University of Utah
Art History
ARTH Course Descriptions
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University of Utah

General Catalog Fall 2009
Posted Mar 02, 2009

Disclaimer: The course information below is current as of Mar 02, 2009, is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute a legal contract between the University of Utah and any person or entity.

This Web document is updated twice a year, on or about the first day of registration for Fall and Spring semesters.


1010  Masterpieces of World Art (3) Fulfills Fine Arts Exploration.
   A basic introduction to major works of art and architecture from around the globe. Individual works are examined for their value in communicating ideas of different cultures throughout the history of civilization. Students study paintings, sculptures, ceramics, and other art forms by analyzing their artistic principles and meaning. Students also learn how works of art come to be considered masterpieces.

1020  Art Now: Themes in Contemporary Art (3) Fulfills Fine Arts Exploration.
   Art Now offers student an introduction to the theories, practices, and debates around contemporary American and global art, 1960 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on art of the last decade. The approach to the material will be thematic rather than strictly chronological; course lectures and discussions will explore key themes, like memory and loss, and significant strategies, like repetition and appropriation, by giving each an art-historical context and then moving on to examine specific examples of recent American as well as global art.

1030  Art in Utah: 160 years (3)
   This course is designed to examine Art in Utah, including: Utah Artists, Visiting Artists and Exploration Artists. From Thomas Moran to Max Ernst to Georgia O'Keeffe, visiting artists have come to Utah to record the grand and surreal images that comprise the unique geographic landscape. At the same time, Utah artists were establishing schools of Art; graduating from the physically challenging Pioneer Period to Second and Third Generation artists that were trained in New York and Europe. Today's Utah Artists have a national presence that will be examined. The course includes numerous trips to see, first hand, the Art in Utah.

2500  Introduction to the History or Art and Visual Culture (3) Fulfills Humanities Exploration.
   Introduces the history of art by investigating the ways in which art has developed and functioned within past and present world cultures. It also examines the changing methods of interpretation that are elicited from the study of the art of the past and used in the contemporary discipline of art history. Focuses on analyzing works of art, using both traditional and contemporary approaches and perspectives, for the purpose of understanding the relationship between artistic expression and cultural context.

3010  Arts of Southeast Asia I: "Ancient" and "Classical" (3)
   The course considers the ancient temple art and architecture (predominantly Buddhist and Hindu) of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam). We look broadly at the indigenous material cultures of Southeast Asia before launching into the symbolic and religious meanings embedded in monuments such as Borobudur, Angkor Wat, and That Luang. We question how and why these monuments came to dominate the 'canons' of Southeast Asian art when the indigenous people equally value textiles, jewelry, and basket weaving. Is this propensity to glorify the ancient pasts of Southeast Asia and their 'Golden Ages' a result of the colonial legacy? How do these monuments become the symbol of modern nationhood?

3015  Arts of Southeast Asia II: Modern and Contemporary (3)
   The course introduces students to modern and contemporary arts of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Burma [Myanmar], Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia) and diaspora(s). We begin with a look at the different schools of art established during the colonial era, before turning to the politics of modernity and considering both colonial and native perspectives. We then shift our attention to the contemporary arts of Southeast Asia in global perspective. Some of the issues that we engage with include: nationalism, exile and homeland, trauma, gender, sexuality, and the body. In relation to visual materials, we consider 'documentary' photography, painting, sculpture, video installation and performance arts.

3020  Arts of China (3)
   The course introduces the arts of China from the Neolithic period to the Qing Dynasty. We look at how the material remains such as bronzes, lacquers, and tomb sculpture shed light on the "Chinese" notion of the body, life after death, and immortality. Students are introduced to the different ethnic groups that came to rule China and subsequently, we question what constitutes "Chineseness" in Chinese art. Lastly, we see how the arts reflect and engage with religions and philosophies such as Daoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. One of the objectives of this course is to study how art objects de-center the so-called, "Middle Kingdom."

3030  Indian Art and Religions (3)
   The course introduces Indian art and visual culture from the 1st to 20th century. We look at the materials (paintings, sculpture, and architecture) in the context of religions (Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Islam), rituals, and indigenous notions of aesthetics. Students who are interested in religions and visual culture from a comparative perspective are encouraged to take this course but it is open to all who would like to gain insight into the power of sacred images.

3040  Body, Sex, and Gender in Indian Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 3040 or courses in Histories of Asia or Gender Studies.
   The course addresses the representation of the body, gender, and sexuality in Indian art and visual culture from the 1st century to the 20th century. The course begins with an overview of the visual depictions of gender and sexuality in religious and court contexts, in contemporary art and in films of India. It is followed by a close examination of discourses on Indian "erotic" arts produced by European and Indian writers from the colonial period. We then shift our lens and focus to scholarship on this topic from a postcolonial perspective. The last portion of the class is devoted to looking at photography, films, and contemporary art of South Asia, in particular, the arts created by queer South Asian (gay and lesbian) artists and queer artists of South Asian descent in the diasporas. One of the objectives of the course is to see how the visual arts in India challenge and subsequently produce an indigenous, hybrid, and erotic field of vision and visuality.

3050  Art and Films of Southeast Asia (3)
   The course introduces students to films that deal with Southeast Asia and its diaspora(s) (Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, and Burma [Myanmar]). We begin with a close viewing of the portrayal of Southeast Asia and Southeast Asians in Hollywood films. We then look at how French and British filmmakers chose to portray their former colonies in films such as " The Lover," "The Letter," and "L'Indochine." Subsequently, we consider how Southeast Asians living in the diaspora(s) have chosen to represent themselves. Issues to be addressed in the course include: race, colonialism, gender, sexuality, identity politics, memory and trauma.

3060  Buddhist Arts and Visual Culture of Asia (3)
   The course introduces Buddhist are and architecture of Asia from 566 CE to the 19th century. We begin with India, the birthplace of the historical Buddha and turn to China, Japan, and Korea. We take this opportunity to look both broadly and closely at how works of art and architecture reflect and engage with the doctrine and practice of different schools of Buddhism. The course begins with an inquiry into the initial motivation behind the making of "the Buddha image" and its subsequent replications. We then look at the visual-tellings of Buddhism in the narrative art of India and China. In addition, we also consider the relationship between patronage, styles, and the ritual use of arts in the Chan and Zen schools. Moreover, we explore the sacred space in the painted mandalas of Japan and in three-dimensional stone monuments of Southeast Asia.

3100  Antiquity: The Classical Ideal (3)
   Explores the art and architecture of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Students examine key historical moments to develop a critical framework for understanding the "classical ideal." Principles of archaeology open discussions on modern perceptions of Antiquity. Comparisons are made with revival movements.

3150  Medieval Art and Architecture (3)
   Presents the art and architecture of the East and West European Middle Ages from the Late Antique to the Late Gothic periods. Lectures, projects, and discussions collectively ground works of art in a cultural context. Students compare traditional and contemporary methodologies for interpreting diverse forms of art.

3170  East Mediterranean Cultures (3)
   Course content includes the art and architecture of Coptic, Byzantine, Islamic, and Crusader communities. The focus is on distinguishing art which developed within its own Eastern traditions from objects drawing on European influence.

3200  Renaissance Europe (3)
   Builds upon the concepts introduced in Art History 2500 and examines 15th- and 16th-century art in Europe. The goal is to understand what is meant by the cultural movement of the Renaissance and to explore its relationship to the works of the leading artists of Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany.

3250  Baroque Art in Europe (3)
   The 17th century was a time of dynamic political, social, and religious changes calling for a re-examination of tradition and the purposes of art. Many artists in Italy, Flanders, Holland, Spain, France, and England experimented with ways of involving the viewer in their art for persuasion and more engagement in the issues of the day. The course expands on the introduction in Art History 2500 with an exploration of ways that works of painting, sculpture and architecture serve a cultural purpose in the conception and propagation of ideas.

3310  Visual Arts of the Enlightenment, 1648-1793 (3)
   A study of transformations in the art and culture of Europe and America during the age of Enlightenment, viewed in relation to key scientific, social, and cultural developments. Students examine the role of visual experience in the rise of empiricism, the development of the public sphere, humanitarian reform, and the culture of sensibility.

3320  Arts of Revolution Era (3)
   The visual arts and material culture of Europe and America viewed in relation to social and political change from the time of the American and French Revolutions until the European Revolutions of 1848.

3330  Visual Arts of Modernity, 1848-1900 (3)
   An introduction to the major currents of art production and visual experience in second half of the nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the ways in which artistic experimentation challenged traditional social and political orders in concert with-and sometimes in contrast to-such phenomena as mass uprising, imperial conquest, civil war, industrial and technological development.

3400  20th Century Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   A survey of the work of major 20th-century European and American artists, the course aims to introduce students to the aesthetic theories, critical debates and social contexts that shape the diverse practices of art in the 20th century. Grading will be based on class participation, exams and written assignments.

3510  Modern Latin American Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This class will explore how modernity was absorbed and reflected in the visual arts of Latin America during the 19th and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. Within this genealogy we will address how art sustains real and imagined narratives of a Latin American identity with particular attention to class, gender, race and ethnic representations.

3550  Latin American Avant-Gardes (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   The course will focus on the growth of institutions such as the museum and the biennale in championing a Latin American avant-garde. The course will address both international influences as well as specific local conditions in circumscribing the category of the avant-garde art in Latin America.

3600  The History of Photography (3) Fulfills Fine Arts Exploration.
   Traces the different directions photography has taken since its inception, using the social and cultural environment as a context and focus on the ever-increasing use of photography by artists in the creative process from the first uses of the camera obscura to the present. The specific reasons that set the stage for the "invention" of photography and how photography changed the role of the artists of the 19th- and 20th-centuries will be discussed. The lectures will cover documentary photography and the rise of photography as a separate art form. The course will also discuss photography's characteristics as an art form and how it has changed our perceptions of the world. In the 20th-century, photographs have become a discreet language of signs, symbols, and metaphors with implied narratives.

3700  Study Abroad in Art History (1 to 6) Prerequisite: Intended for Art History Majors and Minors.

4000  Good Looking: Writing About Art & Visual Culture (3) Fulfills Upper Division Communication/Writing.
   The course introduces students to reading, looking, and writing about art and visual culture. In addition, it will introduce students to seminal theoretical texts that address the issues of visual perspectives on race, class, gender, the body, art and culture. The assigned texts raise relevant questions: What is an image? How does one acquire visual literacy? What is the relationship between word and image? How does one approach and write about images effectively? Where does meaning reside? How has the emergence of the Internet and the digital camera changed our notions of an image and its replications? The course is structured around different media and thematic issues. One of the goals of the course is to teach students to write about all facets of art and visual images; more importantly, students will walk away from this course with the knowledge of, and polished skills in, different writing styles (descriptive, analytical, theoretical, creative/poetic, and research).

4010  Topics in Southeast Asian Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 3010.

4015  Traditional Performance Arts of Southeast Asia (3)
   The course introduces traditional theater and dance of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Burma, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos). We will look at the history and practice of shadow plays in Bali and Java, court and folk dances of Cambodia and Thailand and water puppets of Vietnam. Issues to be discussed include ritual, the body, narrative, and memory. In addition, we will also address what is lost and what is gained when traditional theaters and dances are packaged as tourist attractions. This course is open to anyone who is interested in the dramatic arts but students with a background in design, theater, dance, Asian Studies, film, history, anthropology, and culture studies are highly encouraged to take it.

4020  Chinese Painting (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   The course introduces students to Chinese paintings from the painted pottery of the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We will take this opportunity to look both broadly and closely at how the medium of painting became such a powerful visual expression in Chinese culture. We will read treatises (in translation) on paintings that discuss the laws and principles and in effect, inform us how painting are evaluated in Chinese culture. Students are introduced to the different formats of painting and how these different formats dictate our viewing perspectives and experience of narrative (i.e, story telling), figurative, and landscape paintings. In addition, issues such as portraiture, ethnicity and self representation as well as the social status of artists and their lives will also be taken into consideration.

4030  Topics in Indian Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 3030 or courses in history of Asia or Gender Studies.

4060  The Sex of Things: Material Cultures of Asia (3)
   The course introduces students to the theory and practice of material cultures in Asia. We will begin by reading seminal texts on theory of material cultures. Subsequently, students will spend time looking closely at objects on display at a museum and how they are kept in a museum's storage and consider their social, economic, and political implications. How do we approach objects such as teapots, textiles, and shoes differently from traditional media such as painting and sculpture? How do we go about learning how to write effectively about objects? The geographical are of Asia will alternate between East Asia and South and Southeast Asia respectively, according to the semester the course is offered. In East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) we will look at Buddhism and material cultures, especially the rise of Zen Buddhism and tea ceremony in Japan as well as the import and exports of ceramics and other goods between China, Holland, America and Portugal. In South and Southeast Asia, we will examine bronze drums, textiles, and jewelry as symbolic exchanges between genders and more. Students who are interested in a career in museum and the art market are encouraged to take this course but it is open to anyone who loves (and lusts) after objects. Students will write a series of short papers based on their objects of desire.

4090  Seminar in Southeast Asian Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   The seminar provides students with an opportunity to look at visual treatments of special themes and topics in Southeast Asian art and visual culture.

4095  Seminar in Chinese Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

4096  Seminar in Indian Art (3)
   The seminar provides students with an opportunity to look at visual treatments of special themes and topics in Indian art and visual culture.

4110  Greek Art and Architecture (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 3100.
   Artistic achievement of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Alexandrine Empire is examined in lecture and discussion. The course includes aspects of Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations before turning to developments at Early Greek, Classical, and Hellenistic sites. Students are acquainted with principles of archaeology.

4120  Roman Art and Architecture (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 3100.
   The art and architecture of Rome and her dominions constitute a foundation for understanding the history of the Roman Republic and Empire. Course content ranges in date from the Etruscan period to the Late Antique. Students are acquainted with principles of archaeology.

4150  Early Medieval Themes (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 3150.
   Explores the early history of Christian art and architecture and the development of representational systems of spiritual subjects. Objects are highlighted against a cultural context undergoing profound change.

4160  Topics in Medieval Art (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 3150.
   Students examine artistic developments which accompany periods of medieval growth and prosperity. Versatile urban achievements will be placed in a broader historical context. Reassessing the terms Romanesque and Gothic is central to the content in light of contemporaneous political, social, economic and religious changes.

4190  Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   The advanced study of ancient and medieval art through historical/contextual methods, addressed through lecture, discussion, and student project.

4195  Seminar in Medieval Books and Production Practices (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Assesses structure and decoration in the manufacture parchment manuscripts to the appearance of incunabula and printed codices. Directed student projects guide course content.

4210  Italian Renaissance Art: Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Emphasizes an understanding of the nature of artistic acheivements just before and during the Early Renaissance in Central and Northern Italy. Major attention is given to the circumstances of art production and patronage that supported the development of a new naturalism of representation.

4220  Italian Renaissance Art: Sixteenth Century (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Florence, Rome, and Venice were the centers for High Renaissance art in the early16th-century, and by the 1540s many artists experimented with an idealism in art that was directly derived from the works of the High Renaissance masters Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo Buonarroti, and Titian. The course examines the achievements of the High Renaissance masters in their context and considers how their art prepared the way for the later diversity of developments.

4230  Northern Renaissance Art: Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Examines the art of France, the Netherlands, and Germany and considers how social, religious, and political factors contributed to the development of a Northern tradition of realism.

4250  Southern Baroque Art and Architecture (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Course focuses on understanding the artistic productivity that was seen in Italy, Spain, and France in the 17th century. The emphasis is on exploring several basic historical problems raised by the art: What notions were current about the nature of art and its functions? What subjects were acceptable and what was the character of artistic imagery? Who were the patrons and what was the relationship between art and society?

4260  Topics in Northern Baroque Art (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Explores different topics and examines the most recent developments in the study of the art of the Netherlands.

4290  Seminar in Renaissance and Baroque Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   A capstone seminar for Art History majors. The course is organized around selected readings and group discussions of the historiography and methods used in the study of Renaissance and Baroque art.

4295  Seminar in History of Prints (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Printed pictures using the techniques of woodcut, engraving, etching, and lithography were the most popular forms of visual art and communication before the invention of photography. The course, centered on the Utah Museum of Fine Arts' collection of prints, is a study of the history and methods of printmaking from the 15th century to the present. Students carry out independent research projects with the primary objective of developing the necessary skills to increase knowledge and enjoyment of prints.

4310  Art and the Public Sphere (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   An examination of fine art and popular culture in relation to concepts of "the public" from the 18th century to present. Topics may include such areas as the history of exhibition and display, institutional practice and pedagogy, communications and new media, and the politics of collectivity and selfhood.

4320  American Encounters (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   A study of American art with a focus on historical encounters among diverse cultures, structural transformations such as the rise of the middle classes and the emergence of consumer and mass culture, and aesthetic exchanges between "high" art and vernacular expression.

4330  Art and Technologies of Vision (3) Recommended Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This course addresses ways in which art and visual experience have been shaped through technologies of vision such as the art of spectacle, methods of scientific imaging and investigation, and innovation in the representation of time, space and movement. Emphasis is on the cultural social and aesthetic meanings of technological development and change.

4390  Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 3250.
   Topics in the art and culture of 18th-century Europe and/or America under the social, cultural and political conditions of Enlightenment and Revolution.

4395  Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 3320 and 4320.
   Topics in European and/or American art and culture under the social, cultural and political conditions of Modernity.

4410  Modern Art: 1900-1945 (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   An exploration of the visual arts from 1900 to World War II. The course covers major artists and movements of the early 20th century, as well as critical debates over modernism, avant-garde, mass culture, art and politics, gender and sexuality and the nature of artistic production. Grading is based on classroom participation, exams, and written assignments.

4420  Modern Art and After: 1945-1975 (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   The class examines a range of American and European art from the 1940s to the 1980s. Lectures and readings cover the periods major movements - including Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Process and Performance Art - as well as the critical debates over modernism, mass culture, gender and sexuality, and the nature of artistic production.

4430  Art Since 1970 (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This course explores the issues and history of global contemporary art from 1970 to the present. We will discuss the major artistic movements, aesthetic theories and critical debates of art in the late 20th and early 21st centuries to gain a better understanding of the diversity of contemporary visual practices in a globalized art world.

4440  Topics in Modern Sculpture: Body, Object, Image (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   The course explores the history of sculpture from the 1880s to the present day, a period when sculpture breaks free from its traditional materials and techniques and preoccupation with human figure. We look at a wide range of approaches and types of objects including figurative statuary, monuments, found objects and assemblages, site-specific installations, land art and total environments. Among the questions asked are: What is the role of sculpture in major artistic movements of the 20th century? To what extent have the aesthetic strategies of scuplture differed from those of other media such as painting and architecture? How have artists at different moments sought to either emphasize the material status of sculpture as an object or make sculpture conform to the visual models of modernism. How have sculptors responded to the material and technology of modern industry, the emerging practices of photography and film and the processes of mass production and consumption?

4490  Seminar in Contemporary Art Theory and Criticism (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   The seminar addresses a range of contemporary writing on the visual arts. In addition to recent essays and reviews, assignments include key theoretical texts that underpin contemporary art writing. Students are responsible for weekly reports on assigned reading and a final research paper or project.

4495  Seminar in Modern Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   This seminar offers students the opportunity for in depth study of special themes and topics in modernist art and visual culture.

4500  Special Topics in Art History (3) Prerequisite: Declared major or minor in Art History.
   The lecture course provides for the study of the art and architecture of a culture that is not part of the regular art history curriculum. Offered occasionally.

4510  Special Topics in Latin American Art and Visual Culture (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   Meets with ARTH 6510. Special Topics in Latin American art and visual culture.

4520  Topics in Brazilian Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This class will investigate Brazilian artistic production from the 1600s to the present. The course is oriented around the role of different institutions such as the church, slavery, the art academy, the state, and museums/galleries in the construction of a national identity within Brazilian Art.

4530  Chicano Art (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This course will explore the Chicano/a visual culture and its relationship to the Chicano political movement during the 1960s. Through an investigation of various media such as murals, lithographs, posters and performance are, the course will explore questions related to identity politics, feminism, collaboration, exhibition practices and the politics of aesthetics.

4540  Border Visual Culture (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500.
   This class will investigate different manifestations of the U.S./Mexican border in the visual arts. Examining different perspectives through a variety of media, this class will complicate and expand the more one-dimensional treatment of the border in mass media as a linear and fixed entity. Throughout the class we will explore how representations of the border correspond to shifting social, political and economic circumstances as well as discourses surrounding multiculturalism and globalization.

4590  Seminar: Latin American Art (3) Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.
   Meets with ARTH 6880. Senior seminar in Latin American art and visual culture.

4600  Museum Practices (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 2500 and 12 semester credit hours of upper-division Art History courses.
   Students gain a basic knowledge of museum and museology through lecture, readings, and discussion. The course treats modern museum practices and provides hands-on experiences as an introduction to the profession.

4750  Directed Study in Art History (3) Prerequisite: Senior Standing.
   Independent study option for art history students.

4850  Internship in Art History (3) Prerequisite: Advanced standing in major.
   Practicum on- or off-campus with a pre-approved agency.

4910  Honors Art History I (3)
   Restricted to art history majors in the departmental Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

4920  Honors in Art History II (3)
   Restricted to art history majors in the departmental Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

4985  Honors Seminar in Art History (3)
   Restricted to art history majors in the departmental Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

4999  Honors Thesis/Project (3)
   Restricted to students in the Honors Program working on their Honors degree.

6000  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.
   Designed for students accepted in the M.F.A. Program, Department of Art and Art History.

6001  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.

6002  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.

6003  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.

6004  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.

6005  MFA Graduate Project in Art History (3) Prerequisite: MFA student in the Department of Art and Art History.

6010  Advanced Southeast Asian Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6020  Advanced Chinese Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6030  Advanced Indian Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6100  Advanced Ancient Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6150  Advanced Medieval Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6200  Advanced Renaissance Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6250  Advanced Baroque Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6310  Advanced Eighteenth-Century Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6320  Advanced Nineteenth-Century Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6400  Advanced 20th c. Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6410  Advanced Contemporary Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6500  Special Topics in Art History (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   The seminar provides for the study of the art and architecture of a culture that is not part of the regular art history curriculum. Offered occasionally.

6510  Advanced Latin American Art and Visual Culture (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   Meets with ARTH 4510. Advanced Latin American art and visual culture.

6800  Critical Theory and Methodology of Art History (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   Exploration of the history and methods of the art history discipline through reading and discussion. Students write individual papers in several states and drafts for evaluation by the group in terms of the application of method and critical response to current issues.

6810  Visual Intersections: Critical Approaches to Art and Visual Culture (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   An interdisciplinary seminar in visual culture open to graduate students across the university that will introduce and explore some of the diverse scholarly approaches to the production, use, interpretation and experience of images and visual representations. Through key theoretical texts and a series of historical and contemporary case studies, the course addresses a broad range of visual representations including different media and genre of the fine arts, performance, advertising and design, film, television, video and digital media. From this diverse material of visual culture, we ask a series of interrelated questions. What is visual culture? What are the politics and poetics of vision and visuality. What is the relationship of our daily experience of visuality to the academic study of images? How does the materiality of specific visual practices affect representation and visual experience? How do different media and technologies of representation affect discourses on race, class, gender, the body, art and culture?

6830  Seminar: Asian Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6840  Seminar: Ancient and Medieval Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6850  Seminar: Renaissance and Baroque Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6860  Seminar: Eighteenth-Nineteenth c. Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6870  Seminar: Art of the Twentieth Century (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6880  Seminar: Latin American Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   Meets with ARTH 4590. Seminar in Latin American art and visual culture.

6910  Directed Studies in Asian Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6920  Directed Studies in Ancient and Medieval Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6930  Directed Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6940  Directed Studies in Eighteenth-Nineteenth c. Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6950  Directed Studies in 20th c. Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6955  Directed Studies in Contemporary Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.

6960  Directed Study in Latin American Art (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing required.
   Directed studies in Latin American art and visual culture.

6970  Thesis Research: MA (3 to 9) Prerequisite: Students in MA Program in ARTH.
   For graduate students conducting research leading to completion of Master's Thesis in Art History.

6980  Faculty Consultation: M.A. (3) Prerequisite: Students in MA Program in ARTH.


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