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University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2009
Posted Mar 02, 2009

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2009, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1100  History of Western Civilization to 1300 (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   First half of a two-semester course. A survey of society, culture, and institutional development in the ancient and early medieval world, from the Neolithic to 1300 A.D.

1110  History of Western Civilization Since 1300 (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Second half of a two-semester course. A survey of the evolution of western civilization from the Middle Ages (1300) to the 20th century.

1210  Asian Civilizations: Traditions (3) Cross listed as UGS 1210, ASTP 1210. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Offers students a critical understanding of Asian cultures and civilizations by familiarizing them with the fundamental ideas, values, and practices of traditional Asian civilizations as expressed in religion, philosophy, literature, art, and society. Students are expected to engage some of the core texts of Asian traditions, ranging from Confucian, Daoist, Hindu, and Buddhist classics to literary masterpieces, as well as to appreciate how religious and philosophical traditions have shaped differently and similarly the cultures and societies of different regions of Asia. Readings and assignments aim at fostering analytic, interpretive, and creative abilities, and at developing the oral and written communication skills of students.

1220  Asian Civilizations: Modern History and Societies (3) Cross listed as UGS 1220, ASTP 1220. Fulfills Soc/Beh Sci or Hum Exploration.
   Although faculty teaching this course focus on modern and contemporary Asian history, society, politics, and economics, they may vary the content matter and emphases according to their disciplinary interests. All instructors share in common an interest in fostering basic oral and written communication skills and developing analytical, methodological, and conceptual understanding and skills. Fulfills humanities or social science intellectual explorations requirement. Consult semester Class Schedule for the intellectual explorations area being offered.

1300  Latin American Civilization to the 1820s (3) Cross listed as UGS 1300. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   First half of two-semester course. This course introduces students to central themes in Latin American civilization from the time of the Columbian voyages to the movements for independence in the 1820s.

1310  Latin American Civilization Since the 1820s (3) Cross listed as UGS 1310. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Second half of two-semester course. This course introduces students to central themes in Latin American civilization from the movements for independence in the 1820s to the present.

1450  Middle Eastern Civilization: Imperial and Religious Past (3) Cross listed as MID E 1545, UGS 1450. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Students are introduced to the river valleys of Mesopotamia and Egypt, where agrarian-urban civilization began in c. 3500 BCE and to the factors responsible for the transition of the Middle East from hunting and gathering to irrigation farming. They will learn how the material, artistic, scholarly, and religious elements making up Middle Eastern civilization influenced each other and, as a whole, contributed to the formation of Western European civilization. Technology, science, architecture, and art of the Middle East, the poetry and prose and literature of some of its peoples, and the symbolism of prophetic revelation are examined, as are religious law and theological explanation in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The goal of this course is to help students reach an understanding of the depth of human civilization in its various forms and the lasting contributions these forms have made to our life today.

1460  Middle Eastern Civilization: Modern Period (3) Cross listed as MID E 1546, UGS 1460. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   A survey of the Mid-East from the mid-18th century to the present. Emphasis will be on interactions between social, political, and cultural groupings at several levels, from the central imperial state to local community entities.

1500  World History to 1500 (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Spans human origins and early civilizations to the emergence of universal civilizations by 1500 C.E.

1510  World History Since 1500 (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Themes in the historical development of the world's peoples and cultures since 1500.

1700  American Civilization (3) Fulfills American Institutions.
   Political, economic, and social development of American institutions and ideas. Satisfies the American Institutions requirement.

2100  Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Introduces students to the origins, process, and legacy of the Nazi Holocaust during World War II.

2200  Religion and Diversity in the U.S. (3) Fulfills Diversity.
   Explores the distinct beliefs, rituals, values, and social organization of religious communities and individuals in the United States.

2500  The Olympic Games: Ancient and Modern (3) Cross listed as UGS 2500. Fulfills Soc/Beh Sci or Hum Exploration.
   This course will discuss the origins and contexts of the Olympic Games, both in Antiquity and Modern times, in a series of topically linked themes. These will deal with the social, political, economic, and cultural aspects of the Games in order to put them into their historical contexts. The themes will include questions of amateur athletics and professionalism, international politics, commercialism and the games, gender, growing cultural awareness and values, as well as literature and art.

2600  Perspectives on Sports and American Society (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Considers both the popular fascination with and the academic investigation of sports in American society. Some philosophers and sociologists argue that sport has become, if not America's "secular religion," then certainly the one cultural activity that most effectively and pervasively overcomes distinctions of race, class, gender, and ethnicity, as well as politics and religion, to bind Americans in a community of shared values and aspirations. Students gain a deeper understanding of sport in American society and a greater appreciation of the essential unity of learning. Consult semester Class Schedule for the Intellectual Explorations area being offered.

2700  U.S. History to 1877 (3)
   The first half of a two-semester survey of American history, from colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction. History majors taking 2700 and 2710 fulfill the American Institutions requirement.

2710  U.S. History Since 1877 (3)
   The second half of a two-semester survey of American history, from the end of Reconstruction to the present.

3005  Ancient Empires (3) Cross listed as MID E 3500.
   Focuses on the Assyrian, Persian, and Babylonian empires from ca. 1000 B.C.E. to the conquest of Alexander the Great (ca. 300 B.C.E.).

3006  The Archaeology, History, & Culture of Ancient Persia (3) Cross listed as MID E 3506.
   Explores the archaeology, history, and culture of ancient Iran from Neolithic times to Alexander the Great. Examines development of Iranian civilization and effect that internal and external forces had on creation and proliferation of Persian culture. Special emphasis placed on Elamite civilization and its role in forming Mesopotamian civilization, the arrival of Indo-Europeans, Mede civilization, and Achaemenid Persian empire and Zoroastrianism.

3010  Classical Greece (3)
   Historical development of Greece and the Aegean Basin from the Bronze Age down to end of the Peloponnesian War.

3020  Age of Alexander (3)
   Historical development in the Eastern Mediterranean from the rise of Macedon to the coming of the Romans.

3030  The Byzantine Empire (3)
   Covers the history of the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire. This course will cover the cycles of decay and renewal which characterize the history of Byzantium through the Slavic invasions, the rise of Islam, the Crusades and the emergence of the Ottoman Empire.

3040  Early Medieval England (3)
   A survey of the political, social, and religious history of pre- and post-conquest England.

3050  History of Medieval Spain (3)
   Meets with HIST 5050 and MID E 5505. Focuses on the history, geography, culture, and religion of Spain until the end of the 15th century. Includes a survey of pre-Roman and Roman times, but emphasizes the Visigothic, Islamic, and Christian developments until the discovery of the New World. May be used for the Middle East major when taught by Middle East faculty.

3080  The Renaissance (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   This course examines European life in the era of the Renaissance, with a special focus on Italy. Topics include definitions of humanism, the rejuvenation of Greek and Roman classicism, urban life, court society, civic religion, gender and technological and artistic innovations.

3090  Reformations: Europe in Turmoil (3)
   This course will examine the profound religious, political, and cultural changes of the period between 1450 and 1650. These changes permanently transformed Europe and the broader world. Students will learn to assess both the causes and the nature of these events in order to appreciate their long-term effect on the course of European development and on western civilization.

3140  Victorian Britain (3)
   This course investigates some of the major themes in Victorian social and cultural history. It will use the analytical categories of gender, race, and class to explore social relationships and cultural developments from the Industrial Revolution to the end of the nineteenth century.

3150  Imperial Russia (3)
   Survey of Russian history from the 9th through the 19th century with an emphasis upon the transformation of state and society during the 1700s and 1800s.

3160  Soviet Union (3)
   Analysis of the political, economic, social, and cultural problems and policies which contributed to the death of Imperial Russia, the birth of the Soviet Union, and the collapse of communism in 1991.

3170  Revolutionary France: 1770-1871 (3)
   Political, social, cultural, and diplomatic history of France from the origins of the French Revolution to the establishment of the third Republic.

3180  Republican France: 1871-Present (3)
   Political, social, cultural, and diplomatic history of France from the establishment of the third Republic to the present.

3190  Modern Germany (3)
   History of the emergence of modern Germany from the era of the French Revolution through unification, two world wars, division and Cold War, and eventually reunification.

3200  Age of Imperialism (3)
   Modern Europe from the French and Industrial Revolutions to the First World War. Examines how modern Europe is shaped by the interaction of these two revolutions. Examines rise of modern politics and ideologies, social problems, European expansion, and the road to war.

3210  Age of Total War (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Examines the First and Second World Wars as one fundamental total conflict of the 20th century. Demonstrates modern war as an engine of social, political, economic, and cultural change. Close examination of the rise of fascism and communism.

3220  Post-war Europe: 1945-1991 (3)
   Examines the diplomatic, political, social, and cultural history of Europe from the end of World War II to the collapse of the Soviet Union.

3240  Twentieth Century Britain (3)
   This course investigates twentieth-century British history from the decline of Victorian values to the rise of New Labour. The twentieth century was a period of enormous change in Britain as it participated in two world wars, dealt with the economic and social effects of dismantling its empire, and witnessed radical shifts in gender, class and race relations. This course will explore the political, social, and cultural history of this dynamic period through the use of primary source texts and contemporary films.

3300  History of Mexico (3)
   Examines Mexican history from pre-conquest societies through the present, paying special attention to the following topics: colonial legacies, economic development, the Mexican Revolution (1910), U.S.-Mexican relations, the construction of racial and ethnic identities, and cultural traditions.

3390  Mesopotamian Civilizations (3) Cross listed as MID E 3539.
   History of the rise of civilization in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. The development of society, religion and culture will be covered from Prehistory down through the rise of the Persian Empire.

3392  Islamic Spain (3) Cross listed as MID E 3592, MID E 5592, HIST 5392.
   This course will cover the geographical region of the Iberian peninsula (equivalent to modern Spain and Portugal) and North Africa (modern Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco.) Within a basic framework of political history we will look at the economic, social and cultural evolution of the Jewish, Muslim and Christian communities of this region. We will branch out, when necessary, to West Africa, France, Italy and the Ottoman Empire.

3395  The Ottoman Empire (3) Cross listed as MID E 3595.
   Meets with HIST 5395 and MID E 5595. Introduces students to major topics of early modern Middle Eastern history. Covers such major topics as gunpowder and shipbuilding revolutions, transformation of world commerce, artistic and architectural creativity in Ottoman culture, the social and cultural significance of Topkapi Palace, popular religion, and provincial life in North Africa, the Balkans, Egypt, and Syria.

3400  Mid-E Since 1914: Imperialism, Nationalism, Revolution and War (3)  Cross listed as MID E 3540.
   Meets with MID E 5540. Covers World War I to the present. Includes discussions of colonialism, nationalism, liberation movements, oil dependency, economic development, and religious revival. The goal is for students to understand the background of the tensions between the Middle East and the West.

3410 The Contemporary Middle East: Crises and Revolutions (3) Cross listed as MID E 3410.
   Introduces students to the principle standing contemporary crises in the Middle East, as well as to some important intellectual debates. A series of topics will be examined over each two week period. Students should gain a great understanding of the major issues preoccupying the people and states of the Middle East. In addition, every effort will be made to demystify the region, and to emphasize that no particular exceptionalism sets it apart from the rest of the developing world.

3450  Modern Africa to 1914 (3)
   Patterns of African history since the mid-19th century up to 1914 in four Subsaharan regions. Comparisons between these regions will follow a general order of chronological "eras," with exploration of a set number of analytical themes: traditional leadership and elites, social groupings, religion, and economic patterns.

3500  Pre-modern China (3)
   Covers the political, social, economic, and cultural history of China from earliest times to the 15th century.

3510  Modern China (3)
   A survey of modern Chinese history, from the 15th century to the present.

3520  Pre-modern Japan (3)
   A survey of Japanese state and society from its early origins to the mid-19th century.

3530  Modern Japan (3)
   A survey of Japan's political and cultural history from the mid-19th century to the present.

3550  India: Empire and Religion (3)
   Surveys the history of India from the beginning of the archeological record (ca.2000 B.C.) through the decline of the Mughal Empire (ca.1700). The major forcus is on state formation and dynastic contributions to the subcontinent. The birth of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism and the spread of Islam will also be examined.

3560  Modern India (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   The history of India since 1600. Major themes in social, political, and cultural history from the time of the Mughal Empire to the rise and fall of the British Empire. Emphasis on Gandhi and nationalism, and the emergence of India and Pakistan as independent nations in the 20th century.

3565  Mughals to Modernity (4)
   This course is only for students going on the study abroad program to India. The course examines South Asia and India's history from the Mughal period (16-17th c.) through its colonial era (18-19th c.) to the present "modern" period. Much of the Mughal and colonial influence on India is still visible in architecture as well as social institutions. The course will offer background context, and then during the spring recess (plus one week) will travel to India. Once there, we will visit Delhi, Agra, and other cities and villages.

3570  History of Korea (3)
   This course surveys the political, economic, social and cultural history of Korea from prehistoric times through the twentieth century. It emphasizes the distinctive features of Korean history within the broader context of East Asian history.

3700  Colonial America (3)
   Considers the major topics and themes in early American history, from the earliest English Colonies until the Seven Years' War.

3710  The American Revolution (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Examines the origins, progress, and effects of the American Revolution, with a focus on the central political and social themes of the period.

3720  The New Nation: 1789-1848 (3)
   Examines the history of the United States from the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through the end of the Mexican War.

3730  Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
   Examines the history of the United States during the Civil War and Reconstruction era.

3740  Emergence of Modern America (3)
   A survey of U.S. history from the Gilded Age in the late 19th century through the Progressive Era, WWI, the 1920s, the Great Depression and the New Deal, down to WWII.

3750  Recent America (3)
   A survey of U.S. history from the Second World War to the present, encompassing postwar America, the Cold War, McCarthyism, Vietnam, the civil rights revolution, and American politics from Truman to Clinton.

3910  Special Studies (1 to 3)
   Topical/thematic course. Variable content.

4000  Archaeology as History (3)
   Meets with HIST 6000. The purpose of this course is to give historians a basic understanding of the archaeological record and in doing so enable them to use archaeological data for research. The course begins with an overview of archaeological method and theory. After this introduction to the fundamentals of archaeology it focuses on interpretation, addressing such questions as how archaeological data can be used both to reconstruct the past and to build historical models.

4005  Ancient Israel and Palestine (3) Cross listed as MID E 4500.
   Provides an historical overview of the archaeology of ancient Israel from the Neolithic Period to the Roman Period.

4010  Roman Republic (3)
   Topics covering Roman historical development from prehistory down to the assassination of Caesar.

4020  Roman Empire (3)
   Topics covering Roman historical development from fall of the Republic to the collapse of the western provinces of the Roman Empire.

4030  Age of Attila the Hun (3)
   Meets with HIST 6030. This course examines pre- and post-migratory barbarian tribes and their impact on early medieval Europe.

4040  Christianity in the Ancient World (3)
   Meets with HIST 6040. history of the early Christian church in its relations to society from the beginnings to the end of the Roman world.

4050  Christianity in the Medieval World (3)
   Meets with HIST 6050. A history of the medieval Christian church from the end of the Roman world to the end of the Middle Ages.

4085  History of Technology (3)
   Meets with HIST 6085. This course introduces students to the study of the nature, development, role, and significance of technology as a dynamic element in human society. We begin with some consideration of technology in the broad sweep of human history and of the philosophy of technology. We next examine the so-called, scientific revolution: race, gender, and class formation surrounding the industrial revolution; the triumphs, horrors, and profound discontents of twentieth-century technological modernity.

4090  Perspectives on World Health (3)
   Medical and health issues in the history of selected world cultures and nations.

4095  The Body and State in Modern Britain (3)
   Meets with HIST 6095. Explore the relationship between the bodies of different types of citizens and the British state. It begins with the 1832 British Anatomy Act, which allowed for dissection of the poor, and ends with the establishment of the National Health Service in 1948. Paying close attention to issues of gender, sexuality, class, race, and ethnicity, this course examines both governmental policies for managing, disciplining, and providing for the bodies of citizens, and the reaction of the public to these methods.

4105  Medieval Christian Traditions in Practice (3)
   Examines the changing nature of Christian ritual and behavioral practices from the first century C.E. to present day.

4120  Christianity in the Modern World (3)
   Surveys the major trends in Christian history since 1800.

4125  Information Technology in the Rennaissance (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Meets with HIST 6125. An introduction to the history of the printing press, the book, and the development of mass communication in Renaissance Europe.

4130  Early Medieval Social and Culture (3)
   Meets with HIST 6130. The intellectual, social, and cultural aspects of the formation of Europe to about 1050 A.D.: Christianity and Classical Culture; late Roman, Germanic, and Celtic societies; Christendom and the conversion of the north.

4140  Late Medieval Social and Culture (3)
   Meets with HIST 6140. The intellectual, social, and cultural aspects of the various European societies from about 1050 A.D. to about 1300 A.D.: Peasants, towns, religion, art and architecture, universities.

4150  Modern London 1800-2000 (3)
   Meets with HIST 6150. Investigates the rise of London as a cosmopolitan urban centre in the 19th and 20th centuries. Explores the city as a dynamic residential, commercial, and tourist space and examines the way London became divided along class, gender, and ethnic lines. Investigates themes such as crime and policing, shopping and entertainment, imperial tourism, and development of street-based youth culture.

4200  Topics in World History (3) Cross listed as UGS 4200.
   Meets with HIST 6200. Focuses on key topics in world history such as migration, nationalism, and revolutions. Themes depend on instructors.

4250  Topics in European Social and Cultural History (3)
   Content varies.

4270  Empire and Exploration 1400-1750 (3)
   This 4000 level course will use travel to explore some of the central themes running through recent scholarship on early modern European history. These themes include those of spirituality and the missionary experience, economic expansion, changing intellectual traditions and cultural interaction and exchange.

4271  European Exploration, Imperialism, and Decolonization 1750 to Present (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   Meets with HIST 6271. Covers different forms of contact between Europe and the rest of the world from 1750 to the present. Acquaints students with the history of exploration of the Pacific and Africa, creation of European empires in the 19th century, and independence movements in those colonies during the 20th century. It places European history in global context, examining the impact of encounters abroad on European politics, economics and social history, and culture.

4280  Sex and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 1300-1700 (3) Cross listed as GNDR 4280.
   This 4000 level course will examine early modern European society through the filter of gender. Students taking this course will be expected to examine such issues as the exercise of political power, status and gender, sexuality, urban and rural economic roles, gender and spirituality, mobility and education.

4290  The Americas after Columbus (3)
   Meets with HIST 6290. Examines patterns of cross-cultural influence among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans in a variety of colonial settings throughout the early Americas.

4300  Topics in Latin American History (3)
   Concerns a specific topic in Latin American history. Content will vary each semester.

4310  Gender and Power in Latin America (3) Cross listed as GNDR 5755.
   Explores the question of the interplay between gender, power, and the creation of identities in Latin America. Examines how gender relations are socially constructed, maintained, and challenged. Examines the economic and cultural phenomenon which define women's roles in the region. Also considers the relationship between the status of women and their means of fighting for social justice, including instigating change in the status of women.

4320  America at War 1620-1898 (3)
   The course will open with a discussion of European-Indigenous warfare in the seventeenth century and then shift to the European driven conflicts in the eighteenth century. The second half of the course will cover the Revolutionary War, the periodic wars with Indigenous peoples, the Civil War and the Spanish-American wars. As important, the course will also deal with the institutional dimension of the military from administration to military academies.

4321  America at War 1898-1991 (3)
   Meets with HIST 6321. This course examines U.S. military history at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of war, and the impact of war on American society during the 20th century. Students will be required to master the analytic frameworks of two critical military theorists: Carl Von Clausewitz (the "Remarkable Trinity") and Mao Tse-Tung (Revolutionary Protracted War).

4330  Gender and War (3)
   Meets with HIST 6330 and GNDR 5765. This course explores the historical relationship between war and gender during the twentieth century. It employs transnational and comparative methodologies, focusing on U.S. history as well as that of other nations.

4340  Sport in American History (3)
   A survey of sport as a social and cultural institution from the folk games of the colonial era to the commercialized spectator sports of the 20th century. The class examines the institution of sport as well as how sport has both reflected and affected larger ethnic, economic, racial, and gender issues in American society.

4370  History of American Social Movements (3)
   Analyses the history of American social movements to understand how they are founded, who joins, and the variables in success of social movement activism.

4380  U.S. Environmental History (3) Cross listed as ENVST 4380.
   Meets with HIST 6380. Takes up major themes in human interactions with the North American/U.S. environment from the colonial period to the present. Major topics include: changing subsistence systems; political and religious interpretations of nature; the cultural subjectivity of scientific understandings of nature, and the rise of environmental movements.

4390  Major Issues in American History (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Selected topics course that critically analyzes key trends, conflicts, events, or problems in the history of the United States. Particular attention paid to cultural, political, and social history.

4400  Introduction to Islam (3) Cross listed as MID E 4510, POLS 4400. Fulfills International Requirement.
   Islam is the faith of over a billion followers. Most Muslims live in Indonesia, India, and Pakistan; the majority of Middle Easterners and many Africans are Muslims. The strong political engagement of the United States in the contemporary Middle East has made familiarity with Islam an urgent contemporary issue. This course will introduce students to Islam in its many forms, and help them to gain a better understanding of this world religion in its contemporary transnational and international dimensions.

4410  Arabian Days: The Islamic Caliphates (3) Cross listed as MID E 4541.
   Meets with MID E 6541 and HIST 6410. Arabian Nights is the most famous piece of literacy fiction in Islamic civilization. "Arabian Days" is a course that will focus on this civilization during its formative and mature periods (700-1259 C.E.). During these periods, Muslims shaped their religion, science, arts, architecture, and literature which will be investigated in this course.

4420  The Crusades (3) Cross listed as MID E 4542. Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Meets with HIST 6420 and MID E 6542. Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and its role in Middle Eastern society and economy, 1100-1300 CE.

4430  The Middle East: Nation-States (3) Cross listed as MID E 4543.
   Meets with HIST 6430 and MID E 6543. In-depth study of the recent history of individually selected Middle East countries. Examples: Egypt, Turkey, Iran, Algeria, and Lebanon.

4440  British and French Colonialism in the Middle East (3) Cross listed as MID E 4544.
   Meets with HIST 6440 and MID E 6544. An examination of the nature and process of British and French colonial activity in North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and Qajar Iran and their successor states in the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries.

4490  Major Issues in Middle Eastern History (3) Cross listed as MID E 4549.
   Meets with HIST 6490 and MID E 6549. Selected regional topics of contemporary political/economic interest. Examples: Palestine mandate, Arab/Israeli conflict, oil in the Middle East.

4500  The Urban Social History of the Arab Middle East: ca. 1750-1939 (3) Cross listed as MID E 4550.
   Meets with HIST 6500 and MID E 6550. Surveys various aspects of socio-economic and political life in the major cities of the Arab Middle East, with special (but not exclusive) reference to Aleppo, Damascus, and Cairo. Topics will include sources for urban social history and the kinds of use that can be made of them; urban institutions; family histories; the growth of extra-urban land-holding; demographic and social change.

4510  Asia in the World (3)
   Meets with HIST 6510. A course on Asian history with thematic relevance for World History. Topics vary according to instructor.

4520  Introduction to Asia: The Age of Globalization (3)
   Overview of the economic, political, cultural and social history of modern Asia, including China, Japan, India, Korea and Vietnam, from the 18th through 20th centuries. Through lectures and discussions, we will explore the major themes of Asia's role in the early modern world economy, the effects of Western imperialism on Asian societies, the rise of nationalism and anti-colonial movements, the emergence of distinctive Asian modernities influenced by the West yet critical of it, and the political crises that followed the Second World War.

4530  Women in Asia (3)
   Meets with HIST 6530. A course examining the history of women, gender relations, and ideas about gender in East, South and/or Southeast Asia. Geographic extent of coverage and time frame may vary according to instructor.

4540  Chicana/o History Since 1849 (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 4540. Fulfills Diversity.
   This course examines the historical experiences in the United States of people of Mexican background from the period of the Spanish frontier to present day. Using both primary and secondary sources, film and literature, this course will address themes such as the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848, the economic, political and social relationship between Mexicans and Anglo-Americans after the conquest of the southwest, Mexican women, the Chicano movement, and Chicana feminism. This class will not only provide an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic contributions of Chicano/as with particular attention to the ways in which race, class and gender have shaped their experiences, but also will explore the challenges in discovering Chicano voices in history, and approaches and methodologies scholars have utilized in studying the multifaceted history of Chicano communities.

4550  Latinos in the United States (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 4550.
   This course is a survey of the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping the lives of Latinas and Latinos in the United States from 1540 to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the history of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Cuban and New Latino Immigrant communities.

4560  Asian American History (3)
   A survey of Asian American history from the 19th century to the present.

4570  Constitutional History of the United States (3)
   Emphasis is placed on the origins of the Constitution, as well as the Marshall, laissez-faire, New Deal, and Warren eras. A modified Socratic method is used.

4600  Women in American History to 1870 (3) Cross listed as GNDR 4600. Fulfills Diversity.
   Broad overview of white, African-American, Native American, and Hispanic women in colonial, early Republican, and Victorian periods of American history. Women's work and family life in the New World, struggles of slave women, experience of women workers in Lowell textile mills, 19th-century cult of domesticity, legacy of westward expansion for Hispanic, Native American, and white women, and origins of first American women's rights movement.

4610  Women in American History Since 1870 (3) Cross listed as GNDR 4610. Fulfills Diversity.
   Struggle for women's entrance into colleges and professions; lives of Black, Native American, Hispanic, and immigrant women; women's suffrage movement; 1920s revolt against Victorian passionlessness; transformation of women's wage-work; domestic life of women in 1950s, and rebirth of modern feminism in 1970s.

4620  Topics in Gender History (3) Cross listed as GNDR 4620.
   Variable content course.

4630  History of Sexuality in America (3) Cross listed as GNDR 4630.
   Examines how Americans understand sexuality, sexual identity and their role in culture and politics, starting from early European ideas, shifting to those of native Americans, then examining changing formulations in the 19th and 20th centuries.

4640  America in Global Perspective (3)
   Course places America in a broad comparative and global perspective by focusing on themes that cut across national boundaries such as slavery and industrialization.

4650  History of the US West (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Themes in the history of the American West.

4660  History of Utah (3)
   A study of selected themes or problems in Utah's historical development. A chronological outline of important aspects of Utah history will be provided through assignment of a basic text.

4670  History of Native American Peoples (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 4670. Fulfills Diversity.
   This survey examines Native American history from the earliest records to the present. It focuses on Indian responses to European colonization and the consequent political, social, economic and cultural transformation of Native American Societies.

4680  Living in the Material World: American Material Culture Studies (3)
   Introduces students to the methods and principal scholarly concerns of material culture studies, the study of artifacts in relation to past human behavior, through readings, class discussion, and a series of writing exercises. Emphasis is on American material culture of the 19th and 20th centuries.

4690  African American History: 1619-1890 (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 4690. Fulfills Diversity.
   Addresses the African background of contemporary African Americans and analyzes the emergence of African American culture. Also describes the evolution of slavery and the dilemma slavery posed to the American Revolution generation. Other subjects include Blacks in slavery, the role of Blacks in the quest for freedom, the growth of pre-Civil War northern Black communities, the Civil War and Reconstruction Era.

4700  African American History Since 1890 (3) Cross listed as ETHNC 4700.
   Examines the emergence of segregation, the alternative strategies advanced by Ida B. Wells, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. DuBois, the 20th-century Great Migration, and the subsequent urban political/sociocultural movements of the 1910s and 1930s, World War II, the rise of militancy as manifested in Black Power, the state of inter- and intra-race relations since the 1970s.

4701  The Darwinian Revolution (3)
   Considers Darwin's thought and "Darwinism" with a focus on Britain and the United States.

4710  The Concept of Race in America (3) Fulfills Diversity.
   Considers the concept of race from the angle of intellectual history.

4722  American Intellectual History from the Revolution to World War I (3)
   Considers major topics in American intellectual history from the Enlightenment to socialism and progressivism on the eve of WWI.

4740  Economic History of the United States (3)
   Emphasis will be placed on economic growth, rising inequality, gender conflicts, the impact of war, growing debt, and economic crisis -- all in the context of the international community.

4750  U.S. Foreign Relations: Colonial Era to 1898 (3)
   Meets with HIST 6750. Explores the early history of the United States foreign relations, from the era of colonization to the Spanish-American War of 1898. Covers the rise of the United States as a world power, the impact of domestic developments on foreign relations, the significance of economic and financial developments, and evolving conceptions of sovereignty, nationality, and citizenship.

4760  U.S. Foreign Relations: Twentieth Century (3)
   Major American foreign policies, including involvement in wars from 1914 to 1995. Discussion of role of the presidency, congress, public opinion, and the economy.

4765  The Vietnam War (3)
   Meets with HIST 6765. This course traces the history of the Vietnam War from its origins at the end of World War II to the reconciliation of Vietnam and the United States in the 1990s. Diplomatic and military developments will be examined in the context of the social, economic, and political history of North and South Vietnam and the United States, and the war will be viewed from the perspective of both sides.

4770  Warfare in the Modern World (3)
   Focuses on war and war-making institutions over the past 600 years in a European and non-European context. (Time-frame varies)

4780  The Korean War (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   The Korean War course approaches the conflict from an international perspective. it considers Korea's position at the center of international rivalry in the early twentieth-century. As central, Korea is placed in the center of Asian wars that raged from the late 1940s into the 1970s. The course examines the conduct of the war as an international effort involving the multiple powers and the United Nations. Last, the course will end by looking at the impact of the war on Cold War and the arms race of the 1950s and 1960s.

4790  American Religions (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration and Diversity.
   Meets with HIST 6790. Surveys the major faiths found in the United States - Protestantism, Catholicism, Native American traditions, Judaism - and examines their relationship to American culture. Focuses on the period between 1870 and the present.

4820  Pacific Histories: Encounter, Colonialism, Transformation (3)
   Meets with 6820. Examines the history and consequences of European and American colonialism in the Pacific region from the late 18th century to the present. Focuses on developments on the Pacific coasts of America, the Pacific Islands, Australia, and New Zealand. Topics include Polynesian/European discourses about the Pacific as the new "New World", missionaries and religious transformations, gender relations and the colonial process, cross-cultural trade, and European anthropology and Pacific peoples.

4830  Decolonization and Postcolonialism, 1945-Present (3)
   This course traces the process of withdrawal by Great Britain and France from their colonies in Asia and Africa, beginning in 1947. It discusses the heavy-industrialization and centralized education schemes which nationalist elites adopted in their countries after gaining independence. The course concludes with an analysis of postcolonialism, a form of criticism which blames colonialism for the economic and social difficulties encountered today in Asia an Africa.

4840  Global Environmental History (3)
   Environmental history lends itself to comparative, transnational, and global themes. This course takes advantage of the rapidly accumulating literature from case studies around the world to explore nature's role in human affairs from pre-history to present.

4850  The Indian Disapora in Historical Perspective (3) Fulfills International Requirement.
   This course examines the Indian and South Asian global diaspora. Indians have left their homeland and settled elsewhere in the world since the 10th century. Currently, Indian and South Asian communities can be found in every nation, and in the US and Canada, they are among the most successful ethnic communities. How have Indians made their way from South Asia elsewhere? What was the role of colonialism in their dispersion? What is their relationship to their host communities and new homes.

4855  Environmental History of India (3)
   Meets with HIST 6855. This course examines India and South Asia's Environmental history from the ancient Harappan civilization (ca. 2500BC) to the present. The region's natural diversity spans from Himalayan snowcaps to tropical forests, from arid deserts to lush jungles. Intersecting this natural world, South Asia has been home to a wide variety of political bodies, from great indigenous empires (like that of the Maurayas, Guptas and Vijayanagar) to European colonial powers led by Portuguese, Dutch French and British forces.

4860  Environmental History of China (3)
   Meets with HIST 6860. Overview of the history of China's environment beginning with the philosophical foundations for thinking about nature and human interaction with the environment and then covering changes in the environment, shifting policies, and approaches to environmental problems from medieval times through the present.

4865  Gender, Race, and Empire in Asia (3)
   Meets with HIST 6865. Examines how ideas about gender and race shaped and were shaped by colonialism and anti-colonial nationalism in Asia from the 18th through 20th centuries. It covers the Chinese Qing Empire, British India, Dutch Indonesia, the Japanese empire, and the U.S. colony of the Philippines.

4920  Directed Reading (1 to 3)

4950  Undergraduate Research (1 to 3)
   Topic and research opportunities vary by professor.

4990  Senior Seminar (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   Required for history majors and teaching majors and minors. Topics will vary according to instructor.

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

5010  Special Studies: Greek History (3)
   Graduate studies course to be used in conjunction with HIST 3010 and History 3020.

5050  Medieval Spain (3)
   Meets with HIST 3050 and MID E 3505. Graduate students held to higher standards and/or additional work. May be used for the Middle East major when taught by Middle East faculty.

5080  American History and Its Publics (3)
   An introduction to the practice of public history. Students will also consider the complex relationship of Americans to their own history, especially as that relationship is performed through such media as museums and historic sites, film, and websites.

5090  Methods and Topics in Material Culture Studies (3)
   This colloquium considers current debates in material culture studies, with a particular emphasis on the study of North American material culture. Topical emphases may change from year to year.

5100  Internship in Public History (3)

5110  Archeological Field School (3) Cross listed as MID E 5511.
   Students participate in the Upper Tigris Archeological Research Project (UTARP) in SE Turkey to gain hands-on training in archeological field methods.

5340  Teaching History (3)
   Takes a practical approach to teaching history and social studies at the secondary level. Emphasis is not on education theory, but utilizes successful experiences of practicing teachers in the Salt Lake Valley. The primary goal is to introduce prospective teachers to a variety of specific, concrete teaching methods and techniques.

5392  Islamic Spain (3) Cross listed as MID E 3592, MID E 5592, HIST 3392.
   This course will cover the geographical region of the Iberian peninsula (equivalent to modern Spain and Portugal) and North Africa (modern Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco.) Within a basic framework of political history we will look at the economic, social and cultural evolution of the Jewish, Muslim and Christian communities of this region. We will branch out, when necessary, to West Africa, France, Italy and the Ottoman Empire.

5395  The Ottoman Empire (3) Cross listed as MID E 5595.
   Meets with HIST 3395 and MID E 3595. Introduces students to major topics of early modern Middle Eastern history. Covers such major topics as gunpowder and shipbuilding revolutions, transformation of world commerce, artistic and architectural creativity in Ottoman culture, the social and cultural significance of Topkapi Palace, popular religion, and provincial life in North Africa, the Balkans, Egypt, and Syria.

5900  Independent Research Study (1 to 3)

5910  Special Studies (1 to 3)
   Graduate courses.

6000  Archaeology as History (3)
   Meets with HIST 4000. The purpose of this course is to give historians a basic understanding of the archaeological record and in doing so enable them to use archaeological data for research. The course begins with an overview of archaeological method and theory. After this introduction to the fundamentals of archaeology it focuses on interpretation, addressing such questions as how archaeological data can be used both to reconstruct the past and to build historical models.

6010  Special Studies: Roman History (3)
   Graduate studies course to be used in conjunction with any one of the upper-division undergraduate course offerings in ancient history. Supplementary readings, discussion, and extended paper required.

6030  Age of Attila the Hun (3)
   Meets with HIST 4030. This course examines pre- and post-migratory barbarian tribes and their impact on early medieval Europe.

6040  Christianity in the Ancient World (3)
   Meets with HIST 4040. A history of the early Christian church in its relations to society from the beginnings to the end of the Roman world.

6050  Christianity in the Medieval World (3)
   Meets with HIST 4050. A history of the medieval Christian church from the end of the Roman world to the end of the Middle Ages.

6085  History of Technology (3)
   Meets with HIST 4085. This course introduces students to the study of the nature, development, role, and significance of technology as a dynamic element in human society. We begin with some consideration of technology in the broad sweep of human history and of the philosophy of technology. We next examine the so-called, scientific revolution: race, gender, and class formation surrounding the industrial revolution; the triumphs, horrors, and profound discontents of twentieth-century technological modernity.

6095  The Body and State in Modern Britain (3)
   Meets with HIST 4095. Explore the relationship between the bodies of different types of citizens and the British state. It begins with the 1832 British Anatomy Act, which allowed for dissection of the poor, and ends with the establishment of the National Health Service in 1948. Paying close attention to issues of gender, sexuality, class, race, and ethnicity, this course examines both governmental policies for managing, disciplining, and providing for the bodies of citizens, and the reaction of the public to these methods.

6125  Information Technology in the Renaissance (3)
   Meets with HIST 4125. An introduction to the history of the printing press, the book, and the development of mass communication in Renaissance Europe.

6130  Early Medieval Social and Cultural History (3)
   Meets with HIST 4130. The intellectual, social, and cultural aspects of the formation of Europe to about 1050 A.D.: Christianity and Classical Culture; late Roman, Germanic, and Celtic societies; Christendom and the conversion of the north.

6140  Late Medieval Social and Cultural History (3)
   Meets with HIST 4140. The intellectual, social, and cultural aspects of the various European societies from about 1050 A.D. to about 1300 A.D.: Peasants, towns, religion, art and architecture, universities.

6150  Modern London 1800-2000 (3)
   Meets with HIST 4150. Investigates the rise of London as a cosmopolitan urban centre in the 19th and 20th centuries. Explores the city as a dynamic residential, commercial, and tourist space and examines the way London became divided along class, gender, and ethnic lines. Investigates themes such as crime and policing, shopping and entertainment, imperial tourism, and development of street-based youth culture.

6200  Topics in World History (3)
   Meets with HIST 4200. Focuses on key topics in world history such as migration, nationalism, and revolutions. Themes depend on instructors.

6271  European Exploration, Imperialism, and Decolonization 1750 to Present (3)
   Meets with HIST 4271. Covers different forms of contact between Europe and the rest of the world from 1750 to the present. Acquaints students with the history of exploration of the Pacific and Africa, creation of European empires in the 19th century, and independence movements in those colonies during the 20th century. It places European history in global context, examining the impact of encounters abroad on European politics, economics and social history, and culture.

6290  The Americas after Columbus (3)
   Meets with HIST 4290. This course examines patterns of cross-cultural influence among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans in a variety of colonial settings throughout the early Americas.

6320  America at War 1620-1898 (3)
   The course will open with a discussion of European-Indigenous warfare in the seventeenth century and then shift to the European driven conflicts in the eighteenth century. The second half of the course will cover the Revolutionary War, the periodic wars with Indigenous peoples, the Civil War and the Spanish-American wars. As important, the course will also deal with the institutional dimension of the military from administration to military academies.

6321  America at War 1898-1991 (3)
   Meets with HIST 4321. This course examines U.S. military history at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of war, and the impact of war on American society during the 20th century. Students will be required to master the analytic frameworks of two critical military theorists: Carl Von Clausewitz (the "Remarkable Trinity") and Mao Tse-Tung (Revolutionary Protracted War).

6330  Gender and War (3)
   Meets with HIST 4330 and GNDR 5765. This course explores the historical relationship between war and gender during the twentieth century. It employs transnational and comparative methodologies, focusing on U.S. history as well as that of other nations.

6380  U.S. Environmental History (3)
   Meets with HIST 4380. This graduate course is designed to meet with its undergraduate equivalent, HIST 4380. This graduate course has correspondingly more work than the undergraduate course, to include more reading, more writing, in addition to a separate biweekly discussion meeting with graduate students and instructor.

6410  Arabian Days: The Islamic Caliphates (3) Cross listed as MID E 6541.
   Meets with HIST 4410 and MID E 4541. Arabian Days is the most famous piece of literary fiction in Islamic civilization. "Arabian Nights" is a course that will focus on this civilization during its formative and mature periods (700-1259 C.E.) During these periods, Muslims shaped their religion, science, arts, architecture, and literature which will be investigated in this course.

6420  The Crusades (3) Cross listed as MID E 6542.
   Meets with HIST 4420 and MID E 4542. Additional work required of graduate students. Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and its role in Middle Eastern society and economy, 1100-1300 CE.

6430  The Middle East: Nation-States (3) Cross listed as MID E 6543.
   Meets with HIST 4430 and MID E 4543. In-depth study of the recent history of individually selected Middle East countries. Examples: Egypt, Turkey, Iran, Algeria, and Lebanon.

6440  British and French Colonialism in the Middle East (3) Cross listed as MID E 6544.
   Meets with HIST 4440. An examination of the nature and process of British and French colonial activity in North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and Qajar Iran and their successor states in the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries.

6490  Major Issues in Middle Eastern History (3) Cross listed as MID E 6549.
   Meets with HIST 4490 and MID E 4549. Additional work required of graduate students. Islamic movements, Arab-Israeli conflict, Iranian Revolution, or other 20th century issues.

6500  The Urban Social History of the Arab Middle East: ca. 1750-1939 (3) Cross listed as MID E 6550.
   Meets with HIST 4500 and MID E 4550. Additional work required of graduate students. Surveys various aspects of socio-economic and political life in the major cities of the Arab Middle East, with special (but not exclusive) reference to Aleppo, Damascus, and Cairo. Topics will include sources for urban social history and the kinds of use that can be made of them; urban institutions; family histories; the growth of extra-urban land-holding; demographic and social change. A general familiarity with the history of the area in the 18th-20th centuries will be assumed.

6510  Asia in the World (3)
   Meets with HIST 4510. Additional work is required of graduate students. A course on Asian history with thematic relevance for World History. Topics vary according to instructor.

6530  Women in Asia (3)
   Meets with HIST 4530. Additional work is required of graduate students. A course examining the history of women, gender relations and ideas about gender in East, South and/or Southeast Asia. Geographic extent of coverage and time frame may vary according to instructor.

6590  Gender and Power in Latin America (3)
   This course explores gender, power, and the creation of identities in Latin America. Students will develop an understanding of the relevant historiography; the cultural context within which academic knowledge is produced regarding Latin America and gender studies; how to read primary sources utilizing the insights of feminist research; and, central issues in Latin American historical studies.

6750  U.S. Foreign Relations: Colonial Era to 1898 (3)
   Meets with HIST 4750. Explores the early history of the United States foreign relations, from the era of colonization to the Spanish-American War of 1898. Covers the rise of the United States as a world power, the impact of domestic developments on foreign relations, the significance of economic and financial developments, and evolving conceptions of sovereignty, nationality, and citizenship.

6765  The Vietnam War (3)
   Meets with HIST 4765. This course traces the history of the Vietnam War from its origins at the end of World War II to the reconciliation of Vietnam and the United States in the 1990s. Diplomatic and military developments will be examined in the context of the social, economic, and political history of North and South Vietnam and the United States, and the war will be viewed from the perspective of both sides.

6780  The Korean War (0)
   The Korean War course approaches the conflict from an international perspective. it considers Korea's position at the center of international rivalry in the early twentieth-century. As central, Korea is placed in the center of Asian wars that raged from the late 1940s into the 1970s. The course examines the conduct of the war as an international effort involving the multiple powers and the United Nations. Last, the course will end by looking at the impact of the war on Cold War and the arms race of the 1950s and 1960s.

6790  American Religions (3)
   Meets with HIST 4790. Surverys the major faiths found in the United States - Protestantism, Catholicism, Native American traditions, Judaism - and examines their relationship to American culture. Focuses on the period between 1870 and the present.

6820  Pacific Histories: Encounter, Colonialism, Transformation (3)
   Meets with HIST 4820. Examines the history and consequences of European and American colonialism in the Pacific region from the late 18th century to the present. Focuses on developments on the Pacific coasts of America, the Pacific Islands, Australia, and New Zealand. Topics include Polynesian/European discourses about the Pacific as the new "New World", missionaries and religious transformations, gender relations and the colonial process, cross-cultural trade, and European anthropology and Pacific peoples.

6830  Decolonization and Postcolonialism, 1945-Present (3)
   This course traces the process of withdrawal by Great Britain and France from their colonies in Asia and Africa, beginning in 1947. It discusses the heavy-industrialization and centralized education schemes which nationalist elites adopted in their countries after gaining independence. The course concludes with an analysis of postcolonialism, a form of criticism which blames colonialism for the economic and social difficulties encountered today in Asia an Africa.

6840  Global Environmental History (3)
   Environmental history lends itself nicely to considering comparative, transnational, and global themes. This course would take advantage of the rapidly accumulating literature from case studies around the world to explore nature's role in human affairs from pre-history to present.

6855  Environmental History of India (3)
   Meets with HIST 4855. This course examines India and South Asia's Environmental history from the ancient Harappan civilization (ca. 2500BC) to the present. The region's natural diversity spans from Himalayan snowcaps to tropical forests, from arid deserts to lush jungles. Intersecting this natural world, South Asia has been home to a wide variety of political bodies, from great indigenous empires (like that of the Maurayas, Guptas and Vijayanagar) to European colonial powers led by Portuguese, Dutch French and British forces.

6860  Environmental History of China (3)
   Meets with HIST 4860. Overview of the history of China's environment beginning with the philosophical foundations for thinking about nature and human interaction with the environment and then covering changes in the environment, shifting policies, and approaches to environmental problems from medieval times through the present.

6865  Gender, Race and Empire in Asia (3)
   Meets with HIST 4865. Examines how ideas about gender and race shaped and were shaped by colonialism and anti-colonial nationalism in Asia from the 18th through 20th centuries. It covers the Chinese Qing Empire, British India, Dutch Indonesia, the Japanese empire, and the U.S. colony of the Philippines.

6880  Special Studies in Latin American History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in Latin American history. Topics and requirements to be arranged with instructor.

6890  Special Studies in World History (3)
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6900  Special Studies in European History (3)
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6910  Special Studies in American History (1 to 10)
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6920  Special Studies in Middle Eastern History (3) Cross listed as MID E 6592.
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6930  Special Studies in Asian History (3)
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6940  Directed Reading (1 to 5) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6950  Special Studies in British History (3)
   Content varies depending on instructor.

6970  Thesis Research: M.A. (3 to 10) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6980  Faculty Consultation (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

7010  Oral History (3)

7020  Archival Principles and Methods (3)

7240  Comparative Gender History (3)
   Takes a comparative approach to the exploration of the history of women and gender. Provides students with a grounding in the particularities of women's experiences in a global context and a theoretical understanding of the diversity of conceptions of gender and the methodological approaches historians use to explore gender in different cultural contexts.

7500  Proseminar: U.S. History to 1877 (3)
   The first of a two-semester sequence offering a broad introduction to the graduate study of American history.

7510  Proseminar: U.S. History Since 1877 (3)
   The second half of a two-semester sequence offering a broad introduction to the graduate study of American history.

7600  Colloquium in American History (3)
   A graduate-level reading course in American History. Topic Varies.

7610  Colloquium in 19th Century U.S. History (3)
   A graduate-level reading course in 19th Century United States History.

7620  Colloquium in the History of the American West (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in the History of the American West.

7630  Colloquium in American Women's History (3)
   Women as historical subjects; gender as category of historical analysis. Develops skills in critical thinking and historical judgment; introduces students to professional networks, associations, and research tools. Social construction of gender in colonial New England, 19th-century "cult of domesticity,'' extent of 20th-century tranformation of Victorian womanhood, and complexities of class, race, and culture in writing women's history.

7640  Colloquium in Early America (3)
   A graduate readings course in the colonial and revolutionary periods of American history.

7650  Colloquium in American Social History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in American Social History.

7660  Graduate Colloquium in the History of U.S. Foreign Relations (3)
   Readings and discussions of both classic texts and new scholarship in the history of America in the World. Focus on the 20th century; paper to analyze a particular topic and its various interpretations.

7670  Colloquium in Environmental History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in Environmental History.

7680  Colloquium in American Religious History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in American Religious History.

7690  Colloquium on The United States in World History (3)
   This graduate-level readings course focuses on the connection between the United States experiences and the larger human communities and processes that have reshaped the globe over the past four hundred years.

7700  Colloquium in European History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in European History.

7720  Colloquium on Early Medieval Europe (3)
   The purpose of this course is to examine recent scholarship on themes which are currently central to studies in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (roughly 300-900). The class will meet every week to discuss common readings around a theme. The theme will include, but are not confined to ethnogenesis, urban studies, gender, power and violence, law, trade and economy, archaeology, eschatology and liturgy.

7740  Colloquium in Middle Eastern History (3) Cross listed as MID E 7574.
   Graduate readings and discussions of Middle Eastern research topics.

7750  Colloquium in Latin American History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in Latin American history. Offered on various topics.

7760  Colloquium in Asian History (3)
   A graduate-level readings course in Asian history. Offered on various topics.

7770  Colloquium: Themes in World History (3)
   This course is designed to enable students to explore in-depth key issues in World History. These may include the America 1450-2000 in which topics such as industrialization, disease, import-substitution, globalization, revolution and multinational corporations are examined across the western hemisphere from North to South America. Similarly, oceans and exchanges, migration and diaspora, or technology, transportation and global integration may be selected as the central theme.

7780  Historiography of the Middle East (3) Cross listed as MID E 7578.

7790  World History:Texts & Contexts (3)
   Historiographical survey of major episodes and themes in modern world history. The course serves as a foundation for graduate students interested in teaching at the pre-collegiate or collegiate level.

7800  Historical Methods (3)

7810  Seminar in Asian History (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Asian History.

7820  Seminar in Medieval History (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Medieval History.

7830  Seminar in Early Modern Europe: (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Early Modern Europe.

7840  Seminar in Modern Europe (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Modern Europe.

7850  Seminar in U.S. Colonial and Early National History (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in U.S. Colonial and Early National History.

7860  Seminar in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century America (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century America.

7870  Seminar in the American West (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in the American West.

7880  Seminar in Latin American History (3)
   A graduate-level research seminar in Latin American history. Offered on various topics.

7890  Seminar in the Middle East (3) Cross listed as MID E 7589.
   Graduate discussions and research paper on classical or modern topics.

7900  Seminar in Ancient History (3)
   This seminar is a variable content course concentrating on different problems and periods in Greek or Roman history.

7970  Thesis Research: Ph.D. (3 to 9) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

7980  Faculty Consultation (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

7990  Continuing Registration (0) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.


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