, Eastern, New Age, and Native American religions, as well as unaffiliated groups in terms of their defining beliefs and practices. Explores religion in terms of social processes and phenomena that include, socialization, social control, social identity, authority, power, law, political behavior, stratification, culture, social change, deviance, and gender. The course contributes to an understanding of the functioning, and diversity or religion important to making more discerning decisions regarding cultural, political, and moral issues that are often influenced by religion.

5657  World Populations Policies and Problems (3)
   This course provides a broad overview of global demography as a discipline within the social sciences and then focuses on selected contemporary population policies and problems that exist within and among various countries. Example of population problems that may be examined include the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, population and the environment, and policy responses to low fertility. The course is both globally and comparatively oriented and will give students the opportunity to become versed in population processes and problems that are being discussed on a global scale.

5720  Medical Sociology (3)
   Meets with SOC 6720.

5965  Special Topics (1 to 3)
   This course is designed to make available on a one-time basis courses or workshop on topics outside the existing Sociology curriculum.

5969  Special Topics in Statistics (1 to 6) Cross listed as OIS 5969, ED PS 5969, FP MD 5969, MATH 5969, ECON 5969, FCS 5969, PSY 5969, STAT 5969.
   Topics vary. Taught by members of the University Statistics Committee. Check current class schedule for cross-listings.

6010  Proseminar in Sociology (1)
   Introduction to current sociology faculty members, their substantive research interests, current projects, and research styles. Preparation of graduate students to participate as research assistants.

6050  Classical Sociological Theory (3)
   The development of sociological theory from the early 1800s to the mid-twentieth century: major ideas, concepts, and principles developed by early social theorists.

6110  Methods of Social Research (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3111 and SOC 3112 or equivalent
   Meets with SOC 5110. The logic of social research; methods of data collection; ethics in social research; problem formation, conceptualization, operationalization, reliability and validity, research design, and preparation or research proposals.

6115  Sociological Analysis (3)
   An intensive examination of a wide range of sociological studies, designed to acquaint students with how sociologists, using a variety of methods and data sources, handle important theoretical issues. Particular attention is given to the logical coherence of each study and the fit between data and interpretation.

6120  Statistics I (3)
   Technique of multiple regression; its application, models, extension, and interpretation.

6330  Comparative Organizational Analysis (3)
   Major sociological theories on comparative study of bureaucratic organizations. Works of Weber, Michels, Blau, Scott, Meyer, Perrow, Pugh, and Hickson. Dimensions of bureaucratic structure, effects of size and technology on organizational structure, organization-environment relationship, and cross-cultural analysis of bureaucracy.

6340  Social Stratification (3) Prerequisite: SOC 3334.
   Structure and changes in socio-economic inequalities. Status attainment in the United States in comparison with other societies. Advantages and burdens of social class, race, gender, and other factors considered from theoretical perspectives and available evidence.

6436  Global Social Structure (3)
   Meets with SOC 5436. Structure of the global system historically and in modern times. Relationships between world structure and national institutions and processes.

6439  Contemporary Chinese Society (3)
   This course examines the global implications of China's modern development. Students will review the cultural roots of modern China, the history of social changes in the last century, and the challenges lying ahead of China and the world; the links between Chinese cultural and social traditions, contemporary institutions, and social life in the context of modernization and globalization; and social divisions such as male/female, urban/rural, and rich/poor and their influence in the domains of family, work, education and migration within the current process of drastic social change.

6657  World Population Policies and Problems (3)
   This course provides a broad overview of global demography as a discipline within the social sciences and then focuses on selected contemporary population policies and problems that exist within and among various countries. Example of population problems that may be examined include the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, population and the environment, and policy responses to low fertility. The course is both globally and comparatively oriented and will give students the opportunity to become versed in population processes and problems that are being discussed on a global scale.

6693  Advanced Teaching Experience (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's permission required.
   This course provides graduate students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become successful teaching assistants and teachers. Students learn how to develop course curriculum, construct syllabi, and utilize various pedagogical methods. Students also learn about teacher and students responsibilities, as well as how to recognize and deal with sensitive issues such as sexual harassment , race/class/gender, and disabilities. Emphasis is on student participation. This course fulfills the teaching practicum requirement for the sociology graduate program.

6720  Medical Sociology (3)
   Important issues in medical sociology, including: contemporary medical sociological theory; research in social determinants of health and illness; illness behavior; doctor-patient interaction; and mainstream and alternative medical care.

6950  Individual Research: Master's (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

6951  Directed Reading: Master's (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

6965  Special Topics (1 to 3)
   This course is designed to make available on a one-time basis courses or workshops on topics outside the existing Sociology curriculum.

6977  Thesis Research: Master's (1 to 10) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

6988  Faculty Consultation: Master's (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

7050  Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)
   Sociological theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present: major ideas, analyses, and principles developed by modern social theorists.

7060  Seminar in Comparative International Sociology (3)
   This course examines social change in an increasingly interdependent world: theories of large scale social change; methods of macro-comparative analysis; globalization; comparisons of low-income and high-income countries. Examples of issues covered include: socioeconomic development, state formation, race/class/gender and "development", social and political conflict, social inequality, global relations/networks.

7070  Seminar in Population and Health (3)
   A core seminar in the population and health concentration, this course introduces students to demography as a field of study and the demographic perspective as a lens for examining societies and social change. Throughout the course, students will examine theories and empirical research that address mortality, fertility, family formation and migration behaviors, trends and differentials. Attention will also be focused on the societal impacts of population structure, composition, and change, as manifested in such issues as population aging, urbanization, and the intersection of population and the environment. Illustrations will be drawn from the United States and a variety of other countries, from developed and less developed regions, and from historical and contemporary contexts. The relevance of demographic behavior and population trends for public policy will be considered throughout the course.

7130  Statistics II (3) Prerequisite: SOC 6120.
   Techniques of data analysis, and when and how to apply techniques. Interpreting results in nonstatistical terms and applying computer packages such as SPSS. Techniques for data reduction, classification, and causal analysis (i.e., LISREL). Assumptions of the model and consequences when assumptions are violated.

7140  Longitudinal Data Analysis (3)
   This course introduces increasingly common statistical methods appropriate for conducting comparative international sociological research. The primary focus of the seminar is on the analysis of panel data (pooled cross-sectional time series), which involves repeated measures of an outcome over time on multiple units (e.g., countries). The course puts an emphasis on fundamental concepts and especially the successful application of such methods, with attention paid toward all stages of the analyses, beginning with the creation and organization of panel datasets and ending with the writing of empirically-focused manuscripts. Students will also learn how to read and assess published works in the social sciences that use these and related methods.

7800  Professional Development (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Instruction and practical experience in the skills needed to become a professional scholar and independent researcher. Requires attendance at and participation in the Department Colloquium Series and Department Professional Development Workshop Series.

7911  Comparative International Readings I (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral Readings for the First Qualifying Exam toward the Ph.D. taken two semesters prior to the First Qualifying Exam when the chosen area is Comparative International Studies.

7912  Qualifying Exam #1 Comparative International Readings II (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral program students prior to taking the qualifying exams. Seminal readings in Comparative International Sociology (contemporary).

7921  Qual Exam #1 Population and Health Readings I (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral program students prior to taking the qualifying exams. Seminal readings in Population and Health (classical).

7922  Qual Ex #1 Population and Health Readings Part II (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral program students prior to taking the qualifying exams. Seminal readings in Population and Health (contemporary).

7931  Qualifying Exam Area #2 I (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Students take an exam in an approved second area not covered in the first exam . Readings for the Second Qualifying Exam toward the Ph.D. taken TWO semesters prior to the Second Qualifying Exam.

7932  Qualifying Exam Area #2 II (1 to 6)
   Ph.D. students take an exam in an approved second area not covered in the first exam. Readings for the Second Qualifying Exam toward the Ph.D. taken ONE semester prior to the Second Qualifying Exam.

7941  Research Instruction I (1 to 9) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral program students prior to presenting the dissertation proposal. Instruction in and supervision of the development of the dissertation proposal.

7942  Research Instruction II (1 to 9) Prerequisite: Department consent required.
   Required for doctoral program students prior to presenting the dissertation proposal. Instruction in and supervision of the presentation (colloquium) of the dissertation proposal.

7950  Dissertation Proposal Development (1 to 9) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

7951  Directed Readings: Ph.D. (1 to 3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

7977  Dissertation Research: Ph.D. (1 to 12) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   The final requirement of a Doctoral Degree (Ph.D.). Taken prior to and during the semester of the oral defense. Repeatable for credit.

7988  Faculty Consultation: Ph.D. (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.


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